PSX Namco Arcade Stick (grey with yellow buttons, need help with finding right button to replace)


#1

Hey, I am new here, I was told to come here for questions about arcade sticks, etc.<br><br>So here it goes, I was at a swap meet this past weekend and I picked up an NES QuickShot fight stick for $5 (to add to my collection) when I noticed this big grey fight stick with playstation and Namco written on it. As I have never seen one before, I asked the guy about it and he said well its kind of rusted on the bottom (very minor surface rust) and on of the buttons have a hole punched in it. Anyway he said I could take them both for $5. I was not going to argue, but come to find out it is supposedly a rare arcade stick for the psx and it is said one of the best after doing some research. It also works flawlessly, every button seems to be working, although the stick feels like it could be ‘off’?<br><br>To get to the bottom of my questions:<br><br>1. Is this really ‘one of the best’ arcade sticks?<br>2. How do I go about replacing the button with a hole in it and with which ‘part’ or ‘piece’ do I need that would fit like the factory one does? i.e: I would like to replace the button because it bothers me being cosmetically damaged.<br>3. What is the best way to remove the surface rust and maybe attempt to bring it back to the shine it may have once had, if at all possible? Or should I just take the namco sticker on the bottom and spray it?<br>4. The Joystick itself is also missing the ‘center ring’ because right now you can see down into the hole the stick comes out of<br><br><br>I thank you for your time and help, I would like to try to replace the parts missing/damaged and get it back to looking new again.<br><br><br>Thank you.


#2

Moving to tech talk.<div><br></div><div>Also, you should read the stickies in tech talk. There is a lot of information floating about on the PS1 namco stick.</div>


#3

Okay thank you, will do. I was not quite sure where to post this as I really would like to get a new button and joystick ring for it.


#4

Best drop in replacement, not exact, is a Yellow OBSF-30 from Sanwa.  If you replace that button, you might want to replace all of them, they won’t look aesthetically identical.  The ring around the barrel of the button is wider on the stock Namco buttons than the OBSF IIRC.<div><br></div><div>As far as the dust cover (What you’re referring to as the joystick ring), there’s no complete replacement for it if you want to keep it as is, most places that sell stock dustcovers sell ones with wider holes for use with a shaft cover, something the Namco doesn’t have stock.  <span style=“font-size: 10pt;”>You can get a plexiglass one from arthong www.tek-innovations.com</span></div><div><br></div><div>Buttons you can get from arcadeshock or FADC.</div><div><br></div><div>As far as replacing everything goes, there’s some kind of tutorial on here about modding the Namco: http://www.kowal.itcom.pl/ArcadeParts_pliki/modNAMCOen.htm</div><div><br></div><div>You don’t have to worry as much about the part about the joystick, just worry about what it says about the buttons.</div><div><br></div><div>And congrats on getting a Namco for so cheap, that guy was oblivious to what he had.  It would’ve been worth at LEAST $30 with the defects.</div>


#5

new srk sucks<br>


#6

new srk sucks<br>


#7

new srk sucks<br>


#8

Drop in replacements for the stock buttons are Seimitsu PS-14G snap
ins.  The stock buttons are damn good clones of the PS-14Gs, down to the
feel, flat plunger and activation.


#9

<blockquote class=“Quote”>
<div class=“QuoteAuthor”><a href="/profile/2246/coN">coN</a> said:</div>
<div class=“QuoteText”>Drop in replacements for the stock buttons are Seimitsu PS-14G snap
ins.  The stock buttons are damn good clones of the PS-14Gs, down to the
feel, flat plunger and activation.</div>
</blockquote>

Aren’t the switch tabs off center so it’s harder to wire it to the stock PCB?<div><br></div><div>I remember Kowal saying the Sanwa was preferred, but can’t remember if PS-14G has different switches than the other Seimitsu switches I’ve used.</div>


#10

Okay thank you guys for the feedback! It is much appreciated! So I have two conflicting stories, do I get the Sanwa’s or  Seimitsu’s? lol. I will just replace them all so they match.


#11

Okay, after reading the modding guide, He kept mentioning the Sanwa’s were the best fit because the “switches were parallel” and would slide right in. So I found the same buttons for $2/ea and I am going to order 6 of them.<br><br>It also says I need to solder them, is this correct? I have a gun and some lead (but unsure of the type of lead atm) it seems to be too difficult to replace the joystick to me as I am a novice but I think I may order one just so I can replace it and have a dust cover on it. Just have to decide which one to go with.


#12

<div style=“font-size: 10pt; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;”><font face=“Arial”>To replace the buttons, you’re definitely going to have to do some soldering, though how you solder it will be up to you.  The reason that kowal, in his guide, mentions that you’d rather use Sanwa buttons than Seimitsu ones is because as he said, the prongs that stick out from the button’s microswitches are right next to each other.  </font></div><div style=“font-size: 10pt; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;”><font face=“Arial”><br></font></div><div style=“font-size: 10pt; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;”><font face=“Arial”>To illustrate this, imagine a square divided into 4 equal sections.  On Sanwa buttons, the prongs are in the top 2 sections, right next to one another.  But in Seimitsu buttons, the prongs are on opposite ends, one on the top left, one on the bottom right.  </font></div><div style=“font-size: 10pt; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;”><font face=“Arial”><br></font></div><div style=“font-size: 10pt; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;”><font face=“Arial”>The reason this is important to kowal’s guide is because his guide assumes that you’ll be soldering the Namco button PCB board back on to the buttons like it is when you first open up and look into the internals of the arcade stick itself.  However, you don’t actually have to go through that step, and if you don’t have certain tools like a Dremel or a file, you may not actually want to bother doing that.  </font></div><div style=“font-size: 10pt; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;”><font face=“Arial”><br></font></div><div><font face=“Arial” style=“font-size: 10pt; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;”>What you could do instead is grab some spare wire, and instead solder the wires from the button PCB to the buttons themselves.  If you do this, the PCB will be left “hanging” so to speak since it’s no longer soldered directly to the buttons.  As such, what I advise you do is put some electrical tape on the bottom panel where the PCB will be touching the metal so that way nothing gets shorted on accident.  </font></div><div><font face=“Arial” style=“font-size: 10pt; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;”><br></font></div><div><font face=“Arial” style=“font-size: 10pt; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal;”>Alternatively, if you’ve got a crimping tool, you can buy some 0.110" quick disconnects (</font><font face=“Arial” size=“2”><span style=“line-height: normal;”>http://www.focusattack.com/110-quick-connector/)</span></font><span style=“font-size: 10pt; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: normal; font-family: Arial;”> and crimp them to the end of the wire so that you don’t have to solder them to the buttons.  If you go the quick disconnect method, you may have to bend the prongs on the buttons because the quick disconnects are too long to let the bottom panel screw back on properly.  Bending the prongs won’t damage the electronics and will let the thing close up.</span></div>


#13

Yep. You will also need a solder sucker to get the existing buttons out. The PS-14G buttons are the most similar to the stock. They are flat-tastic!


#14

Okay well money is not an issue so I will order a set of both, which ever I do not end up using I will keep for spare parts as I would like a custom stick one day with another project I have planned. It is something to think about, but the way you described it is probably the better way to go about doing it for a novice. I ordered several quick disconnects you posted, thanks for that. I will have a look inside of the casing when the buttons come in and get a better look at what to do. I am also going to try to find some Youtube videos and see what I can scratch up there.<br><br>Thank you again for the help, references, and pointers. I shall post back how it all comes along when I get everything in, but I will continue to check this thread often just in case someone has anything else they would like to add.


#15

Good idea! Try them both out and post back if you need help.