New to Akuma? Start Your Journey Here

akuma

#1

“Welcome to the World of Street Fighter III”

天Updates

• Overview updated [August 30th]
• Normals [September 1st]
• Specials [September 5th]
• Frames, Damage, and Stun values added to Normals and Specials [January 19th]
• Supers [January 21st]
• Combos [January 26th]
• Strategy [January 30th]

天Content

• Overview [Health/Strengths/Weaknesses]
Normals [Regular/Unique/Throws/Other]
Specials
Supers [Super Arts/Hidden Supers]
Combos [Beginner/Intermediate/Advanced]
Strategy [General Strategy/Pressure/Mix-ups]
• Videos [Kuroda/Uraken/Yuki Otoko/JR Rodigruez/Many More]
• Thanks [To all those who contributed]

天About the Guide (Please Read)

• All sprites are from Joram “ZweiFuss” Nowak
• Pictures used in the title include this one, this one, and this one
• All attacks will have their properties and basic strategy explained in the Normals, Specials, and Supers sections. They will all be explained more in depth in the Strategy section
• Specifics of each attack can be found in the spoiler below them
All values are from SRK.
Refer to the key below throughout the guide for an explanation on terms and the way values are laid out in each spoiler

[details=Spoiler]
• Startup***** [Number of frames it takes to start a move]
• Active***** [Number of frames a move can hit the opponent]
• Recovery [Number of frames it takes to recover (return to a neutral state) from a move]
• Frame Advantage on Block****** [Number of frames you recover faster (+) or slower (-) than your opponent if the move is blocked]
• on Hit****** [Number of frames you recover faster or slower than your opponent if the move hits]
• on Crouching Hit****** [Number of frames you recover faster or slower than your opponent if the move hits while they are crouching]
• Damage******* [Amount of damage a move does]¬
• Chip Damage******* [Amount of damage a move does if the opponent blocks it]¬
• Stun******* [Amount of stun a move does]¬
• Meter Build******** [Amount of meter built if a move whiffs/Amount of meter built if the move is blocked/Amount of meter built if the move hits]¬
• Throw Range [Amount of range a throw has]¬
• Parry [The way a move must be parried]

*****If the move has multiple hits, the values are separated by slashes (/) in order. It should also be noted that SFIII: 3S runs at 60 frames per second, so if a move has a 2 frame startup, it will start up in 2/60th of a second

******If Frame Adv. on Block is not shown, the move cannot be blocked. If Frame Adv. on Hit is not shown, the move puts the opponent in a downed state on hit. If Frame Adv. on Crouching Hit is not shown, the Frame Adv. on Hit and the Frame Advantage on Crouching Hit are the same

*******If the move has multiple hits, the values are separated by plus signs (+) in order

********If a move has multiple hits, the total value will be shown followed by the individual hits separated by plus signs (+) in parentheses. Meter gain on whiff, block, and hit are separated by slashes (/), as shown above. It should also be noted that Akuma has 112 pixels of meter to gain in order to fill up a whole bar

¬ Values shown are in pixels. Damage and Chip Damage refer to pixels taken away from your opponent’s life bar, Stun refers to pixels added to your opponent’s stun bar, and Meter Build refers to pixels added to your meter bars[/details]
This guide is meant to educate you on everything Akuma in Street Fighter III: Third Strike. I’ll do my best to describe every aspect of Akuma’s play in detail and as easy to understand as possible. This guide will be constantly growing due to the vast amount of information on this character that has been compiled over the decade of this game’s life span. You should know that not all of this information comes from me and there are links to where some information comes from throughout the guide, but there will be proper due given to those who indirectly contributed in a Thanks section I will be adding in later. I hope this guide helps those of you who are new to the game with getting on your feet, on those who are familiar with it with learning some new tactics and strategies. All in all, enjoy the guide and happy demoning!

Overview

Akuma is a rushdown character with a ton of mix-up potential. He has tools to make opponents guess whether to block not only high and low, but left and right as well. Pair this with zoning abilities rivaled only by few, and you have one solid character. Unfortunately, it couldn’t have just been left at that, so he was also given the curse of low stamina. In fact, Akuma has the lowest stamina in the entire game. As bad as that may seem, look at it this way. He’d only be given such low health for one reason, his offensive game is that good. If you’re into fast-paced, mix-up based pressure and mindgames, but are willing to die as fast as you kill, than the demon is the character for you.

Rundown

• Health***** [985]
• Stun Bar***** [56]
Tied with Remy for shortest
Takes 23 frames to recover one pixel
• Taunt [Increases damage of next combo by 43.8% and stun by 28.1%/Does not stack]
• Tier [7th, Upper]
Not too important, just something to know

*****In pixels

Arcade Colors

LP

MP

HP

LK

MK

HK

Console Colors [Hold Start]

LP

MP

HP

LK

MK

HK

Special Colors

LP + MK + HP

Super Mega Awesome Twelve Transformation

Strengths

• Excellent offense
• Mix-up potential is immense
• Zoning is superb*****
• Solid normals
• Good kara throw
• High damage potential
• Second fastest dash in the game
Tied with Elena, Ryu and Sean.
Only slower than Makoto

*****When I say zoning, I don’t mean keep away, I mean keeping your opponent where you want them. Sometimes when people hear zoning, the first thing that pops up into their head is keep away, but they aren’t exactly the same thing

Weaknesses

• Lowest Stamina in the game
• Tied for shortest stun bar
• No EX moves
• All Supers are same length (relatively long)
• Second slowest normal wake up time in the game
Tied with Ryu and Sean
Only faster than Chun-Li


#2

[LEFT] [/LEFT]
[LEFT]NormalsSpecialsSupersCombosStrategy[/LEFT]
[LEFT] [/LEFT]
[LEFT]If two sprites are present, the first sprite is when the attack is performed close to the opponent, the second sprite is far.[/LEFT]

Spoiler Key

[details=Spoiler]
• Startup***** [Number of frames it takes to start a move]
• Active***** [Number of frames a move can hit the opponent]
• Recovery [Number of frames it takes to recover (return to a neutral state) from a move]
• Frame Advantage on Block****** [Number of frames you recover faster (+) or slower (-) than your opponent if the move is blocked]
• on Hit****** [Number of frames you recover faster or slower than your opponent if the move hits]
• on Crouching Hit****** [Number of frames you recover faster or slower than your opponent if the move hits while they are crouching]
• Damage******* [Amount of damage a move does]¬
• Chip Damage******* [Amount of damage a move does if the opponent blocks it]¬
• Stun******* [Amount of stun a move does]¬
• Meter Build******** [Amount of meter built if a move whiffs/Amount of meter built if the move is blocked/Amount of meter built if the move hits]¬
• Throw Range [Amount of range a throw has]¬
• Parry [The way a move must be parried]

*****If the move has multiple hits, the values are separated by slashes (/) in order. It should also be noted that SFIII: 3S runs at 60 frames per second, so if a move has a 2 frame startup, it will start up in 2/60th of a second

******If Frame Adv. on Block is not shown, the move cannot be blocked. If Frame Adv. on Hit is not shown, the move puts the opponent in a downed state on hit. If Frame Adv. on Crouching Hit is not shown, the Frame Adv. on Hit and the Frame Advantage on Crouching Hit are the same

*******If the move has multiple hits, the values are separated by plus signs (+) in order

********If a move has multiple hits, the total value will be shown followed by the individual hits separated by plus signs (+) in parentheses. Meter gain on whiff, block, and hit are separated by slashes (/), as shown above. It should also be noted that Akuma has 112 pixels of meter to gain in order to fill up a whole bar

¬ Values shown are in pixels. Damage and Chip Damage refer to pixels taken away from your opponent’s life bar, Stun refers to pixels added to your opponent’s stun bar, and Meter Build refers to pixels added to your meter bars[/details]
**• Standing **

天 Light Punch (Jab)

Not many uses as a poke, but is a great tool for mix-ups and resets. The close version cannot chain, but it combos into the far version, which can. Not used too often in standard play, but it can thwart UOHs and some other pressure tactics due to its quick startup.

[details=Spoiler]Close:
Startup [3]
Active [3]
Recovery [5]
Frame Adv. on Block [+3]
on Hit [+3]
Damage [30]
Stun [3]
Meter Build [0/1/2]
Parry [High or Low][/details]

[details=Spoiler]Far:
Startup [4]
Active [3]
Recovery [4]
Frame Adv. on Block [+4]
on Hit [+4]
Damage [20]
Stun [3]
Meter Build [0/1/2]
Parry [High or Low][/details]

天Medium Punch (Strong)

Close: Can be used to tick throw, and as part of a frame trap. Not many uses aside from those two.
Far: Good meter builder and is a decent poke. Can be used to set up a dash quite effectively. Can also be special and super cancelled. Probably Akuma’s best standing normal, as its quick, leaves you in frame advantage, and does solid damage. Can be pretty annoying when placed properly, so learn its range and pick your spots wisely.

[details=Spoiler]Close:
Startup [5]
Active [4]
Recovery [10]
Frame Adv. on Block [+1]
on Hit [+2]
on Crouching Hit [+3]
Damage [115]
Stun [7]
Meter Build [2/4/8]
Parry [High][/details]

[details=Spoiler]Far:
Startup [5]
Active [4]
Recovery [9]
Frame Adv. on Block [+4]
on Hit [+5]
Damage [105]
Stun [11]
Meter Build [2/4/8]
Parry [High][/details]

天Hard Punch (Fierce)

Close: Good meaty attack, and has quick start up. Cancelable into Demon Flip (and other special moves) which leads to nice mix-ups. Although its Super Cancelable, it is harder to execute than some of his other meaty options as a hit confirm. Can also be used as a quick and damaging anti-air.
Far: Fairly good poke, does nice damage, and can catch your opponent off guard. Not to be abused, because of its long recovery time and its inability to cancel. Can also be used as an awkward long range anti-air for things like Necro’s dive kick and empty jump-ins, but its hit box is only near his hand, with his arm being completely hittable, so space properly and use sparingly.

[details=Spoiler]Close:
Startup [4]
Active [4]
Recovery [17]
Frame Adv. on Block [-4]
on Hit [-2]
on Crouching Hit [0]
Damage [135]
Stun [15]
Meter Build [3/6/14]
Parry [High][/details]

[details=Spoiler]Far:
Startup [8]
Active [5]
Recovery [22]
Frame Adv. on Block [-6]
on Hit [-4]
on Crouching Hit [-2]
Damage [140]
Stun [15]
Meter Build [3/6/14]
Parry [High][/details]

天Light Kick (Short)

Not many uses. Can be used as a quick poke, or in a blockstring, but overall, not very effective. Although it does hit low. Cannot be cancelled.

[details=Spoiler]Startup [4]
Active [4]
Recovery [7]
Frame Adv. on Block [+2]
on Hit [+2]
Damage [40]
Stun [3]
Meter Build [0/1/2]
Parry [High or Low][/details]

天Medium Kick (Forward)

Close: Great meaty attack and has quick start up. Can also be canceled into a Demon Flip (and any other special) for good mix-ups. What makes this better than a Standing Fierce as a meaty attack is that it is much easier to execute as a hit confirm into Super, although still difficult to master.
Far: Good poke, can catch your opponent off guard when they suspect they can’t be hit with any quick normal. Cannot cancel into anything, but its recovery frames aren’t awful. An effective poke, but should only be used at or near max range.

[details=Spoiler]Close:
Startup [4]
Active [5]
Recovery [11]
Frame Adv. on Block [+2]
on Hit [+4]
on Crouching Hit [+6]
Damage [115]
Stun [9]
Meter Build [2/4/8]
Parry [High][/details]

[details=Spoiler]Far:
Startup [5]
Active [5]
Recovery [17]
Frame Adv. on Block [-7]
on Hit [-6]
on Crouching Hit [-5]
Damage [95]
Stun [7]
Meter Build [2/4/8]
Parry [High][/details]

天Hard Kick (Roundhouse)

Close: Two hits. Can be used as an anti-air in certain situations, and easy to use as a meaty attack. Second hit must be blocked high. No follow ups afterwards as it can’t be cancelled, so all in all, not one of Akuma’s best normals.
-Far: Slow, but can be used well in certain situations and does good damage and stun. It can be used as a far range anti-air, and in some cases, a long range poke.

