"Riding the Gate"


#1

Do the pro’s use smaller concise movements when using the stick or do they push the stick to the walls of the gate?


#2

I can’t speak for any “pros” but I know you do not have to hit or follow the gate to register the movements. Also, the distance the stick travels before registering can vary depending on the type or brand of stick you have.


#3

Yea I know. You can feel the little clicks.


#4

Hitting the gate is more distance, more energy, more effort. Do “Pro’s” ride the gate? Maybe they do, maybe they don’t. Maybe it doesn’t matter. Maybe whoever has enough speed and energy to spare. Or maybe whatever game doesn’t demand that kind of precision.

Regardless of what the pro’s do, swinging to the gate is less efficient then just swinging enough to activate the switch. Whether it matters or not…


#5

I’d say that’s quite a bit of hypothetical’s there. Maybe, but maybe not?


#6

I think the point of 4r5’s post was that it doesn’t matter what they do, which is why it was lined with so many maybes. He doesn’t know, and he doesn’t care. So he doesn’t know for sure because it’s not worth knowing for sure. However much I understand the point he is trying to make, he makes some assumptions about why you ask (as I do also), but then he doesn’t clearly answer them.

When 4r5 says “Maybe they do, maybe they don’t,” I think a better way to put it is, “Some of them do, some of them don’t” (which makes sense because you asked a fairly specific question regarding a fairly large group of people). There are high level players who have less than perfect execution (from what I’ve heard, Arturo Sanchez is the textbook example here), so some of them may not have the precision to just hit the sensors without riding the walls of the gate.

Even if they all had perfect execution, I imagine some of them would still ride the gate just due to personal preference (like how they grip the stick).


#7

I really do think it comes down to preference. In theory it seems like riding the gate is a little unnecessary. But for some people, they may like the feeling of having an actual wall there so they know they’re inputting the command correctly. I personally just got my fight stick (Hori EX2) a few days ago and I’m still riding the gate, and I’m trying to get away from it so I can make quicker movements. But I’m still able to get my combos out while riding the gate, so it just depends on what you want to do. (Like 410 and 4r5 have been saying)


#8

If you’re talking JLFs: For circular motions, I doubt it. For charge characters, probably.

But people are more likely to ride LS32s.


#9

Honestly, everyone does it differently. Just find what works best for you and do it your own way. Really really don’t worry about how other people are doing it. The only common thread you’ll find among top players is that they have the utmost confidence in their own personal methods because they’ve practiced them a million times.

I could add, though, that there are more and less common ways of doing certain motions, but these are generally based/dependent on the type of joystick being used, the types of motions emphasized in the particular game being played, as well as any previous background (both in terms of games and arcade parts) that each player may or may not have. This should be noted only for curiosity’s sake and should not become a guide for how you yourself should use your controls.


#10

Having played on Japanese balltops with square gates in arcades since I was 14, riding the gate is the first thing you learn not to do for circular motions. You wan your motions to be precise and efficient. Riding a square gate only really works for charge characters.


#11

So would it be any better if you switched to the octo gate? I find myself always doing the full half square motion and its starting to piss me off :frowning: If i updated, which one do i need? I have the TE stick (and the se one)


#12

Not really. Riding the gate on an octo is still using unnecessary movement.

Just go practice.


#13

i dont know… it seems more like theory to me… when i played at the arcade EVERYONE rode the gates… they just dont FULLY ride them when doing qcf’s and stuff… there is a reason why so many people like a square gate over a circle or octagon…

if no one rode the gates then the gate shape wouldnt matter (cause they would never be touching them)… which is i think, enough to dispel this little myth about not riding gates.

-dime


#14

The square gate is favored because charge characters and also because the short throw allows you to activate moves faster.


#15

The throw doesnt allow you to activate moves faster since the engage length is still the same.

I agree with Dime.

I ride the (square) gate when blocking, doing uppercuts, dive kicks & head stomps, but when doing fireballs or spinning pile drivers I try not to.

When using an LS-32 I could feel the microswitches and barely ever rode the gate, except when blocking. With my old JLF I could barely feel the microswitches but with my new JLF I can feel them nicely, so it helps me a bit more.


#16

My advice is to slowly move the joystick around the gate a couple times. See how big the gate is and where going exactly will get you forward and back.


#17

So is it wrong for me to ride the gate? I feel better doing it that way, and my hands are fast enough to compensate for doing it.

Should I attempt to change?


#18

Does this really matter at all though? I mean as long as you can execute im assuming the difference is just preference. I don’t even know if i ride the gate or not, if i had to guess id say on some moves yes and on some no.


#19

Do what feels good. I doubt you’ll ever come across a match where you walk away saying, “I would’ve won if I wasn’t riding the gate.” It’s like bowfacekillah says:

Sometimes when I’m playing solo (practice or against CPU), I’ll try a DP and miss it. Then is when I consciously ride the gate just so I don’t mess it up the second time. So I guess I do it when I want to be on the safe side. But I try not to think about it most of the time.


#20

For QCFs, you can start by learning to tap the bottom and forward (right/left) edges of the gate. Pull down so that you hit the gate, the move forward and slightly up so that you only hit the forward edge of the gate, not the corner.