New to fighting games


#1

Hello everyone! As stated in the title in pretty new to fighting games and i’m just looking for some game recommendations to help me improve. Right now the only fighting game i really have is Skullgirls and while i enjoy playing it i’m god awful. So any game recommendations with a in depth training system or that may just help me improve will be greatly appreciated!


#2

Disclaimer: I don’t consider myself an expert on fighting games. The only game I’m at tournament level with is the original Super Smash Bros. Any advice I give should be taken with a grain of salt.

The advice I see thrown around on the Newbie Dojo a lot is “play with a purpose.” I don’t think there’s a particular game that’ll help you get good at fighting games in general. As you play and gain more experience, you’ll find that a lot of the skills you learn will transfer from game to game, but the best way to get good at a particular game is to play that game.

Now, back to ‘playing with a purpose.’ I’ve found that this idea can be broken into three big steps.

  1. Identify what works and doesn’t work. This means watching matches with an analytical, critical eye. Watch both your own matches and high-level tournament matches. Identify what players do that works and doesn’t work. When they land hits, figure out why. When they get hit, figure out why.
  2. With this knowledge, identify your weaknesses. What are the things that good players do and you don’t? Are you dropping combos or having trouble with a particular cancel? Are you leaning on a single move and getting bodied because of it? Do you need to block better, or space better, or hit-confirm better?
  3. Once you know where you’re weak, you can start playing with purpose. If you’re weak on blocking, turn the CPU up and see how long you can guard its attacks. If you’re dropping a combo, get to Training Mode and work on it. If you can’t reliably hit-confirm, see if you can set your training dummy to Random Guard and practice that way. Most of all, practice, practice, and practice. If you never change your playstyle, you will never get better, but if you can identify what works and what doesn’t, you’ll improve quicker than you expect.

I hope this helps. Best of luck, and if you’re confused regarding any of the above text wall, feel free to ask for clarification!


#3

Since you’re new to the FGC it wouldn’t be a bad idea to just start with super streetfighter 4. Pretty basic game with enough depth to keep the game interesting. It’ll quickly teach you the fundamentals of (footsie based) fighters and the Newbie Dojo here can be a big help.

And I might add that you should let NOTHING become an automatic process, except for combos and anti-airing. People tend to forget that too much monotonous practice can lead into developing an predictable playstyle and bad habits that become hard to transgress. By bad habits I mean things like always jumping in at certain distances, mashing, grabbing (after certain attacks) etc.