Longevity of SSF4


#1

I’m trying to decide whether or not to go out and get a 360, stick, and ssfiv to one day be a veteran, or will capcom decide they’re going to make SF5 and then SSF5

so tell me, how long do you think SSFIV will stay cool?


#2

Cool factor went out the door a looong time ago.


#3

Ono said that SFV will coming sooner. I think he really meant that it wouldn’t take 10 years for SFV to be released. You got time.


#4

9-10 years past before Street Fighter 4 came out after 3…
Forget about SF5.


#5

I want to be the very best guys, like no one ever was (not even daigo)


#6

Until 3SO comes out


#7

SFIV really brought back a lot of attention to the franchise, but I think that attention will be short lived. Most people I know bought the game for the nostalgia, I mean everyone who’s 20+ years old remembers SF2. The problem with SF4 that I see is it’s a pretty frustrating game. Little attention was put on actual gameplay mechanics, meaning WAAAY too much time is spent on glitter, flashy screens/menus which might seem cool at first but get boring and distracting really fast. On top of that, the game is just frustrating. It’s not uncommon for people to play, either with friends or online and just get angry playing it.

A good game with replay value is one where when you lose, or when you get mad, you get mad at yourself. That kind of anger is actually fun, it’s what makes something challenging. Often when you lose or get mad playing SFIV, you get mad at the game, you feel cheated. Obviously high level players don’t feel this way and this post doesn’t apply to the 1% of people who actually know every little detail of the game. But for the ordinary person who wants to play at some reasonable skill level, when they lose they don’t think “Ah man, my opponent really outsmarted me there.” You usually think “WTF, that’s the 10th time he did that, and he can just get away with repeating that move over and over!!” This is typically because some game mechanic/gimmick kicked in and instead of relying on intuition or experience to defend against a very predictable/repeatable attack, you had to have memorized something obscure, like a frame rate or a hit box.

So call me skeptical, but I think if SF wants to capitalize on this new surge in attention with a wider range of audience, they should put less emphasis on ADHD gimmicks and flashiness, and instead make the game more intuitive. Have a bunch of ordinary players try the game and count the number of “WTFs” are muttered over a period of an hour.


#8

Is this a troll post?

You’re going to need a 360 and stick to play SF5 regardless, so you may as well get them now and enjoy them. And playing SSF4 will help you prepare for SF5 at the very least by teaching you how to apply fundamentals to your game, and the adaption to SF5 will take much less time than flat out learning everything from scratch. That’s why the pros from the early 2000s are still top players if not the best players around now, because they’ve been with the franchise for so long and were able to quickly transfer their skills to SSF4.


#9

SC2 is here.


#10

>implying that the only reason people lose in SSF4 is because moves are GDLK and let your opponent continuously repeat them ad infidium. Also when I get mad, I get mad at myself all the time, I don’t blame random shit that I couldn’t beat, because nothing in this game is unbeatable. Also implying that only 1% of all SSF4 players are high level. How about put some time into it and then you don’t get beat as much. You think that people were happy about 3S when it first came out, fuck no. New players got demolished in that game. The whole idea of “everything you do is punishable with the correct timing/parry skills” probably fucked up a lot of players, but nonetheless we overcame, and got better, same shit with Super.


#11

What?? SFV only for xbox360?? no cross platform?


#12

I didn’t imply anything, my post was written in an explicit and deliberate fashion. Any implication is simply you reading more into the post than what is stated.

First, about 3 million copies of the game have sold, that means 1% of players constitutes 30,000 people. I’d say there are fewer than 30,000 people in the world who are top level players at Street Fighter. Yeah yeah I know Player Points mean nothing, but considering I’m not even a high level player and I’m ranked in the top 3000 with only 3400 PPs, I’d definitely argue that fewer than 1% of those who own a copy of SSF4 are high level players.

I also never said that nothing in the game is unbeatable. I explicitly stated that the way to beat a move is not based on intuition, nor is it based on practice, but instead based on memorization. Specifically you need to memorize frame rate data, hit boxes, priorities and other things which are not clearly laid out from the game itself. This isn’t something ordinary or casual players care to do and it isn’t the hallmark of a game that is open and accessible to a wide audience. If it was based on intuition, then it would be clear that when the model representing your character touches the model representing your opponent, an attack can take place. However, seeing that this game is based not on character models which are observable to the player, but instead on invisible hit boxes, it is very common to get hit despite your model being nowhere close to your opponent, and unless you know what a hit box is, you won’t know why. The opposite is also true whereby you clearly see that you hit your opponent, but because the invisible hit boxes didn’t touch, no damage is done.

3S is one of the least popular games in the SF franchise. Using it as an example of longevity or popularity does not bode well for your argument.


#13

The trolls are out in full affect tonight! SSFIV will last for along time… Well at least until SFV! Scheduled to be released sometime in 2020!


#14

Umm yeah… the frame data/hitbox are a part of every street fighter games. Every move in every game runs on frames and uses hitboxes. Noone asking you to do either.

Who gives a shit if 3s was popular or not. Popularity=/= good game


#15

I think this is naive. Popularity is vital for the continued success of a game. Popularity allows more people to be involved in the game, makes for better competition and more points of view.

Capcom would be committing suicide if they designed their games to appeal to a small minority rather than designing a game that can be enjoyed by anyone. Luckily, Capcom doesn’t do this, and hopefully their future games will reduce the ‘frustration’ factor.


#16

Speaking of hitboxes, I love it when moves have hitboxes that don’t fully extend =/ … One of Ibuki’s command kicks has a hitbox that ends at about her ankle >.>

Of course… Popularity and quality definitely aren’t necessarily linked… especially when a lot of the nuances of what makes a game good or bad is subjective… but there is a point to be had here, in that popularity spurs growth, which is usually a good thing… and that Capcom is first and foremost a corporation who’s primary goal is getting as rich as possible.


#17

Popularity=easier gameplay=less competition.

Designing a game for everybody is dumb. You don’t have to play Street Fighter. Play an easy game that can be fun for everyone and keep Street Fighter from being scrub friendly. The frustration factor is peoples own incompetence.

Funky wtf moments have been in every Fighting game I have ever played.

What does that have anything to do with anything? This isn’t Economics. wtf do I care how Capcom is trying to make money.


#18

Easier gameplay doesn’t always mean lower skill ceiling. It could mean just a smaller learning curve and easier to get into.


#19

Easier startup doesn’t necessarily mean easier gameplay by design. Games without wicked basic executional requirements can still be quite fun, popular, and deep… since you can make up for easy basic execution with harder execution on harder things and more emphasis on mental aspects of the game.

Yeah I know. Some of them still annoy me. Lost a match today with her because the move was beaten clean by another attack because Ibuki’s hitbox/leg sticks out farther than the active hitbox of the attack.

Capcom will make money by trying to make products that sell well, i.e. are popular.


#20

I think the Malstrom gamers are out for a stroll tonight.

The question is: How do you do decrease the learning curve, but keeping everything else intact?

EDIT: I just realized I asked someone this earlier.