Stick Fu(uuuuuuuuuuu)


#1

Just thought id try for some advice and constructive suggestions, I have played a fair few games over the years, and i’ve played a one or two with what might even pass for competence, and with only a short term fascination with a playstation controller the rest of the time i’ve been using a keyboard.
Experience has taught me that this isnt exactly ideal for SF4, but all my prior SF experience has been on a keyboard. (sf2 etc…)
Consequence of this I have spent a long time playing with the arrow keys, and my punch/kick etc… on my left :confused:
I finally decided to switch things up, and buy myself an arcade stick and am finding the transition quite difficult.

I am stuck between the switch in hands (previously the hadouken movement for instance was my right hand) and the challenges of getting used to a stick in general. Its quite embaressing, the guy i would’ve beaten comfortably not 2 weeks ago schools me with his go-to combo cause I didnt combo that shoryuken properly, or cause instead of an ultra i pulled out an ex fireball etc. :smiley:
I guess what I want to know is whether its like this for everyone, and whether anyone else found the ‘right to left’ transition difficult?
Extra bonus points will go to people telling me that there will come a time where i wont want to stab someone in the face, or when I will no longer have to be grateful for the build quality of my fight stick. :bgrin:

I know its probably the same for everyone making the switch, but it feels like i’ve made it twice as hard for myself, cause my left fingers cant remember how to do much more than punch/kick at the same time. I hear some people even play cross-handed, and whilst that sounds like a wrist shatteringly bad plan, i wouldnt mind being able to do the moves I could do only a fortnight ago again :slight_smile:

Tell me of your pain that I might feel less inept. Or laugh. Whichever works.


#2

its the same thing when switching from a controller to a stick, you just have to stick with it, and NOT give up. it will take a little while, sure, but it is so gratifying once you start kicking the shit outta people when you get good with a stick. DO NOT GIVE UP!


#3

Everyone sucks ass when they first start stick. Everyone has that brief period of time where they’re much worse than they were on pad/keyboard, and its frustrating. Just keep playing and play through it, and you’ll get better overall afterwards.

A pretty good analogy for this is using a higher sensitivity in a shooter game. There’s an obvious advantage to using higher sensitivity: you turn around faster and can dart your attention more quickly. At the start, you will try to aim at something and shoot past it because you aren’t used to the sensitivity, so your aim will be shitty for a while. But when you get used to it, you’ll be better.


#4

the debate between pad and stick will forever rage, but in the end, it’s on you as to what you decide to play with. there are advantages to using either, and you need to weigh they out when you make your decision.

-if you play better on a pad and never intend on playing in an arcade or only use a console character, then there’s no real need to use a stick. most of the time, people will get on a stick just because of the peer pressure.

-if you want to play in a tourney setting and want to have a good showing at the local arcade, get on that stick and tough it out. relearning how to input moves may be cumbersome and frustrating, but as long as you learn something from each loss about how you should execute, then it’s not a complete loss.

have fun and the game will take you as far as you want to go.


#5

I am certainly not about to give up, I enjoy the whole affair rather too much, I was just hoping for some sense that everyone else is in the same boat. Losing when you know full well what move is coming and how to counter it, but your useless girly hands fail you at the pivotal quarter circle forward is annoying as hell!
Its strange, there are things i can do with the stick that i could never do with the keyboard, and i found that out straight out of the box as it were, but the execution is going to take time, as i suspect is the muscle memory. That said, ive giving me a wonderful opportunity to try a variety of characters, since it isnt really lack of knowledge of the characters thats letting me down at my current level :smiley:


#6

I’m far from an expert, but you could do what a friend of mine is planning. Build a custom stick, and put the stick on the right and buttons on left. To be honest I’m not sure how it’d turn out, but it’s a thought.


#7

If you are used to having the buttons on the left, you can play cross-handed. I’ve heard of some players doing this such as Seth Killian when he was still playing competitively and he still does.


#8

I wrote this to help players transition to stick. Maybe it will help some:

http://www.shoryuken.com/showthread.php?t=223146


#9

I think it’s like learning how to ride a bike. At first, it feels very weird and awkward. But after you get it, you’ll never forget it! Hee


#10

It’s not so much a raging debate as it is one group constantly looking for approval from everyone else playing on sticks…and when the stick players don’t give it, the former rant and rave about how their equipment isn’t inferior or they get no respect or everyone isn’t open minded, etc, etc, etc.

I’m imagining people bringing dodge balls to a bowling tournament and getting angry…or bringing a rocket launcher to go fishing…or replacing the other team’s pitcher with a T-ball stand…have fun with it. Just don’t get upset when people snicker a little.

Sorry. I’m derailing.

As others have said, you gotta tough it out and practice. You gotta hit that training mode, set your inputs to show up on screen and practice. Eventually you’ll start hitting stuff when you know you’re supposed to in matches. You’ll also occasionally fuck up when it is most crucial not to. Everyone does. At that point it comes down to your clutch and if you can perform under pressure.


#11

The problem I have is with what appears to be skill inconsistantcy. We all like to see progress, it’s nice to have feedback that says “hey, you’re movin’ in the right direction!”. But lately It seems like I’m going backwards. I’ll have a day, maybe a couple days, where I nail the combos I’m trying, anticipate and punish correctly and all around feel like I have improved. Then I’ll turn around and not be able to do the simplest of combos. (example: Today I could not for the life of me get Akuma’s lk hurricane to ANY dragon punch. I was doing it like a madman about a week ago, and suddenly I’ve lost the skill to do it. I’ve tried to slow down and take it easy, I’ve tried turning on inputs and they look correct, just can’t get it out for some reason.) The group I usually play with I can see how they’ve improved over the past year or so but it seems to be a much larger improvement than I see in myself. I try to analyze what I’m doing and sometimes I really can’t see what’s going wrong. Of course when I ask I usually get silence.

I know going back to basics is always a good idea, but when even the basics aren’t working right it’s downright depressing.

It’s so frustrating because I know where I can be, I’ve been there! I only seem to get a glimpse of it every once in awhile.


#12

I just switched from an Xbox 360 controller to a stick. Not as bad as you have it (because left and right hands are the same) but it’s so different, I too am sucking. Stick with it, don’t get into those Fuuuuuuuuuu moments where you want to unplug it and go back to the keyboard and soon you’ll be back up to proficiency. I’m still nowhere near as good as I was with the pad (well, I was never good with the 360 pad but back in my PS1 days on Tekken 3 I was great) but I’m getting better constantly.