SNES system Question


#1

I remember having one version of the system when i was kid and later on hearing there were more then one version of it. Which version of the console was the best? I plan on buying a SNES since i still have a small collection of games from the console and lately been having the urge to play them ^^;


#2

If you want to increase your small collection, I’m selling all my SNES games, link in sig.


#3

Depends partially on what T.V. you have. I’ve heard only the bigger original units have S-video output through the Multi-A.V. Out Jack. If you can find the appropriate cord to stick in there and have a T.V. with an S-video input, you should get a sharper image coming from the unit.

If you care about this, I’d recommend the Gamecube Monster S-video cable. This is because the official Nintendo ones, if they exist, are near impossible to find and I’ve read reviews to the effect that some of the others were wired improperly, leading to weird lines on the screen.

On the other hand S-video seems to be getting phased out of modern televisions because more stuff uses the yellow composite cable. Be sure to check the back and sides of your T.V. for the port. Being able to use the best video cord is a nonfactor if you can’t plug it in to your set.

If you don’t care about or can’t use it, the SNES Jr. is about a little over one third smaller if you’re short on space. However at the same time it doesn’t have an eject button. That means you have to rip the cartridges out of the top…

Not much reason not to get the first model, if you can.


#4

I just want to get one that will work efficiently for a longer period. I dont care about size or how good the video quality is, system performance is only what i care about.


#5

In that case I can only vouch for the first one. I had a small but heavy CRT T.V. fall on it twice. Cracked the case so that there was a small hole on the point of impact, but it worked perfectly for a few months until the dust killed it… Again I’d recommend investing in the cord because the R.F. switch seems to be more susceptible to the wires breaking with kinks. If you don’t care about visual quality, an N64 composite cable would work nicely. Aside from the one aforementioned, I never saw one die on me and I have several. Nintendium’s pretty powerful stuff.

Gotta related question though. Do you have any games you’d want to save with? If so, there’s a chance that the batteries are are dead. 'cause yes, each game stored their save data on cart, in RAM, preserved by batteries. Batteries which should mostly all be past their expiration dates by now. [media=youtube]sEXltSby-UU]They can be replaced *if[/I[/media] Yes, I know, you were talking about the system, not the games. Still this is probably the more immediate issue at hand, so far as longevity is concerned.


#6

There’s two versions of the Super NES, they’re all compatible with any of the N64/GC S-Video cables and video connectors, the redesigned(slightly smaller) version lacks an RF jack. You might also check out the FC consoles, the FC Twin or FC3. The Twins are a 2-in-1 Super Nintendo/OG Nintendo with Super Nes styled controllers-the FC3 is a 3-in-1 Super NES/Genesis/NES combo, has controllers similiar to Genesis six buttons. They’re both fairly reliable, thought the FC3 gets some weird ass button configs for some games


#7

Get the original. There are a lot of fakes of the small model. The fake ones have high quality plastic molds but cheaper shoddy electronics and it is hard to tell without opening it.


#8

i didnt know that…guess ill have to get the tool to open them up with. Guess ill grab the same one i had before then ^^;


#9

uno problem…the link to the battery replacement doesnt work >>


#10

The SNES2 is not compatible as-is with S-Video. Nor is it compatible with RGB (although the system can be modded to output it). If you don’t really care much about visual quality (and to be fair, most folks on SRK are pretty acceptable of composite), then either model works just fine.