newbie needs help...


#1

Hi SRK forums and guys

This is my first post in Shoryuken.com, which I might not know the rules here. So please bear me if I am saying or doing something wrong here, then I will delete the post if necessary
I just picked up a copy of SSFIVAE for almost a week now, it was my first fighting game ever in my life (sort of, at least on console) Usually, I am quite good at doing mechanic on keyboards or controllers, and PvP stuff on other games. However, I found myself very frustrated on playing this game. I tried to find tutorial online, on YouTube, or any other source. and** I know, maybe all of you might think, I have only been playing for one week, I shouldn’t become a good player by now.** But I barely finish the medium arcade mode, took my several times to finish it. When I fight online, I had only beaten people 3 times, of those people who didn’t play properly. I just spent an hour and half on playing “medium hard” arcade mode, which I did not even made it to bean Seth on the last stage.

I’m sure, most of the people would say I need more practice before I come here to ask. Usually I pick up game pretty quick, probably I’m just not talented on play fighting game? I’m seeking opinion of how fast people get used to SSFIV, and how long it might take for a normal man to become a “alright player” like (C or B?) I’m kinda upset now (after got beat up HARD by CPU =_=), I really want to become a good player on this game, but what I am doing right now doesn’t seems to lead me into this path. I’m here for kindly advises, I’m not those kids who what to become a top play in one night. LOL So please be nice to me, I will try to do whatever you guys advise and practice hard. And Thank you a lot, for just reading my post.


#2

First off, the CPU isn’t a good indicator of how good a player you are - play offline against other people, or failing that, play online (preferably endless) against people with good connections. Secondly, don’t expect to become good at this game in a short amount of time. I’d expect you to spend around 5-6 months (maybe slightly less) before you get B rank online. That’s perfectly normal.

Here’s my generic cheat sheet to getting better at SF4 as fast as possible:
[list]
[]Ignore the CPU, play against real people - preferably offline. CPUs play nothing like a human would; you’ll develop bad habits fighting the CPU (trust me, I’ve spent years unlearning CPU-only tactics). Likewise, there are certain tactics you’ll see in online play that will not work offline, so it’s good to stay away from those as well.
[
]Ask the Newbie Saikyo Dojo for any questions you might have. It’s those guy’s job to help out people new to the game and answer any questions they might have.
[]Ask people to critique your matches. Save and record your online replays and upload them to YouTube, or failing that, find an online stream that saves its matches (Panda x Gaming for the 360, Iodised Salt for the PC, etc.). You will improve dramatically if you know what you are doing wrong.
[
]Figure out how you are losing matches, and then focus on that weakness as much as you can. Is your opponent jumping in on you for free? Learn how to anti-air on reaction. Is your opponent getting away with reversals? Block as he gets back up. Is your opponent mashing out some invincible move when he’s in a combo that you’re prone to dropping? Intentionally stop the combo, practice the combo more, or try something simpler.
[]Have a reason for every button you press and every move you execute. Trust me, you will become instantly better when you have a plan and press the buttons that will put that plan in action.
[
]Adapt. Adapt, adapt, adapt. Is your opponent blocking as he gets up after you knock him down? Throw him. If he catches on to this, you might want to start hitting him with a “meaty” attack (more on terminology in a little bit), and if he catches on to that, start blocking.
[*]Don’t be afraid of losing. You generally learn more from a lost match in this game than a won one. especially if you record and repeatedly watch that match. Nobody wants to do that (I sure don’t) - who wants to watch themselves lose? - but it’s worth it in the end. You’ll learn your bad habits, and like I said earlier, improve much faster than you otherwise would as a result.
[/list]

There’s also a few sticky posts over in the Newbie Saikyo Dojo you should read - specifically, [the execution guide](SRK Newbie Saikyo Dojo Execution Guide (read me!) [the fighting game terminology glossary](The SRK Glossary - WIP and the [beginner’s guide thread](Basic Video Tutorial/Guide for Total Beginners for SSF4

Happy fighting!


#3

DangerOnTheRanger, you have my big thanks for giving me tips!!

I kind of realize that CPU react like God, which normal people wouldn’t be doing. And the theory is kind of the same, if you play too much CPU in Counter-Strike. It makes you become an idiot, when match up with real players. And how can I forget about this simply rule LOL?

