Questions about looking for stick art


#1

How can I tell what dpi a picture is? From my understanding, it doesn’t have much to do with the resolution.

Anyone know a good place I can go to start looking?


#2

You tell dpi by opening the file in Photoshop or a comparable program. DPI is a function of resolution compared to the size of the image, if I understand it right. 300dpi is the range you are looking for. Saddly, most web images are much less dpi.


#3

Right Click -> Properties -> Summary -> Advanced

It should show you the Horizontal and Vertical dpi


#4

so it should be as high as 300?!? I thought it was much less.


#5

300+ is optimum for printing high quality images, you can get away with less, but i wouldn’t recommend using anything less than at least 100-150


#6

Thanks for all the info!


#7

DPI doesn’t really exist in a jpg or something, since jpegs aren’t for print. DPI is the result of a mathematical formula. It’s Dots Per Inch. You can make any image ANY DPI, by forcing it to print a certain size.

a 300x300 image printed at 300 DPI is 1 inch by 1 inch.

a 600x600 image printed at 300 DPI is 2 inches by 2 inches.

a 600x600 image printed at 150 DPI is 4 inches by 4 inches.

Hope that helps. =)


#8

So basically what you’re saying is, if I want an image 9 inches high, and it’s only 400x560, I’m going to need to find a higher-resolution image in some magical corner of the Intarwebs, huh?


#9

No. Basically what he’s saying is that the dpi just determines how many pixels are printed per inch. Dpi isn’t an inherent property of an image so you can change that in photoshop to suit your needs, but depending on the initial resolution and quality of your source image and format, blowing it up will have some negative consequences on the print quality.

If you don’t mind a little blurriness and seeing some artifacts printed out, you could print out a smaller image to be 9 inches high. Though if you can’t stand that, then yeah, i guess basically you need to find a higher resolution image in some magical corner of the intarweb. :<

The way I see it, an image will only look as good on paper about as good as that image at that size looks on your screen.


#10

Okay, back on the same page now. Jeez…people can really run you for a loop when they start talking about stuff you think they know about. Everything’s as it always was, and my solution was to vectorize it and blow it up like crazy. :slight_smile:

www.inkscape.org for a free, open-source vector graphic tool. YMMV on tracing bitmaps though.


#11

Adobe Photoshop CS2 plus very careful and many small adjustments are what I use to help get my pictures bigger.


#12

Divide the horizontal resolution by the width of the desired printed image. e.g. you have a 1200x900 image, and you want to print it out as a 6"x4" photo, you’d have a 200 dpi resolution.

Not sure how it works when the aspect ratios aren’t the same. (e.g. 1200x900 to 6"x3")