Online gaming via DSL and Cable


#1

Hey guys, I’ve been gaming online via DSL for a few years now. I absolutely hate it. I get tons of lag spikes and the lag in general sucks. Nothing is more infuriating than roll backs and your character not responding even though you can hear the loud click of a microswitch push button. My DSL is VDSL2 which has an interleave which adds on average 21 ms of ping on top of the usual ping you get. So, instead of having a first hop of 8 ms, I get 29 or so on average. I notice I get a lot of input delay yet my opponent is busting out finely timed reversals and I can’t even get a simple poke to come out right. How can it be so lopsided? And, today, for no reason, my online gaming experience was pretty much a lag fest in sub 100 rooms. No reason for that at all. My provider is Qwest DSL and I’ve read recently that they have been struggling with bandwidth because they’ve been over selling and their network can’t handle all the new customers. I didn’t used to have this problem 2 years ago, and since their services have become almost sinfully cheap.

On top of that, they haven’t updated my modem’s firmware in over a year and it still can’t enforce MAC address approvals even though the option is there. Who knows what else is messed up in that firmware?

I was thinking about switching, but there really aren’t any alternatives. I can go to cable, and the only provider here is Comcast. I haven’t read much positive feedback about them, though. Their service packages are relatively similar in price once you get past the new customer grace period of both cable and DSL for about the same up/down stream. However, the main thing is, there is no interleaving on a cable connection so my first hop should be lower around 8 ms and Comcast has a bigger network infrastructure in the USA than Qwest.

So, how many of you game on DSL and how many on Cable? Have you gamed on both? Which do you prefer if you have?


#2

DSL = Damn Slow Line.
I have Verizon Fios. Its ok not better than Comcast cable but I don’t have much problems gaming online unless someone on the network is doing heavy downloads or streaming.


#3

Depends on your DSL or cable company’s routing.
Ask if you are on fastpath or interleaved if on DSL- fastpath is low latency (good), interleaved is less dropped packets (reliable++), but higher latency.

DSL in Canada - I swear by fastpath.
Cable - really depends on congestion and routing.


#4

It’s not the technology, it’s how your provider uses it.


#5

This man speaks the truth.

Both are shared mediums; they’re simply shared differently. A neighborhood cable node can be heavily oversubscribed just as easily as a DSLAM backhaul link can be, it just happes a bit more upstream. The effect on the customer remains the same.

For gaming, it’s really all about latency (latency + bandwidth = speed or more accurately, throughput). Either connection is capable of providing low latency, it just depends on the location/market/carrier. My company sells ADSL2+ over IP DSLAMs. I get a consistent 24/1 with good latency on this circuit. I’ve had cable that operated just as well. I’ve also had cable that was unusable during prime time, and DSL that sucked.

The only additional catch with DSL is the quality of copper in ground (usually good in most areas) and in premises (possibly shitty if in an old structure), and distance. But there are a lot of easy ways to negate the distance issue with DSL.


#6

DSL and FIOS in my opinion is the best because you get a dedicated line and you get the advertise speeds. The only factor that might affect down/up speeds and ping is the people who use the internet in your house but cable has this problem also on top of the entire neighborhood sharing the same line.


#7

My provider says on VDLS2 there is no fastpath option. So I’m stuck with the poor ping performance. This is why I’m considering dropping it to move on to cable, since cable doesn’t have interleaving. But then I may have to deal with the cable being oversubscribed in my neighborhood. However, all the wireless networks around me are DSL ones, so I’m thinking there aren’t a lot of cable subscribers. My ping also skyrockets anytime during the day until late night where it somewhat levels off.

It’s fine for browsing the net and stuff, but for online gaming it simply sucks.


#8

running on canadian cable

i hate rogers though but they’re the providers that my parents are using
trying to get them to switch to teksavvy

and fucking rogers charges an arm/leg for extra bandwidth on a shitty bandwidth cap of 60 gigs
for the same price including all fees, teksavvy gets me 300 gigs and not fucking 2 dollars for extra bandwidth

its like rogers’ giving the middle finger to netflix for their own on demand service and making everyone take its up the backdoor


#9

Well the cable you get will depend on the provider and the routing. It definitely could be better, and it could be worse. But no way to know unless you try or have a friend in the area with a similar service. Good luck!