[details=Spoiler]Close:
Startup [5/7]
Active [3/5]
Recovery [19]
Blocked Adv. on Block [-6]
on Hit [-4]
on Crouching Hit [-2]
Damage [120+80(40)]
Stun 24 [13+11(7)]
Meter Build [4/8/16]
Parry [High or Low][/details]

[details=Spoiler]Far:
Startup [9]
Active [5]
Recovery [20]
Frame Adv. on Block [-7]
on Hit [-5]
on Crouching Hit [-3]
Damage [145]
Stun [11]
Meter Build [3/6/14]
Parry [High][/details]

• Crouching

天Light Punch (Jab)

Can be used quite effectively in the middle of a blockstring/hit confirm. Also chains into itself, and is ideal for resets with many tricky setups.

[details=Spoiler]Startup [4]
Hit Stun [3]
Active [4]
Frame Advantage on Block [+4]
on Hit [+4]
Damage [20]
Stun [3]
Meter Build [0/1/2]
Parry [High or Low][/details]

天Medium Punch (Strong)

Same animation as Crouching Jab, just slower and stronger. Best meter builder. Can be used effectively as a part of a frame trap, and can set up a dash nicely. Pay close attention to its parry properties, as it can be parried high, even though you’re crouching.

[details=Spoiler]Startup [5]
Active [4]
Recovery [7]
Frame Adv. on Block [+3]
on Hit [+4]
on Crouching Hit [+5]
Damage [95]
Stun [7]
Meter Build [2/4/8]
Parry [High or Low][/details]

天Hard Punch (Fierce)

Can be used as a solid anti-air, and has quick enough start up to be used as a powerful punish, but has some serious recovery time, so don’t abuse it and have it parried or whiff. Also doesn’t have much horizontal coverage, so don’t involve this in any poking whatsoever.

[details=Spoiler]Startup [5]
Active [5]
Recovery [19]
Frame Adv. on Block [-8]
on Hit [-6]
on Crouching Hit [-4]
Damage[135]
Stun [11]
Meter Build [3/6/14]
Parry [High or Low][/details]

天 Light Kick (Short)

Fantastic for hit confirming as it has decent range and can chain into itself. A frame slower than Crouching Jab, but has more range and is more consistent. Can also be used as a part of a blockstring, or as a tick throw. This will become your best friend.

[details=Spoiler]Startup [5]
Active [3]
Recovery [7]
Frame Adv. on Block [+1]
on Hit [+1]
Damage [20]
Stun [3]
Meter Build [0/1/2]
Parry [Low][/details]

天Medium Kick (Forward)

Great poke. Can be used to buffer, since its cancelable into all special attacks, even a Demon Flip, so mix-ups can stem from this quite nicely. Also can be used as a long range hit confirm for SAI, although it is also difficult to master. An overall great normal and your go-to poke.

[details=Spoiler]Startup [6]
Active [5]
Recovery [16]
Frame Adv. on Block [-3]
on Hit [-2]
on Crouching Hit [-1]
Damage [90]
Stun [3]
Meter Build [2/4/8]
Parry [Low][/details]

天Hard Kick (Roundhouse)

Sweep with some good range and fast start up, but it has a lot of recovery frames and can be punished easily if it’s abused, whiffed, and even blocked. If you sweep and your opponents jump simultaneously, you’ll most likely be being hit by their jump in attack, to give you a general idea of its recovery time, so use with caution.

[details=Spoiler]Startup [7]
Active [5]
Recovery [25]
Frame Advantage on Block [-15]
Damage [135]
Stun [3]
Meter build [3/6/14]
Parry [Low][/details]


#3

• Jumping

if two sprites are shown, the first is when performed during a neutral jump, the second during a diagonal jump.

天 Light Punch (Jab)

Not a very useful attack, aside from getting a quick air-to-air. Stays out until you land.

[details=Spoiler]Startup [4]
Active [Until landing]
Damage [40 (50 if neutral jumping)]
Stun [7]
Meter Build [0/1/2]
Parry [High][/details]

天 Medium Punch (Strong)

Neutral: Good for coming down on an opponent. Has less range than Jumping Forward, but does slightly more damage.
Diagonal: Solid attack, but should be replaced with Jumping Fierce in most situations.

[details=Spoiler]Startup [5]
Active [5]
Damage [90]
Stun [9]
Meter Building [2/4/8]
Parry [High][/details]

天 Hard Punch (Fierce)

Neutral: Not a very good attack. Can be used to beat a jump in attack from an opponent, but Jumping Forward or Roundhouse can get the job done much better.
Diagonal: Good combo starter. Jumping Roundhouse has more range, but Fierce does slightly more damage and stun, and if you plan on attacking with Fierce again when you land, then this may feel more comfortable.

[details=Spoiler]Startup [6]
Active [4 (3 if neutral jumping)]
Damage [130]
Stun [13]
Meter Build [3/6/14]
Parry [High][/details]

天 Light Kick (Short)

Same as Jumping Jab. Not very effective aside from a quick air-to-air. Can be used to style if you KO a juggled opponent.

[details=Spoiler]Startup [4]
Active [10 (19 if neutral jumping)]
Damage [40]
Stun [5]
Meter Build [0/1/2]
Parry [High][/details]

天 Medium Kick (Forward)

Neutral: Best attack to come down with, since it has the most range, although its slightly weaker than Jumping Strong. Also best for stopping jump ins.
[Diagonal] Solid attack in the fact that it is Akuma’s only viable cross up. It doesn’t dish out a lot of hit stun, so cross up deep with it to combo afterwards.

[details=Spoiler]Startup [5]
Active [6]
Damage [80]
Stun [7]
Meter Build [2/4/8]
Parry [High][/details]

天 Hard Kick (Roundhouse)

Neutral: Good in-air attack to stop jump-ins from your opponent. Has nice range and solid damage. Attacks at a slightly upward angle though.
Diagonal: Although slightly weaker than Jumping Fierce, this attack is ideal for starting combos due to its far range and solid damage.

[details=Spoiler]Startup [6]
Active [4 (5 if neutral jumping)]
Damage [120]
Stun [11]
Meter Build [3/6/14]
Parry [High][/details]

• Unique

天 Zugai Hasatsu [F+MP]

Great attack. Akuma’s alternate overhead that does more than twice the damage of a UOH, and hits twice as well. The special thing about this attack is that, although not intentional, it renders Akuma unthrowable, even by Hugo’s Gigas Breaker. Also used as Akuma’s best kara, for throws and Raging Demon.

[details=Spoiler]Startup [14]
Active [1]
Recovery [22]
Frame Adv. on Block [-1]
on Hit [+1]
on Crouching Hit [+3]
Damage [40+50]
Stun [9+7]
Meter Build [2+0/2+1/7+2]
Parry [High/High][/details]

天 Tenma Kuujin Kyaku [Jump D+MK]

Awesome attack, as its fast and can catch your opponent crouch blocking, since it must be blocked high, unlike the Demon Flip version. It also does a good amount of hit stun, allowing for some hefty damage. Many mix-ups can also stem from this attack, but it must be used at the apex of Akuma’s normal jump. To my understanding, if you super jump, you must only reach the height of his normal jump’s apex, not his super jump’s, allowing Akuma to reach this height quicker. So basically, you can perform this attack faster if you super jump instead of regular jump. Can also be used to travel a far distance in a short amount of time. It should be noted that the area this move hits the opponent effects your frame advantage. If you hit low on the opponent’s body, you are relatively safe and can continue attacking when you land, but if it hits high, you are almost always susceptible to be thrown. Same goes for just about any dive kick.

[details=Spoiler]Startup [8]
Active [Until landing]
Recovery [3]
Damage [90]
Stun [11]
Meter Build [2/4/8]
Parry [High][/details]

天 Target Combo [MP>HP ]
Two animations chain together

Not the most useful Target Combo, but does good damage. Must begin with a Close Standing Strong. The follow up will always be a Far Standing Fierce, and it still isn’t safe, so using it sparingly is probably too much.

[details=Spoiler]Startup [5]
Frame Adv. on Block [-12]
on Hit [-10]
on Crouching Hit [-8]
Damage [195 (115+80)]
Stun [10 (7+3)]
Meter Build [4+1/8+1](Only second and third values are shown because a target combo cannot be performed if the first hit whiffs)[/details]

• Throws

天 Seoi Nage

Akuma’s forward throw. This move makes the opponent land right in front of you, a step away from being in throw range again, although it should be noted that you are able to quick roll throws in this game. When your opponent quick rolls this throw, a dash will put you back in throw range. Does less stun than the backwards version.

[details=Spoiler]Startup [2]
Active [1]
Recovery [21]
Damage [110]
Stun [9]
Throw Range [24] (44 when kara-canceled from forward + MP)[/details]

天 Tomoe Nage

Akuma’s backwards throw. This variant will send your opponent across the screen. Three dashes and you will be back in throw range, and a quick roll will take three dashes and a step. It’ll be more effective to super jump and then dash on landing to reach the opponent though. A dive kick mid-jump will speed up the process. Does more stun than the forward version.

[details=Spoiler]Startup [2]
Active [1]
Recovery [21]
Damage [110]
Stun [9]
Throw Range [24] (44 when kara-canceled from forward + MP)[/details]

• Other

天 Forward Dash

Akuma’s forward dash may not move the farthest, but it is one of the fastest in the game, at 13 frames of animation. This speed is great for setting up dash ins that can lead to a throw, a Crouching Light hit confirm, a Raging Demon, and more. Mixing these set-ups together can lead to powerful mix-ups, especially when this dash is performed after a blocked normal, such as a Crouching Strong or a blocked Crouching Light hit confirm.

天 Back Dash

Not much can be said about this move. It has one of the fastest start ups at 13 frames, but moves at the shortest distance in the game, tied with many others. The only practical uses this move can have are during footsies, as you can move out of the range of a specific normal quickly, and after a dive kick, to bait a throw tech. Other than those, this move shouldn’t be used too often. If you really wanna back up quickly, you should use one of Akuma’s teleports.

天 Taunt [HP+HK]

Akuma’s taunt gives his next hit or combo a 43.8% damage boost and a 28.1% stun boost. Unfortunately, this taunt cannot stack, so using it multiple times will not get more damage. It should also be noted that the move has a total of 66 frames of animation, over a full second. It also does not hit the opponent itself. It does however give you 4 pixels of meter. Can also be canceled from any normal that is special-cancelable.

Spoiler information from SRK.


#4

NormalsSpecialsSupersCombosStrategy

All inputs are performed when Akuma is facing right

Spoiler Key

[details=Spoiler]• Startup***** [Number of frames it takes to start a move]
• Active***** [Number of frames a move can hit the opponent]
• Recovery [Number of frames it takes to recover (return to a neutral state) from a move]
• Frame Advantage on Block****** [Number of frames you recover faster (+) or slower (-) than your opponent if the move is blocked]
• on Hit****** [Number of frames you recover faster or slower than your opponent if the move hits]
• on Crouching Hit****** [Number of frames you recover faster or slower than your opponent if the move hits while they are crouching]
• Damage******* [Amount of damage a move does]¬
• Chip Damage******* [Amount of damage a move does if the opponent blocks it]¬
• Stun******* [Amount of stun a move does]¬
• Meter Build******** [Amount of meter built if a move whiffs/Amount of meter built if the move is blocked/Amount of meter built if the move hits]¬
• Throw Range [Amount of range a throw has]¬
• Parry [The way a move must be parried]

*****If the move has multiple hits, the values are separated by slashes (/) in order. It should also be noted that SFIII: 3S runs at 60 frames per second, so if a move has a 2 frame startup, it will start up in 2/60th of a second

******If Frame Adv. on Block is not shown, the move cannot be blocked. If Frame Adv. on Hit is not shown, the move puts the opponent in a downed state on hit. If Frame Adv. on Crouching Hit is not shown, the Frame Adv. on Hit and the Frame Advantage on Crouching Hit are the same

*******If the move has multiple hits, the values are separated by plus signs (+) in order

********If a move has multiple hits, the total value will be shown followed by the individual hits separated by plus signs (+) in parentheses. Meter gain on whiff, block, and hit are separated by slashes (/), as shown above. It should also be noted that Akuma has 112 pixels of meter to gain in order to fill up a whole bar

¬ Values shown are in pixels. Damage and Chip Damage refer to pixels taken away from your opponent’s life bar, Stun refers to pixels added to your opponent’s stun bar, and Meter Build refers to pixels added to your meter bars[/details]
Gou Hadouken [QCF+P]

天Ground

As a quick note, in Third Strike, projectiles don’t carry the same value as they do in other Street Fighter games, mostly because of Third Strike’s parry system, but that isn’t to say they have no value at all. It just may be different then what its perceived to be. Akuma can use this projectile a few different ways. One method is to use it as the bridge between a normal and a super. For example, you could do Cr. MK (Crouching Medium Kick) into Gou Hadouken into SA1 (Super Art 1). This can be used to either help lengthen your time to hit confirm, or just help with execution. Regardless, placing a fireball before a super can be a great help, but it usually can, and should, be replaced with a Gou Shoryuken, so let’s move on to a use that’s specific to this attack. Akuma’s Gou Hadouken can also be used as a long range poke in some situations. For example, if you and your opponent are playing footsies (moving in and out of the range of each other’s normals), landing a fireball in this confrontation can either A.) make your opponent want to jump or look to parry or B.) make your opponent make a quicker decision with his poke, in an effort to beat the start up of your fireball. If your opponent has to make a quicker decision with his poke, he may not be able to get into the range he would like, limiting the amount of normals he can use and increasing your chance of making a good read/parry. Although this is a relatively small portion of your footsie game, it always helps to have one more tool to use. Let me outright say that Akuma’s ground fireball, or any for that matter, should not be used extensively, no matter what its intent is.

