Starting to play SSF4 AE when everyone knows how to play online


#5

yesterday night i played an hour in ranked, and out of the 15~ matches 13 were against people with less than 1000 PP.
it might depend on the region you’re playing in, and the time at which you chose to play, but in euro PSN at about 7pm i can guarantee that there are a lot of beginners.


#6

Indeed, I rarely play people above 3KPP on PSN at night. Take it as a learning experience, don’t matter if you get your ass kicked.


#7

i just got the game for pc. kinda late, but figured id give it a shot before sf x tekken. what are my chances of enjoyin this?


#8

problem is that now most character’s strengths and weaknesses are more widely known than one year ago, so it will be more difficult getting a win. play arcade mode at least and try winning some matches on hardest, not finishing the game. it will help you later to grasp the basics from other player’s advice

I am thinking of buying SfxTekken later when DLC characters are available at a cheaper price. no way I am spending 60 $ on a game, buying it full price now and DLC later. I’ll have an offline version for practice though. I’ll fall behind in matches, sure, but I can cover the lost ground.


#9

ah, is there a way to meet up with newbs and play together or something?


#10

Playing the cpu is a waste of time on any difficulty.

just play against people… You’re new and you’re going to lose a lot before you figure it out, but if you keep at it, wins will come. I lost my first 100 online matches and look at me now! a mediocre online warrior with a 30% win rate! WOOHOOO!!!

Pick a character that you like, read up in their sub-forum and practice practice practice!


#11

stick to endless and dont give up against someone just because their rating is really high. just try your best against everyone and you’ll get better


#12

Try to imagine yourself walking into an arcade, where a bunch of seasoned players gather. This is the time to bite the bullet and take those losses as a learning experience. If dudes are trolling you, try to make them stop. Once they think you are a threat they will take you more seriously. Until then, use all the matches as experience. If they are running away from you for example, you can use that fight as practice for chasing someone down.

Just keep at it. It won’t come quickly, but if you play often (I’d say everyday, if you’re looking to get better), you’ll be amazing at where you end up in 6 months. It’s a commitment, but that’s generally how it’s done. Give it 6 honest months.


#13

I mean just to save time applying the basic. it is not advisable buying the game (disc or digital download), launching the game and then going online immediately. learn at least to apply the specials. or else it would be annoying to ask “ehm…how do I Ultra 1?”


#14

I definitely feel your pain Coolfire, I bought the game about three days ago and I want to get good, but people on PSN can be assholes when it comes to new players. I’m really getting pissed at how I’m getting kicked from lobbies after I happen to win or get really close and people trolling as well. If you want, I would be more than happy to do some rounds with you.


#15

I don’t know man, I think that the people you’re playing are likely not as good as you’re making them out to be.

Regardless you should actually be happy! I know it may seem demoralizing but playing against people so far ahead of you in skill is actually a really good way to improve quickly. Good players will exploit your bad tendencies. If you get blown up look at your replay channel and see what happened and why. Were you mashing too much? Did you not tech throws? Did you let people jump in on you for free? etc. etc.

After playing against guys like that all of the players on your level right now will start to look really easy to you. Look at it this way. If you had a chance to play Daigo/Tokido/Alex Valle/ Justin Wong etc. every day would you turn that opportunity down? I know that’s an exaggeration but you get my point.

Also when someone pummels you badly and is way above your skill… try adding them as a friend! My friend’s list on xbox live is full of people above my skill level. A lot of people will accept, especially if you tell them you are trying to improve. And a lot of people will give you advice if you ask. Sure there are some dicks out there, but I only have about 2300 pp and a friend’s list full of players from 3k pp up to 5k pp. Guys who are willing to play endless with me and help me out. What have you got to lose? You’ll only get better.


#16

I can’t write about PSN, but I understand your frustration.
I have been a casual SF player since SF2. I love FGs, but I never delved into Tournament play nor met Higher-level players.
Recently, I have committed to improving my game, ideally for tournaments, but I just want to experience the height of FG gameplay, among other reasons.
I have read many guides, threads, what have you and I understand a great deal.
However, I get my arse kicked quite often. But I will fight ANYONE, and not complain. Fighting the high level players will make you better.
It will be embarrassing at first, but if you keep at it, you will learn and the higher levels will see that you are not giving up and you may get respect for that.
A theory I have that others share, is that your game improves when you play the best, and it worsens when you play scrubs or novices.
I HIGHLY advise reading this book. It will teach you the right mentality for FGs and educate you on how to win.
www.sirlin.net
Then watch TBirdSF4’s tutorials -http://forums.shoryuken.com/t/basic-video-tutorial-guide-for-total-beginners-for-ssf4/99209-.
After that watch VesperArcade’s SSFIV tutorials - http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=744144A71C67D816&feature=iv&annotation_id=annotation_422412&src_vid=1_nS5Jj3pHY

