Shigeru Miyamoto steps down


#1

…from his current position at Nintendo: http://www.wired.com/gamelife/2011/12/miyamoto-interview/

Just saw this on Twitter. He’s going to work on smaller games now. I’m pretty sure Yu Suzuki did the same thing.


#2

WHAT THE FUCK was my reaction out loud when I saw the thread title. Still, what the fuck?

God does not step down!


#3

Just saw this, RIP nintendo, sell your shares now


#4

Soooo… whose buying that new console?


#5

I wasn’t buying it before he stepped down so meh.


#6

I suddenly feel very sad. I hope to god whatever he’s working on now is just as amazing as 1st party Nintendo titles tend to be.


#7

His latest game was Steel Diver… not surprised at all.

But I don’t think resignation of Miyamoto will solve ongoing woes of Nintendo. The company has a lot of deep rooted problems that has been ignored for years that’s finally beginning to significantly threaten them, and Iwata being at top sure isn’t helping any of it.


#8

Too much oversensationalizing. He’s not leaving. He’s just changing positions.


#9

This isn’t a bad thing. Miyamoto was at his best when he was actually creating games, not just overseeing them. The Legend of Zelda and Mario are in very capable hands, they don’t need Miyamoto watching over their shoulders anymore.

It’s also a great thing that he’ll be working with younger developers while he’s at it. The Japanese industry is still very much reliant on the veterans that pioneered console games decades ago. Unlike the West, there are relatively few fresh faces making a name for themselves, taking chances, etc. Hopefully this will unearth and nurture some new talent at Nintendo.


#10

Technically, since midway through the GC life cycle, Miyamoto hasn’t really headlined a game like he used to. He still gave input, told folk how he would do it and they did it, but you can tell, outside of being the creative force behind a game or two, he wasn’t really captain of his titles any more.

That being said, I am ok with this. It is a little sad but all masters must eventually give up the craft and according to the 1up article I read on this, he is doing it in a way where hopefully, he will be able to inspire some next great developer within his company’s ranks. He will always be a legend for what he did but probably no better time to slowly let others in the company shine brighter then himself then the start of a new system era.


#11

I don’t see this as a bad thing. He’s just working on smaller projects, newer ideas, with younger developers. That kinda ~ish I would suppose.


#12

Besides Miyamoto, I don’t think there’s anyone else from the golden age anymore.