Mindset that leads to a loss


#1

Hey long time lurker but thought it was time to contribute a few random thoughts to maybe help out some fellow noobs.

I love playing street fighter (in particular SSFIV) and I think I put in enough time with it to be better (Have a higher win ratio and maybe not come dead last at my local tournaments) at the game than I actually am right now.

However a funny realisation I have come to recently is that the effort it takes to win a tough match almost makes me not enjoy the game as much. For example, I will win a difficult (for me) game against a skilled player that took a lot of concentration on my part but not feel as satisfied had I have just crushed some scrub with my flowchart Juri.

I think maybe usually only playing before I go to bed and being tired contributes to this.

So whats the point in this post you ask? Well i’m not too sure either but basically wanted to share my experience in the amount of concentration and effort it takes to win a game against an advanced player and every move needs to be well considered to win. You can’t even for a second rely on any ‘tried and true’ methods which tends to be my natural play style and hence my large loss to win ratio.

How do you guys get the focus for winning and what is your mindset like when you play best?


#2

Yeah I don’t like taking hard classes either, its much more fulfilling to take underwater basket weaving.


#3

sounds like you should stick to halo.


#4

Do you think football players don’t have to work hard for each play?

That’s the game dude, you have to give it 100% every round. If that isn’t fun to you then just play casually for fun. There is nothing wrong with that.


#5

i get the focux for winning by selecting my team. my mindset when i play the best is no different than when i play the worst, it’s just im up against a different opponent.

TEAM BRUSHW0RK


#6

I just think that I am better than scrubs like u and i win faggit


#7

HAHA, wow! so much hate. I thought it might be fun to get a conversation going in the NEWBIE dojo designed for NEWBIES like myself.

Ah well guess I learnt my lesson.

For the moderators, I know you are keen to make SRK a friendlier place to come but the nerdrage is going to be a tough thing to weed out. Good luck!


#8

HAHA, wow! so much hate. I thought it might be fun to get a conversation going in the NEWBIE dojo designed for NEWBIES like myself.

Ah well guess I learnt my lesson.

For the moderators, I know you are keen to make SRK a friendlier place to come but the nerdrage is going to be a tough thing to weed out. Good luck!


#9

Well IMO some characters have a much easier time to win that others. If I understand you right it sounds like you dont like to work hard for wins and prefer just to mash/flowchart out wins. This will only get you so far and the game will quickly become boring if you keep on flowcharting. You will never improve and the competition will outdate you. It is a far more satisfying game if you work hard for the wins. It’s far more satisfying when I win with Fei Long or Cammy than when I win with Blanka, Guile or Ryu for example because you have to think about every move you do.

Try and learn a bit more about the game mechanics and delve a bit deeper into the game and you will reap the rewards. Juri is not a noob friendly character. I would suggest picking up Ryu to learn the basic game mechanics then move on from there.


#10

feels bad to have lost 3 times in a streak with my juri to a seth, those combos were so rad…


#11

You’ve got it all wrong man…
You really don’t need to think that hard to win. If you go into a game fully understanding your character and the matchup, then you should generally know what works and what doesn’t. Do what works, and when your opponent decides that he needs to make risky decisions to win the match, then you should have that match in the bag.
If you don’t understand your character’s matchups, though…thats when it gets frustrating. It all comes with experience and research if you’re willing to read up.


#12

Eh. I hate easy wins. But I also hate grinding out matches against online warriors that use lag to their advantage, there are challenging matches that are enjoyable and there are those that are fucking annoying. If either player sticks to a set pattern, regardless of who wins, it is pretty lame. I prefer FEEDBACK, one player adapting to the other, repeatedly, until the match ends.

As for mindsets that lead to a loss, for me it is usually trying to land something, such as a FA or a frame trap, when it just isn’t working out.


#13

Alright.


#14

even though SFIV is a very stale and formulaic game. You can’t just win matches through “tried and true” methods. That’s completely asinine to think you can win against another human being following a basic step by step strategy.


#15

don’t mug yourself


#16

You simply enjoy steamrolling over inexperienced people and having that feeling of superiority. That’s all there is to it, and that’s what the game is to you. It also sounds like you’re referring to “flowchart” play. Your “tried and true” methods are worth nothing if they make you predictable. You can’t always do the best move, because everything has an answer (if the game is designed well). When someone knows exactly what you’re going to do, they will respond with what best answers that, even if doing so is otherwise pathetisad. Once you start doing suboptimal things sometimes, you lose predictability and your standard tactics are more likely to work.

Here’s what I can suggest to really get you going.

  1. Have a general game plan, but don’t get sucked into playing like a flowchart. You’re not much better than the AI in that case. Be ready to react properly to whatever comes and present threats that make the opponent think as to how he should react. Play off the execution factor if you need to (for example, someone with a quick dash isn’t necessarily afraid of command grabs, since they can just dash in and do what they need to usually before the opponent can see it, identify the threat, and perform the action).
  2. Identify the various levels of the game. Just as Chess has an opening, midgame, and endgame, so do fighters generally have situational games. Every character has advantages in certain situations, usually range. Zangief’s far game is all about how to get himself in (unless he can comfortably turtle with a life lead), Dhalsim’s close game is about how to get himself out of trouble, El Fuerte’s knockdown game is as close to rock/paper/scissors as you’ll ever find, etc.
  3. Just read David Sirlin’s Playing to Win book: Game Design, Psychology, Flow, and Mastery - Playing to Win Index Seriously, the whole thing is about the mentality of gaming with the goal of winning. It changed my life.

#17

Ban this stupid double poster shitting up this forum


#18

Wow, there is a lot of hate. In regards to the original poster, I play every single match looking for that one player or match which is going to really challenge me and make me think. I play for that rush where I know every single button I press or don’t press could determine the match. No openings should be unpunished, bad spacing should be capitalized on. Those same matches you hate are the only reason I play this game. Easy wins are easy and boring. Block and punish stupidity is seriously boring and not fun.

If you want to take this game beyond the lowest levels, you’ll have to find a way to enjoy the high level game. If you can’t enjoy the high level game, stop playing or just play casually.


#19

i see


#20

Hey, thanks for the helpful responses guys, I definitely wasn’t saying that I thought my laziness was a good thing just being able to recognise it and wanting to change it is my goal. I’ve just started to notice how lazy I can be in my head when I play and along with a lot of things this aspect of my game needs to improve.