Question about clear coat


#1

I’ve finally decided to take my custom stick out of the back burner and finish it up. I’m on the final stages of painting it and had a question about clear coat.

A guy at Home Depot saw me picking up gloss in the aisle. He said that he had issues with this certain gloss as if you plan on putting multiple coats of it, that you would need to do it in 30 minute increments versus 24 hours like paint. If not it will bubble up between coats. The brand of gloss is Rust-Oleum Painter’s Touch crystal clear gloss.

Do I A( Believe this guy and wait 30 minutes in between coats, or B( Forget this douche bag and wait 24 hours between coats? I really trust you guys as some of you have done amazing works with cases.


#2

If you aren’t 100% certain, try it on a scrap piece of wood first before trying out on your stick.

If I use an acrylic based spray paint, it dries quickly so I just usually wait till it’s touch dry, then put another light coat on. Using very light coats is the best thing. Plus where I live, the humidity is pretty high most of the year, so I tend to use a heat gun (or hair dryer, just don’t tell the missus :lovin:) and that prevents the paint getting that rosiness to it and makes it dry better. It’s good in cold weather too.

I never wait a day though, unless it’s an oil based enamel - that takes ages to dry.


#3

I don’t know if this helps but I’ve sprayed clear coat with a spray gun (not from a spray can) on my projects for my classes but I usually put on one coat, let it dry for an hour or so and put on another coat or two. You don’t want to spray too much on just one coat or the clear coat will start to run and it’ll dry like that. But you can always sand out the imperfections with a super fine sand paper and polish the surface afterwards. When it starts to bubble between coats, it’s called “Orange Peel” because it looks like the skin of an orange but with a little sanding, it gets rid of it. Clear coats usually dries within a few hours but it doesn’t hurt to leave it out longer to let it fully dry if you are skeptical about it.


#4

Practice practice practice. test it out first if you have some spare materials lying around check it out see how it reacts. i think my brother used some of that clearcoat-n-a-can before and it didn’t turn out so well


#5

I would recommend you just follow the installation instructions on the side of the can for the product you are using.

For almost any clear coat in a spray can, you can apply multiple light coats within one hour. If going over paint, that is all you need, 2 light coats. Let it dry for 3 days, and then wax it. Done

The reason most manufacturers recommend that you re-coat within one hour or after 24 hours is that the clear coat dries in a 2 step process. First the main solvent (liquid) evaporates and the clear coat is no longer tacky. After 3 or 4 hours the clear coat begins to coalesce, the molecules of the clear coat form a bond that cannot be re-dissolved in the solvent. When the clear coat coalesces it gives off a light gas. This ?gassing off? is what produces the bubbles.

So get that second coat on before the initial solvent starts to evaporate or wait till the clear coat gasses off, then scratch the surface with light sandpaper and coat again.

Shellac is different. Don?t use shellac based clear coats. They can always be re-dissolved.


#6

Thank you for all of you recommendations. I’m very appreciative.