Never used Stick, should I go big on first one?


#1

So I’ve never used an arcade stick before on a console, I’ve been using fightpads since their introduction. Now I’ve found myself wanting to make the switch to arcade stick. Now the question is, do I buy one of the cheap ones on ebay for $60? Or do I go buy a madcatz one for $160, but if im dropping that kind of coin, is the quality good enough, when I can drop another hundred or so and get a custom stick?


#2

try to find a wwe stick.


#3

I’ve been thinking about, they are cheap, but jesus are they hideous. Do you think if I buy that it will just leave me wanting to buy a new one though?


#4

You can get a really good used stick from someone on this site for around 100. Much better than buying a 60 dollar POS. If you really want to spend a lot of money, I’d recommend a qanba stick, as their 150 dollar sticks come dual modded and the components are the same as the TE sticks.


#5

go big.
then you won’t be tempted to give up on a $150 object.


#6

Quality on TE is really good. They also have almost no pricedrop from new-used, so if you end up not liking it, you can always just sell it again.
You can also get one of the other stock sticks with Sanwa/Seimitsu parts. Eg spanish amazon offers new HRAP VX-SA for barely >100 €.


#7

Go big.

I’d be looking at the (MadCatz) FightStick PRO, SoulCalibur TE, FightStick V.S., (Hori) VX-SA, V3-SA, SoulCalibur V arcade stick.


#8

I didn’t go big on my first stick and I regret it. I got a SFIV SE stick back when they were still pretty hard to find. I upgraded everything to Sanwa and it was a decent stick, but I didn’t like the shape of the box or the weight, so I eventually picked up a TE. Had I just waited, I wouldn’t have been out the SE price ($80 I think) plus all my parts (I forget, but does $40 sound right?) in addition to the price of my TE.

I’m also a frugal person, so its more cost regret than anything else.


#9

Nothing wrong with buying a TE Stick below $150 or SFxT Stick below $160. For their price they are probably one of the top sticks on the market and for their parts it is worth buying. I myself just bought a Round 2 TE stick straight out as my starter and boy I have no regrets.


#10

Make sure that you really want a stick and that you personally think it will help you improve. Pad is the way that I play, and I have 2 sticks. I just know that I was playing much better on pad, then when I switched to stick, everything seemed different. I use a PSX pad with an xtokki converter for 360, and a PS3 pad on PS3. I believe it is smarter to go with what you are used to. Just my 2 cents.


#11

Crimson’s kinda right: it is smarter to go with what you’re used to if you’re primarily interested in performance. Everything seemed different for me when I switched to stick, but I gradually adapted and now have so much more fun playing stick than pad. I may be a better today if I’d stuck with pad, but I enjoy playing stick so much that it wouldn’t be worth it (for me)! :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:

As for which to get, I’d recommend (as many others have) at least the HORI VX-SA or V3-SA, or the MadCatz TE or PRO. The Qanba Q4/Eightarc Fusion are both good ideas, too, if you want dual-mod out of the box.

If you’re going to spend $200, the MadCatz V.S. is an unbelievable stick. It’s almost like a custom with a cord compartment.


#12

My first stick was a TE-S, and it was a little daunting at first. My execution suffered for about a month or so. If you decide to switch to stick, get something you know you’re going to be playing with for a long time, because each and every stick (for me at least) has little nuances that just “feel” different. I still have and am using my TE-S, but every time I play with anyone else stick, I drop combos and miss inputs. And as Vulpes said, there’s really no price drop, so if stick isn’t your thing, you can always re-sell it for around the same price you paid.


#13

This is exactly what I would recommend. Either buy one used as anything that typically could end up going wrong with it can be replaced for cheap.

And if you want to buy new I would DEFINITELY buy one that is already dual modded already so you can play on a PS3 or 360 as you never know what you’ll be playing on at some tournaments. I was in your situation a while back and I bought a Super SFIV Mad Catz TE Type-S and it’s been amazing for me. However, I’ve dropped another 100 bucks on it (give or take a bit) dual modding it and changing out some of the parts (button colors and ls-56 Seimitsu stick + octatgon gate).

I’d just get one of the new Qanba’s…the one WITHOUT the start button on the face plate (worst design decision ever) or go with one of the Eightarc dual modded sticks. Or something like Project Giantsword if you don’t mind dropping cash and want a more custom stick.


#14

The design is not bad. Maybe some people have terrible nerves in their hands that makes them hit the start button, because I have never, ever hit mine in the middle of a match. It is nice and convenient where it is. I don’t know why people complain about it.


#15

Go big or go home


#16

Might as well purchase a B15


#17

I’ve seen that start button be hit during a lot of matches. Sometimes the stick shifts in your lap or your hands don’t end up where you think they should be or maybe some of the people who have it happen to them are so used to reaching for it to restart a round (like you see for training mode). It’s just too convenient. It may not be a problem for you but it is for quite a few others.

Now if they put a delay on it where you had to hold it down for a second or two or had a switch to lock it to off then it would be better. But as is it’s sort of a liability. I believe the new Qanba design does not have the start button anywhere near the main buttons and is instead at the top of the stick as a smaller button.


#18

Yes, it will just leave you thinking you should have just bought a better one. Either that, or you feel like you should have just built a custom yourself instead, which is what happened to me.


#19

It 's honestly your opinion. If you want to try stick out, pick up a budget stick that is easily upgradable if necessary. This is great, but if you decide you want a real stick, it can be annoying and it will leave you with regret. If you buy a premium stick and you like it, you will be more satisfied with your purchase, however the opposite is also true. If you don’t like it, you will have more regret over your purchase.

Personally, I’d just buy a premium stick off the bat, but that’s what I did. Granted, I’ve played street fighter in arcades before console, so I was used to stick, I just needed a stick to use.

Now a lot of friends are looking to get their own sticks.

Just something to remember, just because most major players use a stick doesn’t mean it’s the only way to get better. It isn’t some magical saving grace that makes you 5x better the minute you open it, either. You have to relearn all of the movements, build up reaction in your fingers, etc. It may make you better in the long run in you stick with it, but it is no substitute for training and practice.

Who am I kidding though? Most of us in tech talk aren’t the best at execution in any games, so my advice shouldn’t be taken as law either.


#20

If you dont buy a expensive stick first than get one that is easy to mod and has a documented history of good mods. The WWE Brawlstick, the Qanba Professional Fighting Joystick (sometimes called the Q1), and the cheaper Hori’s have all been modded easily and have good PCB’s. I would say buy one of those and a replacement joystick to start. The reason being that the joystick will be the worst part of a cheap stick. For instance its extremely hard to hit diagonals on the Brawlstick/SE due to its shitty gate. A JLF will run you about twenty dollars and any of those previous sticks I listed will be between 30 and 70.

If you want to cover up the art on the Brawl, use 3M Di-Noc, its looks good, is very durable and cheap.

People are right when they say to lurk the trading area as well. Good sticks show up there for cheap all the time.