Looking into building a stick


#1

Well this is my first post so please be gentle, I tried the search but didn’t turn up anything that was much help. So if I missed a thread sorry.

I want to make an xbox 360 wired stick. I know the basics of everything I need and what needs to be done but I was wondering if there were any tutorials you guys recommend. I plan on using a Sanwa stick and Seimitsu buttons and I know where to buy them. What I’m really looking for is a list of raw materials that I will need like extra wires and the materials to make the actual box. A soldering tutorial probably wouldn’t hurt either.

I know I have the ability to assemble the stick, just not the know-how. Any suggestions?


#2

http://www.slagcoin.com/joystick.html

gl


#3

Thanks man! Have you ever built a stick?


#4

I’ve done heavy mods before but never built my own stick, which is why I’ll be needing Slagcoin’s website for advice too. I have a wired 360 pcb and my dad built me an arcade stick shell. I pretty much have everything and am waiting on a fanta stick and my parts from lizard lick.


#5

If your decent with wood working and have the right tools it’s not too difficult…

If you want it to look nice though be prepaired to make more than one, the first always looks like shit but then the second is gold.


#6

check the stickies


#7

Thanks guys.


#8

if you not sure of the layout you want, maybe make a prototype out of a shoe box or a lunch box or something first

then once you know what button layout, spacing, etc… then you can make one out of wood

-joe


#9

You should get your parts from Lizard Lick. They’ve got a bit of a delay right now with the SFIV rush, but you won’t find a better company to deal with, nor another good small-scale US distributor of Sanwa/Seimitsu parts.

Also, there’s a thread on what woods to use around here somewhere…
http://forums.shoryuken.com/showthread.php?t=144513 -Timoe’s wood guide.

I can tell you that Red oak is very nice to work with, but because it is very porus, filling in the grain can be frustrating. I used 2 applications of wood filler and several coats of primer, and I can still see the ghost of the grain -.-’’ A lot of builders are using maple or poplar, which is what I’m switching over to. I would stick with the woods that you can get from your local hardware store for now, and if you’re painting them you shouldn’t need to go more exotic. But, for the love of all things christmasy, don’t use pine!


#10

how is poplar compare to maple? which is easier to work with?

-joe


#11

I know what layout I want and I found a template of it already, but that’s not a bad idea. Any idea what I should cover the artwork with? I’ve seen that Byrdo uses lexan. Seems like a pretty good idea to just use that.


#12

Poplar is fairly soft for a hardwood. It’s also fairly unattractive as a finish wood but it’s got an even grain and it cuts nicely.

Maple is also a fine wood (I just built a stick out of maple, myself), but it’s likely to be a fair bit more expensive than poplar. It’s nice and hard with a fairly close grain. The hardness may make it more difficult to work than poplar, though.

Really, it comes down to how you plan to finish it. If you’re just going to paint it, go ahead and use poplar. It’s not worth the expense for a “nicer” hardwood.

If you’re looking for a more natural finish, maple will likely provide a nicer product. You can stain poplar to look decent if you get a piece without too much shading, but it’s not going to be quite as nice as a good figured piece of maple or even an oiled mahogany or oak.


#13

Thanks for the info… I was leading towards maple with clear coat

-joe