Math Gurus, a question: <1?


#1

Recently saw this on a product: <1

What does this mean? Greater than one, or less than one?

Since the open end of an equality sign usually means “greater”, it seems to suggest that means greater than 1. However a friend of mine who is better at math assures me that this means it is LESS than one.

I dunno… any suggestions?


#2

Less than one. <1 is less than or equal to one.

Although the simplicity of it is making me wonder if I’m wrong…


#3

The number 1 is right next to the part of the equality that means more or “Greater than”. So that would mean its greater than 1 right?

Also lets assume the way it is in some math problems that a number not being there, does not nescessaily mean there is no number. Like the way a lone X variable in algebra, with nothing else there, usally is assumed to be one.

So lets assume on the other (blank)side of that equality is a Zero.

Then 0<1= 1 is greater than.

Right? :confused:


#4

it means 0 is less than 1.

Pac Man eats the bigger number


#5

So if i see <1 on a product that means LESS THAN one?

If its less than 1, why wouldn’t it be 1< instead??


#6

damn is this thread for real? or just troll attempt?

whatever though, <1 = less than one, smaller than one, not greater than one, one is greater than etc

usually when <number(s) written on a product, it usually means “less than” e.g. <10 calories


#7

because that means 1 is less than ___

it’s just like english dude


#8

Okay, the < and > signs are very simple. Whatever is on the open side is the GREATER number.

So for instance:

0<1 means 0 is LESS THAN 1, you could say that 1 is GREATER THAN 0 with that as well, but generally since you read left to right you’d start with the 0. 1 > 0 would be the proper way to write 1 is GREATER THAN 0.

So if it says <1 on a product, it means whatever the <1 is referring to in quantity or what have you is LESS THAN one.


#9

dude what grade are you in? … seriously


#10

Less than one.

x<1.


#11

a<b = a is less than b
a>b = a is greater than b

the open end of < or > represents the greater quantity, the closed end represents the lesser quantity
1< = one is less than…


#12

Well excuseeeee me princess, for not being Mr. Perfect know-it-all lol.

Now i’ve definitely taken more than my share of math & algebra classes and passed them all. Sometimes i guess its just the simple things, or what should appear simple, that looks confusing.

What confuses me is the open end= Greater than, while the closed end= less than.

So if the 1 is right in front of the open end, that would mean the 1 is greater than.So it looked to me like <1 meant it is MORE/GREATER than one.

~TG, or something :confused:


#13

No, you read it the way its written, from left to right, not according to the quantities.

POP QUIZ :party:

In words, write the inequality…

  1. 1<3
  2. 69>7
  3. 1>0
  4. x< x+1
  5. a+b> a+b-1

#14

damn you must be some crazy ass ghetto motherfucker not even been to grade school.


#15

have you ever been tested for dyslexia?


#16

This thread is less “math guru” than it is “functioning middle school graduate”.


#17

Is .9 repeating less than 1? I searched the internet and couldn’t find any discussion about that topic.


#18

Listen to REALPLAYER. You read it like a sentence, LEFT TO RIGHT. Doing otherwise will only confuse you.

< is less than.
> is greater than.

1 < X
One is less than X.

3 > X
Three is greater than X.

1 < X < 3
One is less than X, and X is less than 3.


#19

.999 = 1 (assuming it is repeating of course). Simple proof:
1/3 = 0.333 repeating.
1/3 * 3 = 1
0.333 * 3 = 0.999

but since 1/3 = 0.333 then 0.333 * 3 = 1 therefore 0.999 = 1.


#20

If this thread was posted one week later I would have voted it for troll thread of the year, and it would have been in January.

Lol at "Now i’ve definitely taken more than my share of math & algebra classes and passed them all. Sometimes i guess its just the simple things, or what should appear simple, that looks confusing. "

This is 9th grade shit how you passed if you don’t know this?

Answer? He must be trolling.