You can also go Teksavvy Cable. Still in its infancy and I’ve heard through the grapevine that congestion issues are being sorted out, but don’t quote me on that.
If you live in Canada, you should not be on Bhell or Robbers, ever.


#10

I’m of the opinion that your level of service depends entirely on the infrastructure already in the area. Comcast has been voded worst company in America on Consumerist but in my neighborhood I get way better service than I ever had with Verizon DSL.

Sent from my haxsung intercept using Tapatalk


#11

yeah my fried was switching to teksavvy cable, DSL isn’t available in our region and i wasn’t gonna take a dsl option anyways.

main reason on rogers is due to some members of our family working there


#12

Should milk it and get +++bandwidth and a top tier connection for a fraction of the price then :looney:. It’s doable, especially if you have people in the know.
Teksavvy is just easier for common folk like myself who can’t bear with calling up India every few months and needing to compromise in the meantime.


#13

OP, are your only options Qwest and Comcast? Where are you in the US? Do you have access to Verizon’s FIOS service?


#14

Yes, only options are Qwest and Comcast. Oh, I can get satellite too, but yeah, that isn’t happening. I’m in New Mexico near El Paso, TX. Verizon doesn’t exist out here.


#15

Yeah, satellite is not even close to being sufficient for online gameplay. The ping times are absolutely atrocious.


#16

I once had the same issues when I was using AT&T DSL. I had signed on for the DSL Pro Speed package (6Mbps/2Mbps). I paid roughly $40/month for the service and always used my own equipment (D-Link DIR-655 router and 2320B DSL modem). I never once even came close to reaching my posted speeds. Only a couple of times I ever reached 4Mbps speeds. This went on for years and all the time, I would experience intermittent down periods. It was only when SF4 was released and I frequently received “disconnect” penalties that I finally was able to reach the right person in AT&T’s help center. A good tech was sent out who found that the node I connected through, was just barely inside the maximum allowable range for my area. And that the circuit I was contected on, was faulty. So the issue lay outside of my home. They fixed it and for awhile everything seemed to be fine again. Yet, a month later, many of the same issues again resurfaced. I had had enough. This time they tried telling me that the only way to stabilize my connection was to lower the speed to 3Mbps. Forget it! I wasn’t going back when the rest of the world was blazing along at over 10Mbps. I switched over to Comcast and for nearly the same cost a month, I got myself into a 16Mbps/2Mbps connection. Not only that, but contrary to what you may see posted elsewhere or what their customer service agents explain, I am still able to use my own equipment. Avoids having to fork over an additional charge each month for “equipment rental”. There are many options/models compatible with their service to choose from according to Comcast’s approved modem list. I went with the D-Link DCM-202. As a bonus, I reach 25Mbps/4Mbps speeds consistently through my notebook’s WiFi according to the tools on DSL/BroadBand Reports.com . Hell - I went a step further and even installed powerline adaptars in my home so that all of my devices are on a “wired” connection. No more laggy DSL on wireless eqipment that acheives a “maybe” connection.

Overall - just dump DSL. You’ve seen the commercials, maybe read something here or there that says why Cable and FiOS are so much better than DSL. It’s true. You may pay alittle more… but it’s frigg’n worth it, IMO!


#17

Ok so you switched to Comcast? In tracert what is your first and second hop ping to google.com during prime time? I’m not really concerned with bandwidth speeds, I’m more concerned with ping times.


#18

fucking shaw is pissing me off.

im with telus right now.

shaw intro’s amazing speeds to gvrd. were talking something like 100 mb down 10 mb up.

YOU HAVE TO GET TV TO GET THE SPEEDS THOUGH.

I’ve never watched a day of TV in my life, other than nat geo and discovery.

my dad likes bell too much. We really need more ISP’s in canada :frowning:


#19

this

this is why canadian ISP’s can get away with gouging you out for only 60 gigs of bw per month
still on the warpath to convincing my parents to switch to teksavvy

waiting for my friend who’s switching to see what’s different
if this works, we’re getting off rogers completely and just using a magic jack for phone service


#20

Well I might convince my father to switch to shaw, he complains they dont hvae all the greek channels, but I pay the rent/utilities, so I dont think he has much choice.