[details=Spoiler]Button used determines the speed, with Jab being the slowest and Fierce being the fastest, but all versions start up and recover at the same time.

  • Damage [ LP: 60 MP: 60 HP: 60]
  • Chip Damage [ LP: 4 MP: 4 HP: 4]
  • Stun [ LP: 3 MP: 3 HP: 3]
  • Startup [ LP: 7 MP: 7 HP: 7]
  • Active [ LP: 1 MP: 1 HP: 1]
  • Recovery [ LP: 38 MP: 38 HP: 38]
  • Frame Adv. on Block [ LP: -11 MP: -11 HP: -11]
  • on Hit [ LP: -10 MP: -10 HP: -10]
  • Meter Build [ LP: 0/1/1 MP: 0/1/1 HP: 0/1/1]
  • Parry [All versions must be parried high][/details]

天Air (Zankuu Hadouken)

If you’re new to Akuma, then this is probably your favorite/most frequently used move. Although its effective, it has its weaknesses, just like any other attack, but we’ll discuss the strengths first. This move can be used in a number of ways. One method is as a defensive tool. Jumping backwards and throwing one of these out can help you slow down your opponents offense, if you predict a jump-in. This strategy unfortunately has more negatives than positives, but we’ll get to that in a second. Another use this attack has is its ability to provide a mix up/pressure. For example, if you neutral jump when an opponent is waking up, you can either A.) throw a fireball and set up a combo if it hits, or an overhead, Cr. LK hit confirm, or Demon Flip cancel from a normal if its blocked or B.) not throw a fireball and mess with your opponents attempt to parry, which sets up a low attack (since it must be parried high) or scare them to block, which sets up a throw. This might all sound fine and dandy, but these methods also come with risks. If you attempt the first method, the jump back fireball, you are only benefiting if the fireball hits the opponent while they’re mid-air. If they jump in at you looking for a parry, and get it on your fireball, you’ve essentially just positioned yourself closer to the corner. If you attempt this while your opponent is on the ground, they can jump on reaction, or dash under it, leaving yourself vulnerable. This tactic is helpful in some matchups against characters who have a hard time dealing with zoning, but ultimately, this tactic should be used sparingly, and only when you are sure they will attempt a jump in attack and you’re having trouble dealing with it, because it does knock them down on an air-to-air hit. One more thing about this tactic is that if you are in the corner, don’t… and I mean don’t, ever attempt this. Your opponent can just take a step forward and wait for you to land and break your vulnerable face with any combo they so choose. If you really know they’re going to jump, and you’re in that position, you should just dash when they jump and get yourself out of the corner. The issues with the second method (setting up a mix up) is that if they guess right, there are some consequences. If they parry your fireball, you don’t necessarily have frame advantage and if you did it too early, you’ll be punished. It should be done right before you land to minimize risk and shouldn’t be used jumping forward too often, unless your opponent is constantly using anti-airs and you’re having a tough time parry them. Neutral jumping and jumping backwards are this tactic’s sweet spot, so use it in these positions often. All in all, this tactic is effective, but it needs to be mastered in order to minimize its risks.

[details=Spoiler]All strengths come out at the same angle.

  • Damage [ LP: 60 MP: 60 HP: 60]
  • Chip Damage [ LP: 4 MP: 4 HP: 4]
  • Stun [ LP: 3 MP: 3 HP: 3]
  • Startup [ LP: 11 MP: 11 HP: 11]
  • Active [ LP: 1 MP: 1 HP: 1]
  • Recovery [ LP: 7 MP: 7 HP: 7]
  • Meter Build [LP: 0/1/1 MP: 0/1/1 HP: 0/1/1]
  • Parry [All versions must be parried high][/details]

Gou Shoryuken [F,D,DF+P]
Sprite shown is the Hard version

Dragon Punches also play a different role in Third Strike, but it isn’t as severely changed as fireballs, they just have their role as an anti-air lessened, due to parrying. With that being said, Gou Shoryuken can be used in other ways, but not many. Same as the Gou Hadouken, it can be used in between a normal and a super for a longer time to hit confirm, or to help with execution. This is preferred over a fireball because it can do twice as much damage. Also, Gou Shoryuken is good in your Bread & Butters, if you plan on using a Super at the end, but in most other cases, it should be replaced with Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku. Of course, it’s also an extremely high priority attack with its invincibility frames on start up and large hitbox, so it can stuff nearly every attack, but due to its long recovery time, this tactic shouldn’t be used often, and if you really know an attack is coming, try to go for the parry instead, or block if you’re not as certain.

[details=Spoiler]Strength determines height, Jab having the shortest reach, while Fierce has the highest.

  • Damage [ LP: 130 MP: 150(100+50) HP: 180(60+60+60)]
  • Chip Damage [ LP: 16(13) MP: 19(13+6) HP: 24(8+8+8)]
  • Stun [ LP: 11(9) MP: 19(13+6) HP: 15(11+3+3)]
  • Start up [ LP: 3 MP: 2 HP: 1]
  • Active [ LP: 14 MP: 2/5 HP: 2/2/19]
  • Recovery [ LP: 26 MP: 41 HP: 35]
  • Frame Adv. on Block [ LP: -24 MP: -30 HP: -34]
  • Meter build [ LP: 3/10/15 MP: 3/11(10+1)/17(15+2) HP: 3/12(10+1+1)/19(15+2+2)]
  • Parry [All can be parried high or low, on every hit][/details]

Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [QCB+K]
Sprite shown is the Hard version

天Ground

Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku is a great move for Akuma offensively, and even defensively. Akuma can utilize this attack in several ways. One comes from the light version of this attack, which puts the opponent in a juggle state on hit and allows you to recover in time to follow up with an attack. This can lead to an air reset mix up, or more damage, following up with a Gou Shoryuken, a Super or even another Tatsumaki. The drawback is that it wiffs on crouching opponents, so make sure they’re standing or you can be punished easily. The medium version also sends the opponent into a juggle state, along with the Hard version, but the Medium variation hits twice and can be followed up with a MP Gou Shoryuken, or in some cases, a HK Tatsumaki, although both of these require strict timing. The Hard kick version cannot be followed up, unless very specific conditions are met, but this move is a great combo ender, especially after an LK tatsu juggle, since it does good damage and sends the opponent flying. Both of these versions, unlike the Light variation, hit crouching opponents, and aren’t as easy to punish. Both of these versions also start up extremely quickly, so they can be used in tight situations when on defense. Keep in mind that they can still both be punished, and they lack the invincibility the Gou Shoryuken has, so it isn’t as strong as a defensive option.

[details=Spoiler]Strength determines number of spins, with Short hitting once, while Roundhouse can hit up to three times.

  • Damage [ LK: 100 MK: 120(90+30) HK: 150(90+30+30)]
  • Chip Damage [ LK: 6 MK: 15(11+2) HK: 17(11+2+2)]
  • Stun [ LK: 7 MK: 10(7+3) HK: 13(7+3+3)]
  • Startup [ LK: 11 MK: 2 HK: 2]
  • Active [ LK: 2 MK: 2 HK: 2]
  • Recovery [ LK: 17 MK: 16 HK: 10]
  • Frame Adv. on Block [ LK: -12 MK: -8 HK: -5]
  • Meter Gain [ LK: 3/8/13 MK: 3/9(8+1)/15(13+2) HK: 3/10(8+1+1)/17 (13+2+2)]
  • Parry [All versions must be parried high throughout][/details]

天Air

The air version is also a great move in Akuma’s arsenal. If this move connects, it puts the opponent in a juggle state, just like the ground version, except the move can be followed up no matter what strength is used. This can lead to mix-ups or more damage as well. It starts up at about the same frames as most Medium air attacks, so its decent air-to-air. It can also be used to mess with your opponents parry timing if they are parrying your SA1 while they are airborne. The reason why this attack shouldn’t be used too often is because if you perform this move as soon as you jump, in anticipation of your opponents’, and they stay on the ground, they can punish you when you land without having to worry about being hit, so use it when you are feeling confident rather than feeling lucky.

[details=Spoiler]- Damage [ LK: 80 MK: 160(80+80) HK: 240(80+80+80)]

  • Chip Damage [ LK: 5 MK: 5 HK: 5] (Only one hit can get blocked for each)
  • Stun [ LK: 3 MK: 8(3+5) HK: 11(3+5+3)]
  • Startup [ LK: 5 MK: 5 HK: 5]
  • Active [ LK: 2 MK: 2 HK: 2]
  • Meter Build [ LK: 1/1/7 MK: 2/1/9(7+2) HK: 4/1/16(7+2+7)]
  • Parry [All versions must be parried high throughout][/details]

Shakunetsu Hadouken [HCF+P]
Sprite shown is the Light version

This attack has very little use in Akuma’s gameplay. The Light version is relatively quick, but only does one hit. The Hard version is powerful and does three hits, but the start up is extremely slow. The medium version takes a little bit from both. This attack can be useful for two reasons. One, it delivers a knockdown on hit with all versions. This can help set up a mix up or stop an opponents offense, although this is most likely one of the least effective ways to do so. Also, this method should only be performed with the Light version. Two, and the more effective method, is to chip your opponent on wake up. Although the Gou Shoryuken does more chip, you must be close to the opponent and if its parried, you’re extremely unsafe. With the Shakunetsu Hadouken, you can chip from anywhere, and if its parried, you’re safe, because by the time your opponent parries all three hits, you’ll not only recover in time, but are free enough to set up your next attack. This method should of course only be performed with the Hard variation. Ultimately, this attack is best for the second method, especially since it can be super cancelled, so paired with an SA1, and it proves to be a powerful way to chip your opponent to death. Its also to be noted that no matter what version is used, it will still be cancelled out by a regular hadouken, and be plowed through by an EX version. Not sure if this is the correct terminology, but the Shakunetsu Hadouken only has one durablity point, not two if you use the Medium version or three for the Hard, seen in the SFIV series. So even if, for some odd reason, you’re in a fireball war, this move wouldn’t prove helpful.

[details=Spoiler]Strength determines the startup time and number of hits, with Jab coming out the fastest while only hitting once, and Fierce coming out the slowest but hitting three times.

  • Damage [ LP: 50 MP: 100(50+50) HP: 150(50+50+50)]
  • Chip Damage [ LP: 3 MP: 3+3 HP: 3+3+3]
  • Stun [ LP: 3 MP: 3+3 HP: 3+3+3]
  • Startup [ LP: 13 MP: 17 HP: 21]
  • Active [ LP: 1 MP: 1 HP: 1]
  • Recovery [ LP: 42 MP: 43 HP: 44]
  • Frame Advantage on Block [ LP: -23 MP: -18 HP: -15]
  • Meter Build [ LP: 0/1/1 MP: 0/2(1+1)/2(1+1) HP: 0/3(1+1+1)/3(1+1+1)]
  • Parry [All versions must be parried high][/details]

#5

Ashura Senkuu [ F,D,DF+PP or KK] [B,D,DB+PP or KK]
Sprite shown is the forward kick version

This move is helpful in many situations, but is a risk to use and therefore should not be relied on. Being a teleport, and the only one in the game, it is invincible from the first frame activated, until it is finished. This is especially effective when waking up, but there are a few problems with this technique. First, if the opponent is performing a meaty attack, this move must be performed as a reversal, which is a relatively small window, and if your timing is off, you’ll be eating whatever combo your opponent had in store, something you don’t want to be doing with the most fragile character in the game. Also, characters who can stand a distance and still apply pressure (such as Chun-Li or Dudley) should not be teleported against since they can punish easily, because of the Ashura Senkuu’s recovery time. Akuma can also be hit during his teleport by some supers, such as Ken’s SA3 (Shippu Jinrai Kyaku) and Hugo’s SA1 (Gigas Breaker), while supers like Sean’s SA1 (Hadou Burst) and Ryu’s SA1 (Shinkuu Hadouken) have an easy time punishing it from full screen. All in all, this move can prove helpful in tight situations, but because of weaknesses explained above, it should be used sparingly, and should definitely not be depended on.