I am not afraid of losing at any point (maybe, at least for now), because I have never felt I can outplay other people. Sounds really sad, but that’s the truth :[ When I play ranked mode on PS3, it’s hard to find people with good connection. However though, when I am playing on endless mode, people always kick me out, because I’m too suck on this game. If I create my room, people just leave after the fights =_=. I try to fight as much as possible.
If I match up with higher skilled player, all I wanted is to do is try to block all his attack, because* I think* blocking is the hardest and most useful tool I can use in a fighting game (maybe I’m wrong). And if I can find one or two opportunity to reversals or punish him when he makes mistake, I felt enough for the game. Since, there is really no way I can win those people.
I’m a big fan of watch replay, it really helps a lot to improve in any kind of games or sports. But I haven’t done so, because I don’t really know what my mistakes are, probably I need to find out the proper way of playing this game first in the links you gave me.

Again, Thank you a lot for answering my question. I thought no one is going to reply my thread, lol.


#4

If you want to learn to block properly, you’re in good shape. One of the most important skills in this game, and a thing new players habitually refuse to do.

Also, on youtube there are the VesperArcade Street Fighter Tutorials that explain how the game works - SF4 is a complicated system, and learning how the game works can help you a lot.

One small bit to guide your thinking: Street Fighter is a game of controlling space.
Fancy combos are fine, and in some cases important, but knowing good ranges for defense, aggression, where your character is strongest (or least weak in bad matchups) and vice versa is very important.

Street Fighter is also a game of commitment. Oftentimes doing a move means you lock yourself to an action and that action can be countered without you being able to do anything. Like, say, record a character walking back and forth and throwing fireballs, and see at what ranges you can jump in and hit the character with a jumping attack while the character is still in the fireball animation. At some ranges, you can punish him for committing himself to a badly spaced fireball. At others, he recovers early enough and could shoryuken the jump you committed yourself to.


#5

What I do, appart from spending a lot of time in training mode, is playing ranked (not caring at all about the points). I think it’s easier to find fights around your level this way. I usually play arcade mode with fight requests on and that way I get a lot of matches. In between, instead of fighting the CPU, I focus on blocking, countering mistakes and landing combos when the right opportunity arises. I think it’s great to use training mode to practice combos and specific situations, but it also has to come out spontaneously during a real match (and that’s when my execution goes down A LOT). At the low levels we are, I think the CPU is not that of a bad choice for training between matches… as long as you do it the right way.


#6

redacted


#7

Wow, thank you guys for answering my question

I have been watching Vesper’s tutorial for 2 times now. I pretty much understand how the game works in some way. All the special move he taught such as super jump canceling, buffering…etc. I can bring them into training mode easily, just have to input ithem right. I’m not sure if I can bring those into a real match, problem is I cannot find any chance to use them. It’s like learn how to run before you can properly walk. However though, the basic combo like, linking, chaining…etc. are harder to learn practically, especially linking. Even though I practice with CPU or training mode, I will forget to use it in the match. I turned to mashing the keys and try to stop their combo. but I realized that will only make me vulnerable and not blocking anything.
It is good to know how everyone think of this problem, I’m pretty sure there are thousand ways to become better at this game. and I think I need to find a right way for myself as well. Thanks for try to solve my problem, and I will try what you guys recommended.


#8

You don’t stop their combo by mashing buttons randomly. You block and wait until they do something unsafe and punish, or if you think they’re going to drop it, you mash shoryuken (if playing a shoto) to punish it.


#9

I know I’m doing it wrong LOL. That’s why I need to practice not be panicking during match up. I learned to mash uppercut yesterday when I’m in blocked, and try to counter hit/reversal when there’s chance open. AND that worked really well! I just beat a 2000PP player 2 times in a row. I punished him by mashing uppercut when I’m blocked or knock down. Tried to do Cr.HK when she try to crossover me using a special (He played Viper VS my Ken). And jump throw him, since he think I might to a uppercut again LOL.


#10

GUISE WE TEACHING NEWBIES TO MASH ONLINE NOW ? Facepalm


#11

^^’


#12

Taikerker Just play every day and u will be better :slight_smile: