ST or 3S to to learn the ropes?


#1

Which of those two games would be best to start out and practice against other people to get the general basics and mindset down (reactions, punishing, reading your opponent, etc).

As much as I want to be practicing through Tekken 6 and SF4, I don’t have access to them anywhere near as much as I do to those two games.


#2

ST would probably be the better fundamentals game. IMO. You should check the BK thread too. Having another gathering this Sunday.


#3

ST teaches you all the basics about 2D games. It teaches you footsies, zoning, etc.


#4

Go with ST, it has the fundamentals behind every fighting game (well maybe not 2D ones.) Then again, i started with 3s, so who am I to speak. >_>


#5

ST to learn basic’s fundamentals and footsies. and the correct motion and you dont have to worry about shortcuts!


#6

3S is much harder to learn, IMO. SFIV plays closer to SFII, so I would use ST to learn IV.


#7

use ST to learn, 3s is a bit too unique to learn fundamentals with, especially with the parry system.


#8

Should try A2 as well.

It really depends on what character you’re playing in 4 though imo.


#9

Wow, what a heated argument but it seems to me majority believe 3s to be the game to play.

Well, I guess my first stop is reading up on all the info of ST. As for characters, I always had a strange feeling towards charge characters since majority of fighters don’t really have charge characters. Either way, I remember playing Dhalsim on HDR at clapper’s gathering a bit ago and definitely enjoyed it. So I’ll check Dhalsim out first.

Appreciate the help guys.


#10

ST is definitely the game to learn fundamentals correctly.

You can still learn the basics with 3S, but you’ll most likely end up learning everything backwards(first character basics, then blocking, then parrying, then parrying everything, then learning not to parry, then footsies/zoning).


#11

You ain’t even got to go to summer school.

http://www.super-turbo.net/


#12

Heated argument? Six of the first seven replies said ST… What are you reading?


#13

What he wanted to read? <_<


#14

3S will teach you more about modern SF juggle mechanics than ST will (the general juggle hierarchy of supers, EX moves, and Ultras, as well as the height and timing necessary to make juggles work), but for everything else, of those two games, ST is still closest to SF4. 3S game speed is closer to SF4, but it requires very different fundamentals; the game revolves much more around creating/defeating parries and creating/defeating close-range offense than other SFs, where fireball zoning is stronger and jumping in is weaker due to the lack of air parry. There also are a lot fewer links of note in 3S that don’t involve one normal -> super (much less of the Akuma jab -> stand roundhouse and Ryu low strong x2 -> whatever pain train kinda stuff), and meter management is different because supers and EX are on the same meter.

Personally, though, if you want a game to learn fundamentals on, I would reccommend CvS2. The general footspeed and normal speed is much closer to the pace of SF4, and it is an excellent platform to learn footsies on because the game is so pokey. You tend to gain ground in most matchups at about the same rate as you do in SF4 (even playing the non-Capcom grooves), and you learn how to bait and punish a lot of the same things you could beat with EX/Focus in SF4 by way of roll cancel (for most of the same functionality as an EX reversal) and roll/parry/dodge/JD. (Roll that telegraphed sweep and make them pay, or offer them a tantalizing gap in your blockstring to attempt a roll and start the low short pain train.)

Also, the game is awesome and more people should play it. Go! Do it now!


#15

To OP: Seriuosly man, I just went through all this shit as I’ve only been playing fighting games for the past year. With all the new releases it was really exciting and everything to have the opportunity to play all these brand new games with crazy systems and mechanics and all that shit…

BUT the truth is, you need to just play ST or HDremix. Those games will teach you the fundamentals that you need to learn BEFORE you even start worrying about shit like Focus attacks and Parrying which will only give you a headache. You will get a feel for ST/HDR MUCH MUCH MUCH faster than you will with any other fighting game because there is hardly any engine to deal with. Its just you vs your opponent. The only thing that will frustrate you is that you’ll get your ass kicked so fast because in ST/HDR everything hits much harder than in SF4. 1 combo plus a few pokes can easily be GG, whereas in every other game, you’re in it for a lot longer. Don’t let that decieve you thouhg, you’re not lasting longer in other games because youre better, ST/HDR is just that way. Matches can seriously end in less than 10 seconds.

Put all the other games down for a few months, focus on ST/HDR. They are fun as fuck and not near as convoluted as all other fighting games.

And, Seriously, anyone that recommends 3s as a first start (to the poster above me, CvS2… you’re recommending CvS2 to learn the fundamentals… Are you retarded?) is probably just a fanboy that doesn’t want his game to die because he’s pissed off that SF4 is taking over. I love SF3, CvS2, SF4, BB, but recommending anything other than ST or HDR isn’t even arguable.


#16

play sf4 to get good at sf4… imho.

no game is “good enough” to learn to play sf4 on, except for… sf4.

its like playing st to learn 3s, or playing 3s to learn st.

neither game is going to teach you how to play 4.

-dime


#17

Start with SFII for the very basics. Then after you really feel you have that down, move on to 3S, where you will have a lot more to learn.


#18

Learn ST because it teaches you the raw fundamentals, zoning and footsies. Since there’s no super cancel, it will also teach you to buffer and how to input supers faster and more accurately.

Try going from SFIV to 3S and doing super combos versus going from SFIV to ST and doing super combos.


#19

If only SF4 had a juggle system remotely similar to 3s.

Are you? Some of the strongest SF4 players come from a CvS background.


#20

Do you really need me to explain why recommending one of the deepest fighting games to someone who is “learning the ropes” is thoughtless?