Street Fighter IV Habits?


#1

Hey guys, so as you probably already know, the beta of SF5 is upon us (though the server is down as of the time when this thread is posted) and the game itself is coming out about 8-9 months from now (with an approximate release date of March, 2016)
But the previous title, which is SF4, has been out for almost 7 years, and many people have been playing the game since the Vanilla version up, perhaps even up until now - the Ultra version. And I myself has been into the game since 2011-2012.

Due to SF4 being the mainline Street Fighter game for such a long time, it’s no secret that the players have generated various playing habits while playing it, such as getting used to using crouching jabs or shorts as your main combo starters (with cancels or links into specials), focus attack fishing, and maybe even playing in a more defensive fashion rather than an grrwsive one unless you’re a 100% rushdown character like Yun, for example, as well as the timer scamming tactics that are sometimes being used combined with long Ultra animations, during which the timer still goes on so you pretty much save yourself from a loss when the timer is at 10-15 seconds left

But here we have a new Street Fighter game, with different mechanics, different gameplay approach, different combat system, different combo opportunities, etc and it’s obvious that unless you adapt - the described above tactics won’t work since now we have increased damage, the V-Trigger mechanic to appmplify your character’s abilities, chip damage from normals, …

So, here’s my 2 questions when it comes to the habits coming from 4 to 5:

  1. which games would you recommend the best to get rid of them and step up your game fundmanetals like traps and footsies and such?

And 2) how long do you think will it take the players (both on casual and competitive scene) to adapt to the new game and come up with a different approach when it comes to attack the opponent and start your assault on him/her? Could it be that people who abused SF4 mechanics will drop the game altogether?


#2

Play some SFAlpha 1 or Super Turbo

Crouch tech going to be blown up. When I hit db+LP+LK, my character stood up and whiffed a throw. Y’all gonna learn.


#3

Play anything that isn’t SFIV really. Easy way is just to download fightcade on your comp and play some Alpha 2 or 3S. Get you started. Super Turbo works too.


#4

Is there a version for Linux? My Windows machine is currently dead


#5

Nothing.
It’s a waste of time to think you’ll somehow prepare for one game by playing another.

So much of becoming proficient in a game is learning the specifics.


#6

Yes actually.


#7

It might not surprise you that I’m about to praise ST and 3S. I tend to do that whenever I can.

But yeah, ST and 3S work great. Play them. Apparently A2 is also really good, but I haven’t really played that game. I should probably do that some time.

Also, people will adapt. Some people might prefer SF4 and just stick to that, and if they do, that’s fine. I can’t imagine that happening to most people however.


#8

It’s funny that my bad habit of stand teching in situations where I should crouch tech is going to be better for me.

Getting used to not always poking out with lights will be harder


#9

granted i think all fundamentals learned in sf4 at least extremely basic fundamentals (still insanly important) will probably carry over to a certain degree. Plus unless your gamer tarded it should only take a few days if not a week or two to forget that focus attack isnt in the game anymore. For crouch tech just… Idk stop pressing all sorts of buttons? Just wait patiently for the game to come out. Trying to get an “edge” over the competition is dumb and pointless. Say you do get an small edge that edge will vanish with in a day or two. Unless your actually playing sf5 your wasting time trying to get that edge or dropping those habbits.


#10

The bolded is true, but at the same time it never hurts to work on your fundamentals. I think this is especially poignant for folks that may have started fighters with games like SFIV where there’s a larger focus on setups/vortex as opposed to footsies. Play some older stuff and really focus (no pun intended) on developing a solid ground game. Look for bad habits you tend to make in the neutral and work on ironing them out. You’ll still have to learn the specifics of SFV, but at least you’ll have a better foundation.


#11

Nothing wrong with poking out with lights.
They’re designed to get pressure off your ass.
Poking out with lights and converting into big damage is not in SFV though unless you got super.


#12

I like to practice special move inputs and two-in-ones in ST since it has less input leniency than newer games in the series. Even when I played SF4, I spent a lot of time keeping my inputs crisp in HD Remix’s training mode. You can also do this with the PS2 and Xbox ports of Hyper Street fighter 2 and the Dreamcast port of ST since they have training modes.


#13

False. There’s a reason why players who are dominant in previous titles tend to be dominant in newer titles. It’s because much of your skill can be applied universally in fighting games. I’d say playing 3rd strike and and some ST would be your best route to bettering your over all fundamental skill.


#14

Play Yatagarasu. Picking Aja will give you a feel for the game’s movement (slow walk, lightning quick dashes).


#15

just play sfv over and over til the bad habits are weeded out simple af wtf cmon now


#16

For the most part they’re not though. How many of the super strong 3s players are super strong in SF4 (or vice versa)? It’s a very small percentage. The overlap in skills is not that much. For every Justin Wong who transitioned well there were dozens of very strong 3s players who can’t play 4 worth a hill of beans. These are players who have great ground game, who make smart decisions, who have good execution, and even with all this they suck at SF4. I suspect this is true for most of the community - most people are good at 1-2 games, and these games are the ones they’ve invested a lot of time into.

Being good at any fighting game comes down to game knowledge, I think. There may be some overlapping general concepts that define good play, but IMO they’re nebulous. To me “fundamentals” is just another way to say “makes sound decisions based on understanding of the game + consideration of risk vs reward, and executes them reliably.” It isn’t some cloud of “fighting game skill” that permeates your being and goes across all games.


#17

I played vs some sf4 players in sf5 they just mash jab all day pretty funny to see.


#18

The only reason why they didn’t transition well is because 3rd strike players are snobs and hate sf4. The ones who did like sf4 transitioned very well and play it far better than the majority of 09er’s. When you hold the variable of time played for sf4 as even for all players, the players who have a lot of experience in 3S and ST will be far more dominant than the ones who do not.


#19

No, believe me, that’s not the only reason. You really do need to play SF4 quite differently from 3S, so while background experience isn’t useless, the transition isn’t particularly smooth.

I beat most of my local playerbase in 3S and ST without much of an issue. I don’t stand a chance against almost anyone in SF4. The skills that allow me to beat them in the old games don’t pay off that much in SF4, and vice versa.