[details=Spoiler]Direction of DP (Dragon Punch, or Shoryuken) motion determines which way Akuma will teleport. Using a punch button teleports Akuma full screen in the chosen direction, and using a kick button will teleport him half screen in the direction you choose.

  • Startup [ PP: 20 KK: 20]
  • Active [ PP: 46 KK: 30]
  • Recovery [ PP: 9 KK: 9][/details]

Hyakki Shuu [F,D,DF+K]
*Sprite shown is the Hyakku Gousai *

Akuma’s Demon Flip. Due to this moves complexity and depth, it will have its own segment in the Strategy section, but its properties will be briefly explained here. After this move is performed you can…

  • Press any kick and perform a dive kick. Does good hit stun and is the safest option to use, but does not hit high.
  • Press any punch and perform a palm strike. An overhead, and causes knockdown on hit, but unfortunately it has bad recovery time on block, so it isn’t very effective.
  • Press LP+LK and perform a throw. An effective move, especially on tall characters, great for catching an opponent blocking in anticipation of an attack, but it doesn’t have the biggest range, so you must space this properly. If this move whiffs, there’s some serious recovery time.
  • Press nothing and perform a slide. A low attack, and causes a knockdown. This move is the same as the Palm Strike, in the sense that its a 50/50, but it doesn’t do much damage, and if its blocked, the recovery time is substantial. Should be used sparingly.

[details=Spoiler]The button used to perform this move determines its trajectory, with the LK version going a short distance, the MK version going a little further than a regular jump, and the HK version going about 3/4 the screen. A follow up cannot be performed on Akuma initial launch, but after that, a button can be pressed at any time, altering the arrival of your attack.

天 Hyakki Shuu [Demon Flip]

  • Active [36]

天 Hyakku Goujin [Dive Kick]

  • Damage [100]
  • Chip Damage [13]
  • Stun [11]
  • Start up [9]
  • Active [Until landing]
  • Recovery [3]
  • Meter Build [3/6/14]
  • Parry [High]

天 Hyakku Goushou [Palm Strike]

  • Damage [110]
  • Chip Damage [16]
  • Stun [13]
  • Startup [10]
  • Active [3]
  • Recovery [17]
  • Meter Build [3/6/14]
  • Parry [High]

天 Hyakku Gousai [Throw]

  • Damage [110]
  • Stun [15]
  • Startup [3]
  • Active [2]
  • Recovery [17]
  • [0/7] (Only first and last value shown because this move cannot be blocked)

天 Hyakku Gouzan [Slide]

  • Damage [100]
  • Chip Damage [13]
  • Stun [3]
  • Startup [41]
  • Active [15]
  • Recovery [13]
  • Frame Adv. on Block [-11]
  • Meter Build [3/6/14]
  • Parry [Low][/details]

#6

NormalsSpecialsSupersCombosStrategy

All inputs are performed when Akuma is facing right

Spoiler Key

[details=Spoiler]• Startup***** [Number of frames it takes to start a move]
• Active***** [Number of frames a move can hit the opponent]
• Recovery [Number of frames it takes to recover (return to a neutral state) from a move]
• Frame Advantage on Block****** [Number of frames you recover faster (+) or slower (-) than your opponent if the move is blocked]
• on Hit****** [Number of frames you recover faster or slower than your opponent if the move hits]
• on Crouching Hit****** [Number of frames you recover faster or slower than your opponent if the move hits while they are crouching]
• Damage******* [Amount of damage a move does]¬
• Chip Damage******* [Amount of damage a move does if the opponent blocks it]¬
• Stun******* [Amount of stun a move does]¬
• Meter Build******** [Amount of meter built if a move whiffs/Amount of meter built if the move is blocked/Amount of meter built if the move hits]¬
• Throw Range [Amount of range a throw has]¬
• Parry [The way a move must be parried]

*****If the move has multiple hits, the values are separated by slashes (/) in order. It should also be noted that SFIII: 3S runs at 60 frames per second, so if a move has a 2 frame startup, it will start up in 2/60th of a second

******If Frame Adv. on Block is not shown, the move cannot be blocked. If Frame Adv. on Hit is not shown, the move puts the opponent in a downed state on hit. If Frame Adv. on Crouching Hit is not shown, the Frame Adv. on Hit and the Frame Advantage on Crouching Hit are the same

*******If the move has multiple hits, the values are separated by plus signs (+) in order

********If a move has multiple hits, the total value will be shown followed by the individual hits separated by plus signs (+) in parentheses. Meter gain on whiff, block, and hit are separated by slashes (/), as shown above. It should also be noted that Akuma has 112 pixels of meter to gain in order to fill up a whole bar

¬ Values shown are in pixels. Damage and Chip Damage refer to pixels taken away from your opponent’s life bar, Stun refers to pixels added to your opponent’s stun bar, and Meter Build refers to pixels added to your meter bars[/details]

Super Art I: Messatsu Gou Hadou [QCF, QCF+P]

Sprite is not available. Images from SRK.

Widely considered as Akuma’s best super because of its versatility and ability to combo. When performed, Akuma unleashes a giant Gou Hadouken across the screen with multiple hit. This move can be performed on the ground and in the air. The air version (Tenma Gou Zankuu) does slightly more damage, comes out at 45° angle and travels at about the same speed as an HP air fireball. The ground version moves at about the same speed as a fierce fireball as well, but both have the same properties no matter what button is pressed. Although its speed might not be the best, it has quite the hitbox, due to its large size, but there are many more strengths to this super art besides its basic properties. It can punish full screen in some situations (something the others cannot), the air version makes for a very damaging air to air attack, it is the best to use in combos (gets full hits in a juggle), and this super can deal a good amount of chip damage, especially when canceled from an HP Shakunetsu Hadouken (red fireball). It also has the least amount of recovery time of all his supers and can be used twice in the same combo, but this isn’t recommended due to damage scaling. Above all, the biggest reason why this super is preferred is because it’s dependable to hit confirm with, and has the most normals available to hit confirm out of. This reason alone is enough to use this super, but with its other options as well, this super is a cut above the rest. All in all, SAI is the only super you will see used in competitive play for good reasons.

[details=Spoiler]Messatsu Gou Hadou (Ground):
Startup [2]
Active [1]
Recovery [49]
Frame Adv. on Block [-13]
Damage [290](When all 6 hits connect)
Chip Damage [19](When all 6 hits connect)
Stun [0]
Parry [All hit must be parried high][/details]

[details=Spoiler]Tenma Gou Zanku (Air):
Startup [7]
Active [1]
Recovery [13]
Frame Adv. on Block [-49]
Damage [320](When all hits connect)
Chip Damage [25](When all hits connect)
Stun [0]
Parry [All hits must be parried high][/details]

Super Art II: Messatsu Gou Shoryu [QCF, QCF+P]

Akuma’s second best super to use, but it’s just that, second best. It does the same animation and damage no matter what button is pressed. This super lives in the shadows of SAI, but it still has some redeeming qualities. One of which is its ability to chip, as it does the most out of all his Super Arts. It is also the only one of his Super Arts that do stun. Most notable though is the fact that it has a one frame startup. Although extremely fast, the first hit has little range (it seems the animation is two Light Gou Shoryukens followed by a Fierce one). With it’s small range, this super is limited to close up normals to hit confirm and punish with. Regardless, this super is still more powerful than SAI, but you are ultimately trading viable hit confirms and combo ability for damage. This super does not get the full hits on a juggle, where a lot of Akuma’s damage comes from, so the trade off becomes even worse. Most of the time you will get the first Shoryu, and then your opponent will juggle above the second, and come down for the third. All in all, SAII has great damage and has an extremely fast startup, but its inability to combo fully in some situations and its lack of hit confirms keeps this super beneath SAI, in more ways than one.

[details=Spoiler]Startup [1]
Active [2]
Recovery [39]
Frame Adv. on Block [-25]
Damage [390](When all hits connect)
Chip Damage [44](When all hits connect)
Stun [14](When all hits connect)
Parry [All hits can be parried either high or low][/details]

Super Art III: Messatsu Gou Rasen [QCF, QCF+K]
Sprite not available. Image from SRK. Image shown is ground version.

If you haven’t noticed, Akuma’s supers become less effective the further you go down the list, with SAI arguably being the best, and SAIII widely considered to be the worst. This super is by far the most stylish, but unfortuntely, the positives start to run short from there. It is composed of a Standing Forward and then 9 Tatsumaki Zankuukyakus as Akuma launches into the air, followed by a Jumping Forward and a Jumping Roundhouse, and also does not change with whatever strength is used to activate. This super can be performed in the air (Messatsu Gou Senpuu) and can be special canceled while airborne, and unlike SAI, Messatsu Gou Senpuu will combo when canceled from an Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku, which is quite nice to pull off. The ground super does the same amount of damage as SAII (both above SAI) and the air version is Akuma’s most damaging Super Art, slightly more damaging than the ground variant, but it also shares some of SAII’s flaws. First to be noted is that this super does not juggle fully as well, Although it still retains some core damage, sometimes the first hits miss because the opponent is too high, or other times the opponent falls out before the last hits connect. SAIII does have some ways to combo into it, but because of its lack in range, these combos and hit confirms become more difficult. It also has the least amount of hit confirms out of the three and is the most unsafe. Ultimately, this super wins in the style department, but lacks in every other aspect.

[details=Spoiler]Messatsu Gou Rasen (Ground):
Startup [4]
Active [2]
Recovery [51]
Frame Adv. on Block [-35]
Damage [390](When all hits connect)
Chip Damage [15] (Values of first three hits because these are the only ones that can be blocked)
Stun [0]
Parry [All hits must be parried high][/details]

[details=Spoiler]Messatsu Gou Senpuu (Air):
Startup [9]
Active [1]
Recovery [51]
Frame Adv. on Block [-35]
Damage [405](When all hits connect)
Chip Damage [15](Values of first three hits because these are the only ones that can be blocked)
Stun [0]
Parry [All hits must be parried high][/details]

Shun Goku Satsu [ LP>LP>F>LK>HP]
Sprite shown is when Akuma ends the round with Shun Goku Satsu

Better known as the Raging Demon, it is one of two supers Akuma has at his disposable regardless of which Super Art is selected. This super can only be performed when you have full meter (2 bars filled), but it is worth every pixel. When the commands are inputted, Akuma begins to glide across the screen in his teleport animation (with only one sprite) and if he makes contact with the opponent, the screen will go black and a 15 hit combo will be unleashed in darkness, only for the screen to return with Akuma standing in the sprite above with the opponent grounded. Although the animation is sweet, this move’s properties are what really make it a fantastic super. First to be noted is that it can be canceled from any ground move Akuma has, including all of his normals and his fireballs. This super is also a grab, which means you can’t hit someone that is in the air, or is in hit/block stun, but means it cannot be blocked, and it has a one frame startup as well. Put these three properties together and the Raging Demon has setups that can only be escaped if the opponent jumps away before the super flashes. Regularly, when this move is performed, the opponent can jump away after the flash to avoid the grab, but when used properly, the opponent cannot escape if they were blocking before you input the Shun Goku Satsu. The most famous of these setups is known as a Kara Demon, as you kara Akuma’s command overhead into the Raging Demon when at point-blank range. The overhead moves Akuma closer to the opponent, making the grab inescapable due to its one frame startup.While these are all great properties to have, they are all given much more value by the Raging Demon’s great damage, which does much more than his regular Super Arts. All in All, Shun Goku Satsu is an extremely powerful super that can catch opponents blocking and dish out massive amounts of damage while changing the flow of a match in an instant.

[details=Spoiler]Startup [1]
Active [38]
Recovery [2]
Damage [490]
Throw Range [12](in pixels)[/details]

Kongou Kokuretsu Zan [D, D, D+PPP]

Take the first letter of each word and you have this super’s more common name, the KKZ. This along with the Raging Demon can be used with which ever Super Art you choose, giving Akuma three supers to use during a match. Like its counterpart, the KKZ requires 2 full bars to perform and is the most damaging super in the game. Alongside its incredible power, Akuma is fully invincible for a ridiculous amount of time, beginning at start up. These properties allow it to plow through every move in the game while draining half of most characters health in the process. It also does significant chip damage, guaranteeing a victory in some situations. Unfortunately, the KKZ also has its downsides. First of which is its extremely long startup. If you look at the sprite above, Akuma raising his hand is the super flash, and the next movement to the ground slam is all regular game time, allowing your opponent to jump away and dodge every hit. This move also only has one reliable way to combo into it, and the timing varies between characters. The combo also reduces the amount of damage the KKZ does because it loses some hits and is done while the opponent is air resetting, which reduces the damage of supers. Now you may be wondering, how does a combo involve an air reset? Well, they don’t, as the KKZ combo isn’t an actual combo, but another one of its properties is that the initial hit cannot be parried. This means that if you force the opponent to air reset and get the KKZ to hit them while they’re still airborne, they cannot avoid the damage. Although this super is more accessible than the Kara Demon, it is easily avoided and two SAIs may be more helpful in battle, but if your opponent slips up and throws out something that they shouldn’t have, especially on your wake up, break a mountain straight though it and take the upper hand by all means.

[details=Spoiler]Startup [16]
Active [6]
Recovery [58]
Frame Adv. on Block [-28]
Damage [640](When all hits connect)
Chip Damage [126](When all hits connect)
Stun [26](When all hits connect)
Parry [First hit cannot be parried, the rest can be parried either high or low][/details]


#7

NormalsSpecialsSupersCombosStrategy

These combos can have their starters replaced if they are Medium or Hard attacks. Usually with Standing Forward, Standing Fierce, Crouching Strong, and Crouching Forward. Dive Kicks, Medium and Hard jump-in attacks, and Air Fireballs can also be added to the beginning. It should also be noted that these are not all of Akuma’s combos, just ones that will give you an idea on how combos work with him. All Standing normals are the Close versions. Details of the combos can be found in the spoilers. A key of notations and the like can be found below.

[details=Spoiler]• xx [The previous move must be cancelled into the next move]

• > [The next move must be linked from the previous move]

• [Button Strength] [Button determines what strength to use with a special. So Gou Shoryuken [ :punch-medium: ] is a MP Gou Shoyuken]

• (While Opponent’s Airborne) [Combo is performed on an opponent in mid-air. Some of these combos can be performed while the opponent is grounded as well. Check the spoiler information for these details]

• (Air Reset) [At this point in time in the combo the opponent will air reset]

• Dash [At this point in time in the combo you should perform a dash]

• Beginner [Combos in this section can be performed with little practice]

• Intermediate [Combos in this section have more of a learning curve, but can be performed with a fair amount of practice]

• Advanced [Combos in this section are either impractical or require strict timing and reactions. These combos range from quite difficult to extremely difficult and are usually only seen in very high level play][/details]

• Meterless

- Beginner

→ Standing MK xx Gou Shoryuken [HP]

Spoiler

Simple combo, but does good damage, and works really well after a dive kick. With the dive kick, this combo can lead to about half stun.

→ Standing HP xx Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK]

Spoiler

Decent combo, and a reliable punish, although it’s mostly just here to show it’s possible.

→ Crouching HP xx Shankunetsu Hadouken [LP]

Spoiler

Impractical, but pretty nifty. Don’t think you’ll ever use this one, but it’s interesting to know you can combo into a Shankunetsu Hadouken.

→ Crouching MK xx Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [LK] > Gou Shoryuken [HP]

Spoiler

The go-to combo for Akuma, although it shouldn’t be. Does real solid damage, and some decent stun, but remember, your opponent recovers quicker from a Gou Shoryuken than a Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku, and this combo also doesn’t provide the corner carry the following combo does. This combo does do slightly more damage on the other hand.

→ Crouching MK xx Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [LK] > Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK]

Spoiler

Simple but effective combo. Does less damage than ending with a Gou Shoryuken, but it downs your opponent for a little longer and, most importantly, sends your opponent a good distance across the screen. If you end this combo with a Gou Shoryuken, you are essentially trading better positioning for a little more damage. Best beginner combo out of the bunch.

→ (While Opponent’s Airborne) Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK] > Gou Shoryuken [HP]

Spoiler

The go-to when landing an Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku. The Gou Shoryuken follow up leads to nice damage and is better than the Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku as an ender in this case because it is much easier to combo with, and even if you land the Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku, not all of the hits will connect, so Gou Shoryuken is the way to go.

- Intermediate

→ Crouching MK xx Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [LK] > Standing LP xx Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK]

Spoiler

Not the most practical combo, but the Standing Jab gives you a little more damage, and a little more style. Not much of an incentive to use this combo with the Standing Jab though. You do see this used in high level play almost exclusively, so unless you’re playing at that level, ditching the Jab is a good choice, and not much is lost either.

→ (While Opponent’s Airborne) Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK] > Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [LK] > Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK]

Spoiler

An extension to the beginner level Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku combo, landing a Light one when you land gives you another full juggle. The Hard Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku gives you that good positioning, but you can use the Gou Shoryuken here as well. Regardless of which ender, the extra juggle leads to some nice damage.

- Advanced

→ Standing HP xx Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [LK] > Standing LP xx Gou Shoryuken [HP]

Spoiler

Similar to the first Intermediate combo, the Jab gives you a little more damage, but requires a lot more execution. This combo isn’t by any means practical, as it’s not only better to end with a Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku, but the precision it takes is simply not worth it at all. The proper window to hit the opponent with the Jab is pretty small, and so is the extra damage you get, so know you can do this combo, but leave it at that.

→ Standing MK xx Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [MK] > Gou Shoryuken [MP]

Spoiler

Real solid combo, but it does about the same damage as a Light Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku into a Hard Gou Shoryuken and not only is much harder to execute, but also doesn’t work on the whole cast, so why use it? Simple. The Medium version of the Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku is safer than its Light counterpart. Although it’s not by much, if you had two combos to choose from, and they did the same amount of damage, but one was safer, you would probably go with the safer one. The only thing that would be stopping you at that point is the execution, so if you have this down pat, use it. If not, don’t sweat it too much and stick to the Light version. This combo does not work on Ibuki, Hugo, and Oro.

→ Crouching MK xx Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [MK] > Gou Shoryuken [HP]

Spoiler

Really solid damage, as it combines the best of both worlds with the Medium Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku starter and the Hard Gou Shoryuken ender. If you’re wondering why this combo hasn’t even been alluded to yet, it has one major flaw that kept it out of the race for best combo, and that’s the amount of characters it can actually be performed on. Unfortunately, this combo can only be done on Chun-Li, Makoto, Q, Alex, Necro, Twelve, and Elena.

→ Crouching MK xx Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [MK] > Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK]

Spoiler

Almost exactly identical to the Medium Gou Shoryuken ender, except for that fact that this one works on Ibuki. The characters this combo can be performed on have been tested by myself, as the information on this combo was no where to be found. In my studies, I concluded that this combo can be performed on everyone except Hugo and Oro. If you have tested otherwise, please let me know so I can update this with the correct information. It should also be noted that this combo seems more difficult to execute than the Medium Gou Shoryuken ender, so it’s best to stick with that instead.

→ (While Opponent’s Airborne) Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK] > Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK] > Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK]

Spoiler

Now onto the slick stuff. The legendary Triple Tatsu Kuroda Style Combo. This combo and its variants below do some really good damage. Unfortunately, it doesn’t have a regular role in Akuma’s game plan. The thing to note about this combo is that the timing on the Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku upon landing is really tight, since it must hit in way that will have only the first and last hits connect. Also, the Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku can only hit once, and the height at which you hit your opponent is also crucial. Reacting to these conditions accordingly in such a small amount of time is almost insane, and properly spacing and timing an Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku to achieve this combo requires an immense amount of skill to do in a match. Basically, you won’t be pulling this off left and right every time you land an Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku. In fact, you probably won’t ever be pulling this off in a fight. The only person that uses this consistently is Kuroda, arguably the greatest Third Strike player of all time, so ultimately this combo shouldn’t be top priority to land in a match, as you’ll most likely just end up missing out on guaranteed damage. Regardless, it should be noted that the opponent does not have to be airborne for this combo to work, as they can be standing and get hit once (not twice) with the initial Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku and the combo can still be done, although the timing becomes even more difficult for the ground Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku follow up. Still, this combo is probably the coolest in the entire game, and pulling this off in training mode feels incredible. If you are still confused on how it’s performed, there is a fantastic video tutorial covering it that you should look for in the Videos section. All in all, try this one out for yourself and decide whether you’ll be Kuroda-styling on fools in your next matches or sticking to more… human combos.

→ (While Opponent’s Airborne) Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK] > Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK] > Gou Shoryuken [HP]

Spoiler

Another awesome combo. This one in particular is Akuma’s most powerful meterless, and fortunately, it is much easier than the last one. There’s also a video tutorial of this by the same guy who made the last one in the Videos section, so there won’t be much detail on how to perform it here. It will be noted that this combo isn’t very practical as a regular air-to-air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku combo. This is because the amount of hits you get with the initial Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku affects the timing of the next one, and reacting to this is quite difficult. Instead, this combo is perfect for when your opponent is airborne and is in the middle of parrying your SAI. While they are parrying it, you can jump at them and hit with an Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku (unless they’re absolutely incredible at parrying), and then hit them with another Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku, followed by a Hard Gou Shoryuken when you land. Also, all that damage gets added on to the hits your SAI didn’t have parried, so this combo packs a serious punch. This combo can also be used anywhere on screen, so if you ever go for an anti-air/air reset SAI, look out for that parry and unload this on them if it shows up.

→ (While Opponent’s Airborne) Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK] > Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK] > Dash > Gou Shoryuken [HP]

Spoiler

This combo is identical to the Triple Tatsu Combo except it does less damage, and of course doesn’t have three Tatsumaki Zankuukyakus in it. Still, the timing, difficulty and practicality are the same. This combo can still work on a standing opponent as long as the Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku only hits once. Although this combo is rather difficult and impractical, if we were to pretend you were a God of 3S, and could pull of these combos with absolute ease, you should be using the Triple Tatsu Combo instead of this one, as it’s more damaging. Although this combo can have the Gou Shoryuken super cancelled to add more damage.

→ (While Opponent’s Airborne) Standing LP xx Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK] > Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK]

Spoiler

If you’re tired of being told these amazing combos are too impractical, you’re in luck, because this one isn’t. A shorter version of the others, this combo uses a Standing Jab as an anti-air, or as a cross-under punish, and cancels it into a Hard Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku, which allows for an Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku follow up. The ground Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku still has to juggle like the Triple Tatsu Combo, but fortunately, the anti-air Standing Jab almost always (if not always) allows it to juggle properly, eliminating any strict timing. With that, you can still get a Double Tatsu Combo off in match, which is still extremely stylish, but most importantly, gives you a very damaging anti-air.

→ (While Opponent’s Airborne) Standing LP xx Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK] > Dash > Gou Shoryuken [HP]

Spoiler

Same as the above combo, except less damage, so it falls to second best. Still, it’s possible and has its own flare of style that you can add into your game.

• 1 Meter

*This section will not be separated by difficulty of each combo, because these are mostly the combos from the Meterless section, so their difficulty can be viewed there. If the combo starter is a Medium or Hard normal, it can usually be replaced with Standing Forward, Crouching Forward, Standing Fierce, and Crouching Strong. *

- Super Art I: Messatsu Gou Hadou

→ Crouching LK xx Crouching LK xx SAI

Spoiler

Basic hit confirm that works on everyone.

→ Crouching LK > Crouching LP > Crouching LK xx SAI

Spoiler

Basic hit confirm that gives you a little more time to get confirmation on a hit, but doesn’t work on everyone. This does not combo on Q, Necro, and Urien.

→ Crouching LK xx Crouching LK xx Crouching LK xx SAI

Spoiler

Basic hit confirm that also gives you more time to see if the opponent blocked or not, but also doesn’t work on everyone. Characters this doesn’t combo on include Q, Necro, Urien, Twelve, Ryu, Ken, and Sean.

