Soldering with Liquid flux


#1

Does anybody use liquid flux for soldering 360 PCB’s? like in this video

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I am having trouble soldering precisely with a 360 PCB and considering using liquid flux.
Or, are all you padhackers just that good and I’m just a noob.


#2

the surface you’re soldering on has to be really clean.
put some soldering tin on the wire itself, clean the soldering iron so it has just the minimum of tin on it, warm the soldering surface A BIT (just a bit or you will screw the pad/tracks) and put some tin, then solder the wire.

test you connection with a multimeter (between ground and signal) or/and the controller itself on pc by touching the gnd wire and the signal wire you just soldered.

once you’re sure it works, you should use some hot glue so it doesn’t ever brake or move again.


#3

Thanks for the advice! A regular glue gun will suffice? Or is there some type of electrical glue I should know about? Non conductive sneeze glue goo?


#4

regular glue gun is fine :slight_smile:


#5

You need practice, not flux. The solder you have already contains plenty of flux (ever notice a clearish or brownish-yellow liquid around your solder points? That’s the flux in the solder.) Use flux if you’re working with older joints that someone else has done, or if you’ve reheated and cooled the solder so many times that the flux has burned away and the solder has trouble heating up.

If your solder joints are weak, the problem is that you aren’t heating to two components you’re trying to solder together (the wire and the pad). Solder isn’t glue. It isn’t sticky. The idea is that you heat up the pad and wire so that the solder molecules actually intermingle with both piece and make a single chunk of metal. That’s what makes it strong. Get some practice soldering properly and you’ll find yourself using very little solder and not needed any flux but what is already in the spool of solder.

  1. Use stranded wire, not solid. Solid wire puts too much pressure on the solder joint when moved.
  2. Don’t use hot glue. If its a bad solder joint, fix the solder joint.

#6

Yeah I guess it is just practice. Thanks.