resolved.


#1

#2

Those are reasonable things for someone who has only been playing for three months to have problems with.

You keep track of the timing by practicing in training mode/trial and error.


#3

Combos in sf4 are hard. Have you tried V?


#4

You don’t need to count between moves to do links.

Learning combos is best done learning the rhythm. You’re not going to count frames between moves.


#5

#6

You progress seems very reasonable IMO. Even if you can’t get the rhythm eventually it just becomes part of your muscle memory. An extreme example is walking. Many people don’t realise there’s a rhythm to walking because they’re so used to doing it. It’s kind of the same thing with combos.


#7

Some people it takes a long time to get links down, Im one as well. Just practice for a set amount of time every day, go online to try to land that link even if u don’t have it 100% half the battle is learning the combo, the other had is getting over the fear of dropping it in a match


#8

#9

Does your condition prevent you from ever achieving reliability with your timing? If it’s something that could theoretically be overcome through practice, then that is what you need to do.

I’ve never been someone who was good at timing and execution. I still mess up Chun’s BnB in SFV, and I’ve probably done it thousands of times by now. I’d expect to be better having been a musician for 20 years. Maybe I just smoke too much weed.


#10

#11

Well then, maybe play someone like Gief, who can do massive damage without combos.


#12

#13

Well dyscalculia can severely impact your understanding of frame data. Since your brain is wired differently, it can be difficult for you to interpret that information & understand why moves are safe/ unsafe or why moves comes out fast/slow. You also might have trouble understanding why moves have frame advantages on block, the James Chen’s method makes it easier to understand the concept behind block advantage where record your dummy to keep holding up to jump, & if the dummy can’t avoid your next attack by jumping out it after blocking a attack that means your attack has block advantage & you can apply more pressure on your opponent where you can make them scared of pressing buttons.

It can severely impact your pattern recognition. That makes it even more difficult to emulate that situation in the training mode through dummy record/playback without using a match vid as a reference since dyscaulic have to work harder than anyone else to figure out a strategy against a fireball pattern due impaired ability to keep track of how many fireball that your opponent throws.

It can be difficult for you to learn the timing of your links, tick throw setups, combos, teching throws, & anti airs without seeking any help. I don’t think canceling requires timing because you’re only inputting a special move immediately after a cancelable normal attack.

It can severely impact your spacing. So you may have trouble judging the difference between your attack space & your opponents attack space. It can be difficult to understand which character has better normal attack range. So playing footsies against a opponent can be a uphill battle for you

It can severely impact your ability to remember the game score. So before you start playing your opponent in a tournament , I’d recommend that you go back to the main menu screen so that the game counts for you by resetting the game score. If you play off-stream, Its a good idea to take pictures of the game score with your phone so that you won’t lose that information when a Tournament Organizer asks you for the game score

While you may not have trouble inputting a motion such as a fireball motion, shoryken motion, half circle motion or Spinning Pile Driver motion since it requires motor skills. Learning the timing of when to press button after finishing a input can get tricky for you. For example, you wanted to do a command grab but you get a jab instead. That’s because mistimed the button by pressing it before you finish the input.

There’s a info about dyscalculia that I’d like to show anyone who don’t know anything about it. It can help you guys answer his questions a little better.

http://ldhope.com/resources/dyscalculia-myths/

https://www.understood.org/en/learning-attention-issues/child-learning-disabilities/dyscalculia/understanding-dyscalculia