→ Standing MK xx SAI

Spoiler

Another hit confirm, although harder to react to than the others. Remember that the Standing Forward must be parried high, so it will hit opponent’s look to parry the hit confirms above.

→ Crouching MK xx Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [LK] > Standing [LP] (Air Reset) > SAI

Spoiler

An air reset combo that does less damage than the combo below, but can be used to bait a parry. If your opponent parries a few hits of this super, but messes up, then Akuma can use a very damaging combo on the mid-air opponent (4th to last combo in the Advanced section).

→ Standing HP xx Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [LK] > Gou Shoryuken [LP] xx SAI

Spoiler

Standard combo into SAI. Remember to use a Light or Medium Gou Shoryuken as they do more damage on their first hit than the Hard version.

→ Crouching MK xx Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [MK] xx Gou Shoyruken [MP] xx SAI

Spoiler

Another standard combo for this super. Does solid damage, but is harder to execute than the combo above.

→ (While Opponent’s Airborne) Jumping HP (Air Reset) > SAI

Spoiler

Another air reset combo. Any jumping normal can be used to perform this, but a Light attack does such little hit stun so they’re almost impractical. Medium attacks are a good to use, but Hard attacks do more damage, so use those.

→ (While Opponent’s Airborne) Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK] > Gou Shoryuken [LP] xx SAI

Spoiler

Simple air combo that does solid damage. The Gou Shoryuken must be done as late as possible so that the opponent doesn’t get juggled too high. If this happens, the super will whiff entirely.

→ (While Opponent’s Airborne) Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK] > Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [LK] > Gou Shoryuken [LP] xx SAI

Spoiler

An extension of the combo above, although a little tougher to execute.

→ (While Opponent’s Airborne) Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK] > Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK] > Dash > Gou Shoryuken [HP] xx SAI

Spoiler

Nice damage, but the difficulty and impracticality of this combo keep it from being useful. Still, it’s possible, just remember to cancel the Hard Gou Shoryuken on its first hit.

→ (While Opponent’s Airborne) Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK] > Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [ :kick-hard: ] > Gou Shoryuken [LP] xx SAI

Spoiler

A really damaging combo, but for reasons explained in the last combo, this combo will be used little to never. Regardless, the Light Gou Shoryuken must hit as late as possible, to keep the super from whiffing.


#8

Super Art II: Messatsu Gou Shoryu

→ Crouching LK xx Crouching LK xx SAII

Spoiler

Basic hit confirm that works on everyone. This super doesn’t have a crouching hit confirm that does three hits because of its range.

→ Standing MK xx SAII

Spoiler

Another hit confirm, although this one is harder to pull off with SAII than SAI since the push back will take you out of range if you don’t react fast enough.

→ Standing HP xx Gou Shoryuken [MP] xx SAII

Spoiler

A damaging combo, but doesn’t have much of a way to hit confirm, unless you can react to a dive kick placed before this combo, which is difficult to do. A great punish though.

→ Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [MK] > Gou Shoryuken [MP] xx SAII

Spoiler

Does good damage, but has too many flaws to be used. One is that a normal cannot be placed in front of this combo because the pushback will cause the super to whiff. Also, even when you don’t add a normal to the beginning, the super still whiffs at times. With no real way to hit confirm either, this combo should be avoided.

→ Crouching MK xx Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [LK] > Gou Shoryuken [MP] xx SAII

Spoiler

The standard combo for this super. Does solid damage, but unlike SAI, the Medium Gou Shoryuken should be used exclusively, because the Light version launches the opponent too high, resulting in a lot of lost damage.

→ Standing MK xx Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [LK] > Standing MK xx SAII

[details=Spoiler]I discovered that this combo is possible by complete accident. When trying to cancel from a Medium Gou Shoryuken into super, I got a Crouching Forward instead, and the super still connected. I’ve determined that a Standing Forward is best to use with this combo because the first Quarter-Circle Forward should be inputted before the normal you’ll cancel into super. It should look like…

QCF (Quarter Circle Forward) → Normal of Choice → QCF Punch

This means that if you use a punch as your normal of choice, you’ll get a Gou Hadouken, and Standing Forward is the most damaging kick you can use in this situation, so it’s the way to go. It should be noted that this combo can be perfomed with a punch as well, but it’s a little more difficult to execute. It should look like…

QCF → Back → Punch → QCF Punch

You must press back after the first QCF to interrupt a Gou Hadouken, and the game will still recognize this as a super. Standing Fierce is the best punch to use, but using a punch is more difficult than using a Standing Forward. This combo does more damage than the one above.[/details]
→ (While Opponent’s Airborne) Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK] >Gou Shoryuken [MP] xx SAII

Spoiler

A basic air combo that does solid damage. Input the super as late as possible to get the most hits out of it.

→ (While Opponent’s Airborne) Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK] > Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [LK] > Gou Shoryuken [MP] xx SAII

Spoiler

An extension of the combo above, this one adds some nice damage, but requires some practice to nail down.

→ (While Opponent’s Airborne) Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK] > Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [LK] > Standing MK xx SAII

Spoiler

Another combo with normal cancelled into super. Rememeber that you can also use Standing Fierce, but the inputs are different and a little more difficult.

→ (While Opponent’s Airborne) Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK] > Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK] > Gou Shoryuken [MP] xx SAII

Spoiler

A really damaging combo that does almost half life against most characters. Unfortunately, this combo is difficult to pull off in match due to its specific conditions. Remember to hit the Gou Shoryuken as late as possible to get the most hits out of the super. Tied for the most damage out of the three double Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku combos. The other two can be found below.

→ (While Opponent’s Airborne) Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK] > Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [ :kick-hard: ] > Standing :kick-medium: xx SAII

Spoiler

A different variation of the combo above, this one does the least damage out of the three and is probably the least helpful. Still, it can be done and does really solid damage regardless. Just like the Gou Shoryuken, whatever normal you use to cancel into super has to hit as late as possible, or your opponent will air reset, causing the super to whiff.

→ (While Opponent’s Airborne) Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK] > Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK] > Gou Hadouken [HP] xx SAII

Spoiler

I discovered you can do this combo by accident as well. When trying to do a Gou Shoryuken, a Gou Hadouken came out instead, and the super still hit. It does the same damage as the Gou Shoryuken ender, which is really good, but it also has an advantage over the other double Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku combos. If you accidentally neutral jump for the second Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku, you can use this combo and still get the super, while the others will whiff. The timing is a little tricky, but since it works if you diagonal jump as well, this probably the best of three.

Super Art III: Messatsu Gou Rasen

→ Crouching LK xx Crouching LK xx SAIII

Spoiler

Basic hit confirm that works on everyone. Like SAII, this super doesn’t have a crouching hit confirm that hits three times because of its poor range.

→ Crouching MK xx SAIII

Spoiler

A solid combo as the Crouching Forward has good range, although it can’t be replaced with any other Medium or Hard attack, due to their push back.

→ Crouching MK xx Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [LK] > SAIII

Spoiler

The standard combo for this super. Does good damage, but a Gou Shoryuken can’t be done after the Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku because it knocks the opponent too far away for the super to connect.

→ Standing HP xx Gou Shoryuken [MP] xx SAIII

Spoiler

SImilar to the combo with SAII, this is tough to hit confirm, but does really solid damage and gets all of the super’s hits.

→ (While Opponent’s Airborne) Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK] xx SAIII

Spoiler

You can get more damage out of an Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku, but you should know that this combo is possible. It’s also simple to execute and does good damage.

→ (While Opponent’s Airborne) Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK] > Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [LK] > SAIII

Spoiler

A more damaging version of the above combo. If you get the timing down, this should be used instead of the above for obvious reasons.

→ (While Opponent’s Airborne) Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK > Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK] > SAIII

Spoiler

This combo packs a mean punch and styles while it’s at it. Although you’ve heard by now that this combo is difficult to pull of in a match, it should be noted that you should wait until you land from the second Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku instead of cancelling it into SAIII. This allows the Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku to get all of its hits, and then add the super on the end.

→ (While Opponent’s Airborne) Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK] > Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK] > Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [HK] xx SAIII

Spoiler

The epitome of styling and extremely difficult combos. The Triple Tatsu Combo, as you’ve already read, is really hard to pull off in a match, and even on your own, but the last Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku can be cancelled into SAIII to lower your opponents self esteem and take away a good amount of their life while you’re at it. Unlike the last combo, the last Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku must be cancelled because the combo cannot continue after you land.

• 2 Meters

→ Standing HK xx Shun Goku Satsu

Spoiler

This has little to nothing to do with Akuma’s game at all, but it’s interesting to know that his Standing Roundhouse puts your opponent in that hit stun you can be grabbed out of, which sets up the Raging Demon. You can even add a Neutral Jumping Roundhouse to the beginning of this combo on taller characters. Just make sure you’re at a distance and input the Roundhouse just before you land.

→ Crouching MK xx Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku [LK] > Standing LP > KKZ

Spoiler

The KKZ combo. Although the KKZ loses damage after the air reset, it still does a ton, and only requires a Crouching Forward (or any other normal) into a Light Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku to land, unlike the Raging Demon, which requires a set up. Not the most practical combo, but if you’re looking to end the game with a bang, you can pull this one out. You can input the three down commands after you press the Standing Jab, or you can do one down, and then press Standing Jab, and then do two more and press the three punches. Just remember that the first down and the Standing Jab have to be close to each other or else the game won’t pick it up as part of the other two down commands. You also shouldn’t see Akuma physically duck, as the first down would be hidden in the recovery of the Light Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku, and the other two downs will be hidden by the Standing Jab, just to give you an idea on how it looks. The second method (Down → Standing Jab → Down → Down → 3 Punches) is recommended because it’ll get the KKZ out quicker and reduce the chances of your opponent landing and blocking.

→ (While Opponent’s Airborne) Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku > Standing LP > KKZ

Spoiler

The KKZ can also be done from an Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku juggle. The same concept applies, a Standing Jab resets the opponent and the unparryable KKZ hits while they’re still airborne.


#9

NormalsSpecialsSupersCombosStrategy

• General Strategy

Alright guys, it’s time to leave the technical things and get into the core of Akuma and discuss your game plan when maneuvering this demon. As mentioned before, Akuma has the lowest health in the entire game. This means that taking a few heavy blows from your opponent can leave you at a huge life deficit in the blink of an eye. As much as I’d like to tell you that this situation is easily surmountable, it isn’t. When you get down on health with Akuma, climbing back is tough, because your opponent will soon recognize that you need to come to them. Penetrating your opponent’s defense becomes much harder at that point, especially against good turtling characters. Also, when you get close, some things are now extremely risky, like taking a throw or going for a parry, because you don’t have much life to work with. That I feel is the key with Akuma; life to work with. Although I’m by no means a good Akuma player, I’ve learned a lot over the past almost year of playing him exclusively, and one thing I’ve realized is that the amount of life you have should dictate your play. This probably relates to every character, but with Akuma, I feel this is especially important. Now I’m not saying switch your game plan completely whenever you start losing, but your mentality should shift a little in the way you approach your opponent. When my health bar is green, I tend to take a ton of educated guesses on what my opponent is going to do and which reaction I’ll get out of certain situations and set-ups. This moment in the match is the most comfortable, as your opponent has no idea what you’ll be unloading on them, but as the match progresses, they start to get a feel for your game plan, and sort of wake up to your demon flips, air fireballs, pokes and other things. With that, we get into the two things you’ll hear from Akuma players when asked about his general play style, and that’s…

1.) Play with near perfection and…

2.) Kill quickly or die quickly

With these two tips in mind, you might think that Akuma is too advanced for someone just starting out to play, but you have to look at it this way. No matter who you pick to start, you won’t be winning a ton of matches, especially in a game that’s been out for over a decade, so why not take those losses with Akuma? I absolutely guarantee you it’ll be worth it in the long run, but the journey will be tough.

Now to get back on the first tip. When I have full health, I feel really relaxed and know that I can get away with taking some risks, which is fine and dandy, but when push comes to shove, and you’re down on life, it’s time to take things into consideration. The wider the gap becomes between you and your opponent’s health, the more you have to slow down your game and observe your opponent closely. This is where you have to found out how your opponent is going to react to this situation. If they’re playing back and waiting for you to come to them, slowly approach them and walk them to the corner. Try to stay on the ground during this process because they’re most likely looking for a jump-in to close the gap. If they start becoming more aggressive and want to kill you off, you’ve got to play solid defense until they make a mistake. You’re looking for one hard knockdown, just one, to get your mix-up game going, but getting it will be tough, and it should by no means be forced. Take your time and look for the gap in your opponent’s game. If they’re playing differently now that they see they have the life lead, then they aren’t the same opponent that got you down to that low life in the first place, which means you can get them out of their comfort zone with just one or two good reads and a few nice mix-ups. Just keep your head and win the match. It’s way easier to say than done, but your Akuma should essentially become more… tame the more the life gap increases.

