No, duh: parents do kids' schoolwork; kids can't cope with failure


#1

Half-assed study and editorial from <a href=“http://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2013/01/why-parents-need-to-let-their-children-fail/272603/”>The Atlantic:</a><br><br>Overparenting is characterized in the study as parents’ “misguided attempt to improve their child’s current and future personal and academic success.” In an attempt to understand such behaviors, the authors surveyed psychologists, guidance counselors, and teachers. The authors asked these professionals if they had witnessed examples of overparenting, and left space for descriptions of said examples. While the relatively small sample size and questionable method of subjective self-reporting cast a shadow on the study’s statistical significance, the examples cited in the report provide enough ammunition for a year of dinner parties.<br><br>…<br><br> This is what we teachers see most often: what the authors term “high responsiveness and low demandingness” parents." These parents are highly responsive to the perceived needs and issues of their children, and don’t give their children the chance to solve their own problems. These parents “rush to school at the whim of a phone call from their child to deliver items such as forgotten lunches, forgotten assignments, forgotten uniforms” and “demand better grades on the final semester reports or threaten withdrawal from school.”<br>


#2

I would say I saw quite a few of the “gifted and talented” kids from my small town went to the same college as me and without their teacher parents coddling them and telling them how bright they were, they failed miserably.  Letting your kids get ahead because of work you put in will only benefit them short term, and will cause them to fail when they actually have to overcome their own adversities.  <br>


#3

Some kids’ll never learn.<div><br></div><div>That cheesy enough for you, SRK?</div>


#4

I skimmed the article and agree, and I’ve seen it happen a few times myself. <i>However</i>, if you don’t get involved in your kid’s schooling, they’ll end up like all the rest of the high school graduates who don’t know what 40% of 100 is (I recently spoke to a junior at a private high school that didn’t know this, and it’s so common it didn’t really surprise me).<br><br>I know the article was more about life lessons and not just math homework, but things are bad when you can’t even trust your kid’s teacher to correctly grade homework and tests because they don’t know their subject. I still can’t sympathize much with the parents, because they usually don’t care about whether their kid actually learns anything either- just get that GPA and that SAT score higher.<br>


#5

It’s a shame when someone doesn’t know something as simple as percentages…