Some questions


#1

Do any top players use the 360 pad at a high level? Or do you get to a certain standard then need to move onto the fight stick to play better?

Where is the cheapest fightstick in the UK? For the Madcatz TE tournament ones I think I can only see them for around 99. Anywhere cheaper? Anyone on here selling one?

What’s everyones opinion on the new chars in ssfiv? Who’s the ones that haven’t been announced yet?

Cheers!


#2

Very few people use pad at a high level, and I don’t know a single person that uses 360 pad, even at low levels. A stick will help your execution, I think, but I don’t think you should rush out and get one if you’re not serious about the game. Try Street Fighter for a while, see how you like it, and try to improve. If you feel the investment is worth it, go for the stick.

The cheapest stick I can think of that wouldn’t crap out on you is either the Tekken 6 wireless stick which I think is going on ebay for like $30, or the Madcatz SE, which is probably like $60 now. Either way, you’ll probably have to mod both of these sticks because the parts aren’t exactly the best.


#3

The Hori EX2 is about $40 on Amazon, and it’s stock parts aren’t terrible.

I know top MvC2 players taht use the Dreamcast pad (Fanatiq) and good ST players that use either a computer keyboard (there’s even a guy that brings his modded keyboard to tournaments) or a PS2 pad.


#4

Try to avoid the T6 wireless stick since most tourneys don’t allow wireless sticks/pads.


#5

Talk about SSFIV in general here:
http://www.shoryuken.com/showthread.php?t=209986&page=1
or
http://www.shoryuken.com/showthread.php?t=209520&page=1

Each revealed character has a discussion thread in the SSFIV section.


#6

Friends don’t let friends play on 360 Pads. If you want to play the game in any sort of level of seriousness, get a decent stick: The Hori EX2 should be your very minimum in the accepted stick list.


#7

Mayflash is worse than EX2 but doable. That should be the least accepted stick.


#8

I never understood why people think keyboards would be harder to do inputs on than a stick. Inputs are totally precise and the only thing I can think would be harder to do on a keyboard would be a standing 720. Actually when starting out I think it’s much easier to lean to use a keyboard than a stick.

On topic: I would either get a TE stick or an SE with the intention of modding it later. In the long run those are the two most cost effective options as the parts in the TE should last longer than other sticks and are nicer to use anyway. Also other sticks are much harder to mod than these two.

So which out of TE and SE is better? Modding an SE will end up costing the same as buying a TE and the size of the TE is much nicer imo. Also the parts in the SE will start to break at about 50 hours play time (yep, madcatz still haven’t totally redeemed themselves and their previous quality control issues). However by getting an SE you have the option of using whatever custom parts you want instead of being stuck with a jlf and obsf-30 buttons and as the SE stick parts are lower quality copies of the parts in the TE you can make an assessment from using an SE when it comes to upgrading your parts if you want a stick with a shorter throw, tighter spring etc.


#9

on a PC, a keyboard drops 3 simultaneous inputs. I can’t teleport with sim or do a level 3 super in Alpha 2 without a macro.
Come to think about it, I can’t even switch characters with the 6 and 3 on the number pad in Xmen vs. Street Fighter. Those two keys don’t register together at all.
This is why the dude uses a “modded” keyboard. He took only the keys he needs, wired them up to a cthulu and uses it to play with.

720s give you carpal tunnel

If you bring a keyboard to a tournament, you’re going to have to change your key configuration (most likely) and that will cause delays

Also, for a big tournie like Evo or SBO that’s ONLY console or ONLY arcade, you wont be able to particpate it.


#10

Old/cheap keyboards drop inputs, better keyboards shouldn’t. If in doubt look for a keyboard that has ‘no ghosting’ advertised, then you know you can press any number of keys simultaneously.


#11

Still doesn’t change the fact that you can’t bring them to the two biggest tournaments in the world.

I have a Lycosa and a diNova Edge, neither of which will allow me to press three things at once for ST teleports and Alpha 1/2 level 3 supers. So I wouldn’t necessarily say “cheap” or “old” keyboards.

EDIT - the keyboard I use on my PC all the time -
http://www.logitech.com/index.cfm/keyboards/keyboard/devices/192&cl=us,en
DiNovo Edge

http://www.razerzone.com/gaming-keyboards/razer-lycosa/
The one that I have sitting in the corner of my room getting almost no use.


#12

Ha that keyboard is amazing yet it can’t pick up 3 inputs at a time? I know even that crappy keyboards at my school pick up at least 4 at a time.


#13

The lycosa has no ghosting on only specific keys around wasd (to save cost) so you have to either map your keys specificly, or get a keyboard like the tarantula. das keyboard is another good option (http://www.daskeyboard.com/). While the keyboard you use all the time is expensive, obviously again to save manufacturing costs they decided on cheaper internals, so a lower simultaneous key press limit - but that keyboard looks as though it’s only designed for typing not gaming so I guess that’s not really an issue for the majority of its owners.

And yes, you can’t use a keyboard in arcade tourneys, but then neither can you use a pad. My point wasn’t about the practicality of learning to play on a keyboard, just that I don’t see why many people instantly see someone playing on a keyboard and think it’s an imprecise input method when it really isn’t.

btw I saw someone at evo using a modified stick with buttons instead of the actual stick - there’s absolutely no reason you can’t participate in console tourneys if you choose this input method.


#14

If you just pay the money and get a square gate Sanwa stick and learn a standard 6 button layout, it will help you in the long run.

I say this, because 9/10 setups at tourneys and local meets are likely to be that way, so you will be able to use anyone’s stick (or an arcade machine) without hampering your play.

Just something to consider, but I think its a really good reason to learn that setup, all other things being more or less equal.


#15

Rico Suave running that Halo controller in SF.


#16

^^ haha its a halo controller? I assumed it it was a madcatz pad. But anyway isn’t he trying to switch over to a stick? I thought he played the last battlefield on a stick.


#17

I remember at like Winter Brawl or something he brought out the original xbox controller. Yeah I’m sure he’s using a stick by now though.


#18

I’ll probs get the Hori EX2 then as I can’t really afford the more expensive ones just now as I’m saving up for a holiday.

Cheers for the replies.


#19

I had one of those for like 2 weeks and ended up smashing the shit out of it and throwing it away


#20

Keep in mind the moddability of the stick, especially if you’re not looking or not able to spend a lot right now. The buttons on a Madcatz SE are quickdisconnects that make them relatively easy to swap out when you get the money to mod it, while Hori sticks traditionally have theirs soldered to the board.

Something to keep in mind, because in my opinion the buttons are the most critical part of a stick. I’d hate to recommend madcatz otherwise.