Now on to the second tip. This is a code that you should live by with Akuma. When you’re playing the demon, long matches are definitely not in your favor. The longer the match drags on, the more those little hits you take add up, and you’ll die before your opponent does, because bottom line, your opponent has more life than you. If at all possible, try to get the jump on your opponent early. I know this is also easier said than done, but try to feel your opponent out for a little, and then base your next attack of off the little information you’ve gathered. They’re only going to download you as much as you’ve downloaded them, so you have to break out of the comfort zone and attack first, since most people might want to get a little more comfortable with your play style before they start going in. With Akuma, you’re going to have to take some risks, especially when you’re just starting out. To be honest, a lot of wins I got early on were from being as completely random as I possibly could and going for things that had a lot more risk than reward. Although as you progress, you’ll start to minimize the risks and see a lot more reward. So remember, play near perfectly. Too many mistakes will get you killed a lot faster than any other character, but don’t be too hesitant, as you have to remember to kill quickly or die quickly as well. So ultimately, Akuma is all about finding that balance between recklessness and caution. It’ll all come with time though. Just be patient, take your licks, and keep learning.

• Pressure

Let me start off by saying Akuma’s pressure game is insane. It might not be the best in the game, but it’s close to it. Akuma revolves around pressuring his opponent with his zoning tools and keeping them in place wherever he likes. With good normals, an air fireball, and demon flips, he can keep an opponent guessing constantly, and have them holding down-back long enough for them to make a mistake. That’s what your pressure should revolve around with Akuma, minimizing your opponents chances of doing damage while increasing yours. No other place is better suited for this than the corner. With your opponent’s back to the wall, they’re stuck in place and have to guess correctly on the many mix-ups Akuma has to offer. Getting your opponent in the corner should be a major focus throughout the match, even if that means taking a little damage and risks to do so. Since Akuma’s air fireball and normals have already been lightly discussed, I’ll get started with explaining his Demon Flip and the various mix-ups that can stem from it.

Demon Flip

As previously mentioned, Akuma’s Demon Flip has three different strengths that take him three different distances. Each one plays its own role in his game plan and can be set up in numerous ways, but before we get into that, let’s discuss the options you have while performing a Demon Flip.

• The first is a dive kick. The safest of all Akuma’s options, this is the follow up you’ll be using the most. It’s good for damage as it can lead into hefty combos when performed late, but can also stuff anti-airs when performed early. Another neat trick this follow up has is that if it is performed close to the ground, Akuma will just land with almost no recovery. This sets up a throw, a Crouching Light kick hit confirm, or even a kara Raging Demon. You can also perform a dive kick that hits high/mid and then buffer a back dash just before you land to try to bait out a throw tech, and then punish with a Crouching Forward into whatever you like. The Demon Flip dive kick is the ideal attack to continue pressuring your opponent and keeps them guessing as to what comes next. This move can also be used to cross up. Although the spacing and timing is pretty specific, a cross up is dangerous and adds to your array of mix ups. Just remember to vary the timing of your dive kicks, or they will be parried easily. Going for a late dive kick to get a combo is usually what your opponent is looking to parry, so try an early one to throw them off, or go for an empty one as stated above. This move is easily the best follow up of the bunch, but it still has to be used properly to maximize its advantages.

• The next move to be mentioned is the palm strike. This follow up is the only one that hits high, and causes a hard knockdown as well. Unfortunately, this attack has little uses and will probably be your least used follow up. To be honest, I’ve never used this in a match. This is ultimately because there are better ways to deal with a crouch blocking opponent, like an empty Demon Flip into a throw, a Demon Flip throw, and a few others. It also has some bad recovery time if you whiff and isn’t very effective at stuffing anti-airs. All in all, this is a good option to have, but it’s overshadowed by Akuma’s more versatile follow ups.

• Next on the list is Akuma’s slide. This move is solid, but if it’s abused, you’ll find yourself losing matches rather quickly. If this follow up is blocked, it’s easily punished, so pick your spots wisely with this one. It’s strong in that will hit opponents who are looking to parry a dive kick or palm strike, and it works well after air resets. Unfortunately, it’s easily anti-aired as the move won’t come out until Akuma lands, so even a Standing Jab will hit him out of it. Also, after a full screen Shakunetsu Hadouken, uses the Hard version of the Demon Flip in the slide is a good way to throw off your opponents timing, but this is easily parried by more skilled players, and there are many better setups you can perform after a knockdown instead of this one. Still, when used sparingly, this attack is a good tool to have in your arsenal and can psyche out your opponent if it hits.

• Last is the Demon Flip throw. This move is the second best follow up in my opinion, and is difficult to stop when your opponent becomes hesitant. This throw is great to use when your opponent is anticipating another attack and starts to block, resulting in a guard break, which will most likely make them try to beat out your Demon Flip the next time, repeating the process. It also sends the opponent a good distance across the screen, providing some nice position. Unfortunately, this follow up’s recovery time is substantial, and if your opponent walks away when you Demon Flip, you’ll be wide open to a punish. With that being said, don’t become too obvious with your throws and only use them when you’re confident in your opponent’s fear to move. All in all, A fantastic compliment to the other Demon Flip follow ups, kind of like the icing on the cake when your opponent thinks they’re finally going to block/parry accordingly.

Well, now that you have a good understanding of what each follow up is capable, let’s get into the different strengths to use in different scenarios, what follow ups they can set up, and how to set them up in the first place.

• First strength to be discussed is the Light version. This version moves you the shortest distance, and is great to keep the opponent under pressure. There a few ways to set this up, but the most useful one would have to be canceling it from normals. This actually goes for all strengths of the Demon Flip, as the normal leaves them in block stun while you go airborne, and it gives your opponent less time to react to it since a few frames ago they were dealing with blocking your attack, and now you’re already in the air ready to strike. An air fireball can also be used to the same effect when you neutral jump from the right distance, usually one your opponents wake-up. Canceling into a Light Demon Flip gives the ability to keep pressure constant with dive kicks. You can then go for a hit confirm, and if it fails, dash or cancel into another Light Demon Flip. You can also slide after one if you’re feeling confident, but remember to use this sparingly. A mix up I like to use from time to time is going for a dive kick that hits high on the opponent’s body, and then buffering another Light Demon Flip so that I flip again and soon as I land. This is an attempt to bait out a throw tech, and if they try to, they won’t recover fast enough to avoid your Demon Flip throw. Keep in mind that if your opponent doesn’t throw tech, the slightest movement will put them out of your throw range. Canceling from a Crouching Short, Standing or Crouching Jab, or a Close Standing Strong will also put you in range for a Demon Flip throw. You can also use this version after a you force an air reset. Using a Standing or Crouching Jab will put the opponent right in front of you, but unless you do an early dive kick, your opponent lands well you do. Using a Standing Fierce is probably your best bet, as it leaves your opponent in the air longer, giving them less time to defend against your follow up. A Standing Forward can be used, but to get a dive kick to connect, you have to input it as soon as possible, and you will hit the toe of your opponent. I believe this set up puts you at the dive kick’s max range. This might surprise your opponent as they may think the dive kick will whiff. These set ups help you further apply pressure and can surprise your opponent if they are expecting a combo ender and instead get reset. You can also use a slide after these set ups, which will do some decent damage and score you a knockdown, but is risky to use. Another way to use a Light Demon Flip is when you’re playing footsies with an opponent. If you predict your opponent is going to throw out a normal, you can Demon Flip and force them to make a quick decision after their move recovers. Most skilled players will go for a parry after they recover, so an empty Demon Flip would be ideal here, along with a slide. Players with less experience usually will try to block, which sets up a dive kick for more pressure. Although this tactic is a small part of the Light Demon Flip’s role, it’s still good to have in the back pocket of your footsie game. As you can see, the Light Demon Flip has many uses and purposes, and all of them can be incorporated into your game to constantly provide pressure on your opponent.

• Next up is the Medium Demon Flip. This variant is also a great pressure tool, but it works best to set up Demon Flip throws. Same as before, canceling this move out of a normal is the way to go. For dive kick pressure, this move isn’t great to cancel into if your opponent is on the ground because you will end up flipping right over them, leaving you unable to connect with a dive kick. The good news is that it’s great for air resets. If you use a Medium or Hard normal to air reset your opponent, the Medium Demon Flip will travel with the opponent at almost the same speed and distance. In my opinion, a Standing Fierce is best to cancel out of because you almost travel exactly with your air resetting opponent, making it difficult to see whether you will dive kick, use a slide, or go empty. It should be noted that each normal makes the opponent air reset differently, and that Light attacks are not useful to air reset with because the Medium Demon Flip will go right over their head. It should be noted that you will never be in range for a Demon Flip throw when you’re opponent air resets, but canceling a normal into a Medium Demon Flip on a grounded opponent is very effective for landing one. Normals you can use for this include Close Standing Forward, Crouching Forward, Crouching Strong, Crouching Fierce, and Standing Fierce. As you can see, you have a lot of options when you’re trying to set up a grab. Again, Standing Fierce seems to be the best for this set up because the push back from it lines you up perfectly to throw the opponent. A Medium Demon Flip can also be used after you use a Standing or Crouching Jab to air reset your opponent. Now I know you maybe be confused because I said canceling out of a normal will never leave you in range for a throw, but the trick to this is you’re not actually canceling either Jab. Instead, you perform a Medium Demon Flip right after either attack finishes, leaving you in perfect range to grab your opponent. Overall, the Medium Demon Flip can bring some good pressure, but I feel it’s strongest asset is its ability to set up throws.

• Last up is the Hard Demon Flip. This version is takes a little bit of both previously mentioned variants, as it’s good for dive kick pressure and setting up throws. The Hard Demon Flip’s strengths come from air resetting opponents, as the trajectory allows you to travel with the opponent through the air, similar to the Medium version. The plus about using this version is that it travels the farthest across the screen, so using this to air reset is great for positioning. The best normal I feel to use with this version is a Standing Forward, as it travels almost exactly with the flip, and sends the opponent the farthest away. Setting up throws with this version is a little trickier and doesn’t have nearly as many options as the Medium Demon Flip, but they are still good to know. These include a max range Far Standing Forward, which is good to really catch your opponent off guard, and a Crouching Light > Crouching Jab > Crouching Light hit confirm. this set up is good to use because skilled players will be looking for you to dash in and throw them after they block this ht confirm, so mixing it up with a Demon Flip throw is a good way to keep them on edge. It should be noted that any normal canceled into a Hard Demon Flip will put you in range for a throw if you’re in the corner. This next use is pure theory, as I’ve never used this in match before, but if your opponent is immediately doing a Shoryuken (or any other DP) when you Demon Flip, and you’re having a tough time beating it out, canceling into a Hard Demon Flip from a Jab after an air reset will send you over the opponent’s head, causing a reversal to whiff. Unfortunately, if the opponent does not reversal, their anti-air could auto-correct and still land, so experiment with this tactic as I don’t know the ins and outs of it quite yet. All in all, the Hard version may not be used as much as the other two, but it still has great uses and should be mixed in with the others when possible.


#10

Well, that will wrap up the Demon Flip section, hopefully you’re now familiar with the proper uses for each. Experiment with each set up and decide which ones compliment your play style the best. Before we move on to the next pressure tactic, let’s quickly review the different set ups to use in different situations.

• If your opponent is blocking high, you can use a slide, a Demon Flip throw, or an empty flip into either a throw, Crouching Short hit confirm, or a kara Demon.
•If your opponent is blocking low, you can use a palm strike, a Demon Flip throw, or an empty flip into throw or kara Demon.
•If your opponent is attempting to parry your follow up, you can Demon Flip throw, empty flip into a throw or kara Demon, or vary the timing of your dive kick, from as early as possible to just before you hit the ground.
• If your opponent is using anti-airs, you can do an early dive kick to beat them out. You can also use that Hard Demon Flip set up I mentioned earlier, but remember that I haven’t tested this tactic in a real match.
• Lastly, if your opponent is trying to dash or jump away from your Demon Flip, you can do an early dive kick to catch them.

Tick Throws

Tick throws are a useful tactic with any character, and I’ll admit, this was the highlight of my game when I first started playing Third Strike. Even today I use them a little too much. It’s hard to argue with this tactic because they are successful a good percentage of the time. The thing is though, there are other set ups that could lead to more damage or better positioning in the situations I’ll describe below. This doesn’t mean you should rarely use tick throws, it just means that it shouldn’t be the staple of your offense. Keep this in mind as you read the information below.

I use tick throws the most when I’m pressuring my opponent but can’t seem to break their guard. Although empty Demon Flips can alleviate this problem, I feel that using a dive kick gives them less time to react, but a dive kick into a throw will most likely be teched, as that’s what people usually go for after a dive kick connects. This is where tick throws come in. After the dive kick, you can use any Light attack, and then perform a kara throw to snatch them up as soon as they leave block stun. The Light attack will usually throw your opponent off and make them think that anything but a throw is coming next. Another normal you can use is a Close Standing Forward, although not after a dive kick, as you will be out of range for a kara throw. Instead, this move is good as a meaty attack, which is an attack used right when your opponent wakes up. A kara throw after this will be in range to grab, so mix this set up in as well. Also, if you can’t kara throw, you can just walk up and throw your opponent for any of these tick throws. This is less effective than kara throwing, but can still be useful. Just remember that your opponent has slightly more time to hit you out of this or jump away.

Now, the reason why I say that there are better options behind tick throws is because unless you can hit confirm with one Light attack, you’re already committing to a throw without even knowing if you’re attack will hit or not. If your Crouching Short actually does connect, you would be missing out on a hit confirm into super, which is a lot more damage than a throw. So use tick throws when you are really having trouble getting a hit on your opponent, maybe after the second or third Demon Flip in a series. So now you may be wondering what you should do if your opponent keeps blocking, but you don’t want to miss out on big damage. Well, there’s a way to have your cake and eat it too.

The set up I’m describing doesn’t really have a name, but as discussed many times throughout the guide, a blocked hit confirm is a good time to dash in on your opponent and throw them. However, it should be noted that your opponent can hit you out of this set up, or jump away from it, but it’s risky as you might not be dashing in as well, so many opponents will continue blocking after. The most useful of Akuma’s hit confirms for this set up would have to be the ones starting with a Crouching Short. This is because they are the easiest to hit confirm with. Sometimes in high level play, you will see an Akuma only use a Crouching Short and Crouching Jab when their hit confirm gets blocked. I’m not positive, but I believe this is because they have good enough reactions to see that the two attacks did not hit without having to go into the last attack, the Crouching Short. This is probably done because the Crouching Short only leaves you at +1, while the Crouching Jab leaves you at +4, giving you more time for a follow up. Still, the full hit confirm is still effective and can be used without too much fear of being hit out of it, unless your opponent is confident it’s coming, but that just means you’re becoming predictable with this set up. Another hit confirm that is great for this is a Crouching Strong. Although this is an unconventional hit confirm, it also leaves you at +4, giving you a good amount of time to set up the dash and throw. It should be noted that many skilled players are looking for these exact set ups after they block a hit confirm, and will usually go for a tech. Keep that in mind when one of yours gets blocked. It should also be mentioned that a Far Standing Strong is sets up a dash nicely, as it leaves you at +4 as well, but this isn’t a hit confirm so it isn’t as useful as the others.

That wraps up the Tick Throw section, and we’ll now wrap up the Pressure section all together with a few more tactics and strategies.

Other

This section will be for other pressure tactics that I didn’t feel deserved their own section, but should still be discussed and considered.

Frame Traps

Although Akuma doesn’t have many frame traps, the ones he does have are quite useful. First to be discussed is are basic frame traps that come from blocked hit confirms. After you have one blocked, instead of dashing, using either a Far Standing Forward or a Crouching Forward to beat out any attack you’re opponent tries to retaliate with. This will absolutely frustrate players who rely on sweeps as soon as they get out of block stun, as the start up will repeatedly be beat out. I’ve actually used this tactic soley in some rounds in an attempt to break someone out of the habit of sweeping too often. The reason why this frame trap will beat out your opponents attack is because a blocked hit confirm will leave you at +1 at the least, so with both of these moves starting up in 5 frames, your opponent can only use a four frame move to attack with, and since most four frame attacks are Lights, they won’t be able to reach you due to the push back of the hit confirm. Although some DP’s are four frames or faster, it’s risky to attempt one because if you don’t throw out a normal, it will completely whiff, leaving you to punish. The most useful of the two Medium kicks is definitely the Crouching Forward, for the sole reason that t can cancel into specials and supers. This includes either an SAI or Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku if you’ve noticed your opponent is repeatedly falling for this trap, or a Demon Flip if your opponents tends to block. Either options is great for you, but I would lean towards the Demon Flip as neither an SAI or Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku are safe on block. Another frame trap that Akuma has is a Close Standing Strong into a Crouching Strong. This frame trap is much better than the last because the Close Standing Strong put you at +4, while the Crouching Strong starts up in five frames. This means that unless you opponent was blocking, there is nothing else they can do to avoid the Crouching Strong, unless they use a one frame move, but this must be timed perfectly, and if not, they’ll eat a super if you can hit confirm it. You see this used a lot in high level play, because after the Close Standing Strong, Akuma players will mix it up between the Crouching Strong or a kara throw, so it’s difficult for the other player to make a decision on how to defend. Although this frame trap is better than the first, it’s less accessible in the sense that hit confirming with a Crouching Strong is difficult to do. So use whichever frame trap you feel comfortable with and start stuffing you opponents attacks.

Air Fireballs

Air fireballs are a great way to pressure your opponent. You can force them to try to preemptively beat them out by zoning with them, or you can use this on your opponent’s wake up. When zoning with an air fireball, it’s best to understand that this tactic is not to be relied on, and that it should be used when your opponent feels they can begin advancing on you. When this happens, a jump-back or neutral jump air fireball can stop their progress, and if they were in the air, you also score a knockdown. Don’t become obvious with this tactic though because a parried air fireball could mean trouble, and remember to throw one out as late as possible to maximize safety. Air fireballs can also be used on your opponents wake up, which does a number of things for your pressure game. One, it prevents your opponent from anti-airing. Once you scare them away from this tactic, pressuring with other methods will become much easier. Remember that this can be parried, so going for a fake air fireball is also effective. If you do it low enough to the ground, Akuma will start the animation and make a voice cue, but the fireball won’t come out. This is pretty tricky to deal with and can set up a low attack, a throw, or even a Raging Demon. Also, if an air fireball connects, you can combo after, and if it’s blocked, you can continue pressuring with a Demon Flip cancel, a hit confirm, or a tick throw. Remember to mix these strategies up to keep your opponent confused as to what you will do next.

That just about does it for the Pressure section. Pressuring your opponent is a great way to get positioning and force your opponent into a bad position, so hopefully this section helped you better understand the proper ways to do so. Now without further ado, let’s head on to the mixing your opponent up with the demon.

Mix ups

If you haven’t already noticed, Akuma’s mix up potential is vicious. He makes a living off of confusing his opponents, and has a vast array of tricks kept up his sleeveless gi to do so. He can make opponents block left instead of right, low instead of high, or make them regret blocking all together with a nice set of throws. Achieving these scenarios in a match is key to Akuma’s game plan, and I’ll be discussing every bit of knowledge I’ve picked up on these topics below.

Cross ups

The first mix ups to be discussed will be Akuma’s cross ups. Akuma doesn’t have a ton of cross ups to work with, but the ones he has are very powerful and you can benefit from them greatly.

Jumping Cross ups

This section will include cross ups you can perform on your opponent while you’re airborne, the basic way to cross up your opponent. Unfortunately, Akuma only has one viable way to do so. This is done with his Jumping Medium Kick. This move is difficult to combo with because it does little hit stun, so it must be performed late in order to be effective. A good set up for this cross up is a normal canceled into a Light Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku, followed by a Standing Jab air reset. After the Jab, simply jump forward and you will be in the perfect position to not only cross up your opponent, but be able to combo afterwards. Akuma can also cross up with his Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku, but this does poor damage and cannot be followed up. You can also hit with a cross up using a dive kick, but this also cannot combo into anything else.

Cross Unders

• After performing a Light Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku, a Standing Jab followed by a dash will cross up on the following characters…

Spoiler

Chun-Li, Alex, Urien, Remy, Dudley, Q

After performing a Light Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku, a Crouching Jab followed by a dash will cross up on the following characters…

Spoiler

Akuma, Yun, Urien, Remy, Necro, Q, Dudley, Chun-Li, Sean, Makoto, Alex, Twelve, Ken, Yang

Cross ups on Wake up

This section is likely to blow your mind if this information is new to you. Before writing this guide, I was never aware of the specifics of these set ups, but always wondered how they were performed. These set ups will put you on the other side of the opponent on their wake up usually at the last second, confusing your opponent on which way to hold back. It should be noted that these set ups are character specific, so look out for that in the spoiler of each set up. All of these set ups are for when your opponent quick rolls.

• After canceling any normal into a Medium Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku followed by a Medium Gou Shoryuken, immediately perform a Hard Demon Flip. If this Demon Flip is empty canceled, it will cross up the following characters…

Spoiler

Ryu, Elena, Sean, Ken, Remy, Urien, Makoto, Chun-Li

• After a cross up Air Tatsumaki Zankuukyaku, wait a split second, and then perform a Medium Demon Flip. Then follow up with a dive kick performed as soon as it can be. If this is done correctly, your opponent will quick roll towards you instead of away. After you recover from the dive kick, immediately perform a UOH (Universal Overhead). This UOH will jump over the quick rolling opponent, crossing them up. Although it works on some better than others, this set up can be used on…

Spoiler

Ryu, Elena, Sean, Remy, Q, Necro, Twelve, Oro, Ibuki, Alex, Ken, Hugo, Dudley, Urien, Makoto, Chun-Li

• It should be noted that using the set up above, some characters have properties on their quick roll that allow you to cross them up without performing a UOH. With this set up, your opponent will simply roll through you as you land, so if you hold forward after you land from the dive kick, they will not roll through you for a pretty confusing cross up. This set up works on…

Spoiler

Twelve, Oro, Yun, Yang


#11

Video Section coming soon.


#12

Thanks Section coming soon.


#13

If you’re wondering where this came from, this is a guide a wrote about a year ago on the Eventhubs forums. It wasn’t until recently that I realized not a single soul would see it there, so I decided I would bring it over here. Some of the information in this guide actually came from some posts in these forums, and when I finish the Thanks section I’ll mention it, but I figured it would have a better home here.

Also, sorry all the spoilers show up twice. I don’t know why that happened during the transition and I can’t really find a way to fix it…


#14

good guide im not by any means an Akuma player but seems like you got good info in there. :woot:


#15

Thanks man and it can only grow from here. Hope it helps you level up a bit.


#16

This is ill. I figure I should ask my silly question here instead of opening another thread:

When you do the demon flip, is it better to cancel it and sweep with c.hk instead of letting it finish and landing a knockdown with that? (assuming full range instead of just doing c.mk, lk-tatsu, srk BnB for damage+knockdown). I think people did this in SF4 because the ending wasn’t juggleable and sweep is. But considering its harder to do an all what are the pros and cons of each? I know that the ending of the demon flip seems to be more vulnerable in general. For example people can late AA with normals even, or they can even throw you out of it. They can’t do that vs the cancel/sweep can they?


#17

Unfortunately I’m not that great with Akuma either, so you might have to wait for someone more… qualified to answer your question but help me understand it. Are you asking about letting the demon flip go into the slide versus empty canceling it into a sweep?


#18

exactly. I know one benefit of just letting the slide finish is that if you do it on opponent wakeup its pretty meaty and the recovery is almost nill.


#19

Well, the thing is both are unsafe. In SFIV, Akuma’s go for the sweep for untechable knockdown into vortex. Your opponent can quick roll the sweep so that vortex doesn’t really exist. If I had to choose between the two though, I’d use the slide simply because it’s faster. If someone really knows the Akuma match up, they might even throw as soon as they recognize the empty flip, which could grab you out of the sweep. The slide hits low as soon as you land while the sweep still has start up, although its small, so that’s how I see it. You should also keep in mind that you can get AA’d late out of both of them with a normal since you have to land before you hit them.


#20

empty demon to sweep…thats retarded, never do that.