Should Older Video Games Be In The Public Domain?


#1

the dude who made Duke Nukem responded with: https://twitter.com/georgeb3dr/statuses/428565882608967680

RPS responded with: http://www.rockpapershotgun.com/2014/02/03/editorial-why-games-should-enter-the-public-domain/

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There are things I’m very happy to ‘steal’, like knowledge, inspiration, or good ideas. And it was until incredibly recently that amongst such things as knowledge, inspiration and good ideas were the likes of literature and music.


#2

Its not the gaming industry I would blame. Blame the Film and Music Industry.

Disney’s Mickey Mouse first appeared in 1928, he will be 86 next November. Still Copyrighted.

The Happy Birthday Song using the melody of Good Morning to All was written in 1893, Warner Music Group still owns the copyright to. It is why restaurants like Applebee’s can’t actually sing this song to you on your birthday and they used their own retarded birthday song instead. - Wikipedia

Copyright Term Extension Act was a huge disservice to the American people and the collective of world culture

Video Games Industry is only a some 43 years old, as 1971 was when the commercial release of Computer Space which was the first arcade cabinet and a port Spacewar! of written byMIT students Martin Graetz, Steve Russell, and Wayne Wiitanen’s on a DEC PDP-1 computer (a 1961 Mainframe Computer).


#3

Actually Mickey is trademarked. So while older Mickey cartoons (Steamboat Willie or whatever) will enter the public domain in 2023, Mickey himself as a character is trademarked, and only Disney can use him in new products/releases.


#4

I overlooked that some how.

Well at least Trademarks laws are written to protect the consumer rather than the trademark owner. If Mickey Mouse fall too much as a generalized use Disney would loose there trademark.
Escalator was a trade mark, Escalator brand moving stairs. It is why we aren’t supposed to use a brand name instead of the actual item’s name in MLA format writing, you have to say facial tissue not Kleenex, Photocopier not Xerox, and bandages not Band-Aids.


#5

Yeah if a company has enough money and pull, they can deny the public domain of their works indefinitely.

Mickey Mouse and Superman should have been public domain already.


#6

the irony being that nobody currently working for Disney had any involvement in anything Mickey related from back in the day. Hell, aside from marketing and merchandise, when was the last time Mickey was in his own cartoon or movie? I can only really recall Epic Mickey as anything new from him in the last few years.