This thread/forum is great as well:

You have to practice and practice and practice times 12, because that’s how the High level players got so good. It’s not an overnight process, so you have to pace yourself and above all else, DO NOT GIVE UP. You will face trolls on ANY game, and we must learn to ignore them, outplay them, and not be a troll.

Hmm, I realized I spend a crapload of time here getting help and also giving help/encouragement. I gotta get my self in training mode!


#17

First, pick a character. Go in training mode with that character and try out all the moves. If you really want to have strong fundamentals, read up which normals you should use. (Or try it out yourself, but it’s so late in the life of this game that it’s easier to look it up)

Second, you just want to play, so go in Arcade Mode and set fight request on to minimize downtime. Playing and trying to use those good normals is a good way to get good fundamentals. (AKA not relying on gimmicks/jump ins like most beginners) Don’t bother learning combos at this point because you won’t be able to execute them if you can’t find an opening anyway. Once you learn how to block and to open up people, now you can start thinking about combos. (I learned to play with Rose with a simple cr.MP xx Spiral won me a lot of games)

After you learn to open people up, you can start learning combos. I personally found Trials to be quite fun, though the combos usually aren’t practical… Pick up an easy combo and then move on to tighter/harder combos. FADC can be awkward to pull off in the beginning, so try not to focus on it too much, it’s not too important at lower levels.


#18

there needs to be a balance though. even good players make sometimes flukes against novices or are outsmarted or surprised. even if I face worse players than me I never try one match, see their skill and leave. usually people expect someone from the first match, just after logging in and with cold hands and without adapting to the opponents tactics, to be able to do wonders, while they usually have done a warm up and played few matches prior to that.


#19

i can’t remember the last time I played Ranked on PSN and was matched with an opponent using a D ranked character (like all of mine). Only C ranks or higher out there, as far as I can tell. I could care less since I prefer Endless, but I imagine it’s gotta be frustrating for players who are new/casual to never be matched against fellow players who are new/casual.

When it comes to Endless, you can do this: You start a lobby and then you kick anyone who joins who is well above your level.


#20

As far as I know, best wya to improving is pushing yourself just beyond what you can do. Playing against JWong or whatever may be eye-opening but not a good learning experience. Being so thoroughly outclassed in every way imaginable just won’t leave you with much, really. The best way would probably be to play against people who are a bit better than yourself. So you’ll probably lose but stand a chance. Playing against people like that often (but not all the time) helps a bunch. Also people a bit worse than you so you can just try out stuff.

Needless to say stay away from the random kangaroos and bunnies.


#21

I don’t agree with this at all. If you start an Endless and someone who is way better than you actually wants to stick around, you be thankful and take your losses and try to learn from them. You’re gonna get better fastest by fighting people who are better than you.


#22

Just play on arcade mode with requests turned on, be sure to leave everything on any. Then just spend the time on hard mode trying to gouken achievement while listening through your album collection. Thats what i do.


#23

A few things.

  1. While it can’t be denied there is value in fighting opponents better than you (a mantra repeated endlessly around here), this can be overstated imo. Watching a pro who is well above your level string elaborate combos on you because you’re constantly dizzy might teach you a thing or two about defense, but fighting someone who, like yourself, has some holes in their game can give you much-needed experience in the basics (punishing mistakes, for instance). Depending on your level and things, I’m not convinced the latter may never actually be a better use of your time.

  2. If you’re the type who can be clobbered over and over again and be having a blast, that’s fantastic. But I think for a lot of people, if not the majority, it’s important that they win at least some of the time–important for their enthusiasm in the game if nothing else.

  3. Perhaps most relevantly, the OP wrote that he wanted to play fellow noobs. I gave him advice to help with finding some.


#24

I’m a beginner Zangief and I played ranked for 2 hours and won 2 games (most satisfying wins I ever had in a fighter), my patience was shot by the end of it after facing spamming shoto after spamming shoto. All good stuff though