Switching up my training regime?


#1

Well I’ve been playing just about every competitive fighting game that’s came out ever since I was in 7th grade, and I consider myself to be pretty good. But the thing is I’ve never really sat down and practiced in any of them (except a couple A groove combos in CvS2 last year). Like bnb combos and shit I would just learn by playing matches with a few of my boys and I’d kind of learn how to play with my characters on the fly.

But now with my newfound love for koF98UM and SFIV/HDR coming out, and me getting introduced to new competition both in person and over 2df and seeing just how important mastering your execution is, I think I’m going to switch up how I learn a character(s) and actually take the time to practice poke strings and combos and stuff.

I was just wondering, SRK what do you recommend for a “training regime” of sorts…like how should I practice and what should I practice? Like I know how to play the games and I know about the systems and all that, but since I’ve never actually practiced before, I want to know the best way for me to be able to get the most out of a character I choose and how I should approach practicing, if it’s more than just “Practice this combo until you could do it without thinking” cause I know there’s probably more than that.

-Fritz:wonder:


#2

I have a somewhat structured method to practicing combos.

First off is training mode. That’s a no brainer. Most long setups and combos benefit from being broken down into 2 or 3 different parts.

Once I’m solid against a dummy, practice against the computer to be able to do it in real matches. This helps a lot.

Then just start using them in real matches. Take advantage of input displays like in cvs2. Also don’t just keep drilling things over and over. If you can’t get a combo, try slowing down the timing, or speeding it up. Make an adjustment each time until you are getting it. Just spamming the same wrong input over and over doesn’t help. Also keep practicing things you already know!! You’ll unlearn it if you don’t.


#3

Execution is probably the most important thing in many FG’s, and training mode is where you’ll learn. Without it, your nothing. The most famous FG moment was only possible because of countless hours in training mode just practicing.

Honestly, “Practice this combo until you could do it without thinking”, sums up training mode in many fighting games.

And what Pherai said is true.

Training > CPU > Casuals > Important Matches (Like MM’s)

Once your execution is great with one, try to get down the next.


#4

I appreciate this advice.

Another question is how would you go about practicing proper defense and dealing with certain moves and how to beat them? Like for example.

When I was playing Neowave ALOT with my boy, I’d use Clark/Yuri and either Shingo, Chang, Ralf or Daimon as my lead character. I’d pretty much beast on him until I got to Takuma. He has high priority moves and he’d start preventing the OCV or sometimes even coming back cause I didn’t know how to counter/deal with his moves or defend against them cause 8/10 times, his moves would flat out beat mine.

I get the practicing combos part, but I need to also figure out a good way to practice improving my defense against characters with match-ups and playstyles I’m not used to as well.

-Fritz


#5

Well, I can’t really help you with that specifically, but try asking other players to see what they do when facing Takuma with any of your characters. = \

A very helpful thing to do at times is to switch characters with a friend. You pick a a character/team for him, and he does the same for you. You can see things from another perspective, and can see what your friend does that works, what other things you can do with your character, what you find is hard to react or block against, etc., and use it in your own game. It can make a HUGE difference.

So if you can do that, put him against Takuma and see how he handles it.


#6

That gets more into strategy, but when I need to learn a new matchup, I play anyone and everyone who plays that character, and keep playing until I feel confident in the match. One thing I’ve found is certain difficult matches can become a lot easier when you approach the matchup differently. If you always rush down, try to turtle instead, or vice versa. Of course strategy threads are a wonderful resource.


#7

Sometimes also learning that character that gives you trouble can help. It can more easily let you understand what that characters likes to do, why he likes to do it, and what situations give him trouble.


#8

BINGO!!! That right there is the best way to defeat a opponents character. If Takuma is giving you trouble, start using him yourself. Learn how he plays and what the character is capable of. You’ll learn its weaknesses and strenghts. Helping you on your road to victory.


#9

how to learn hit confirming:

cvs2 training mode, k-cammy vs anything. set enemy to random guard.

do standing close fierce. if you see it hit, link into QCFx2+K super. if it’s blocked, do nothing.

do this several hundreds of times (i’m not even fucking joking) and you should eventually be able to see it almost 100% of the time. move on to FAR fierce, see it hit, link into super. the timing is a little tighter. once you get that 100% of the time, you should be able to do things like sf3:3s ken d.MP -> shippu or chun-li d.MK -> houyokusen.

also learn to do hit confirms off multiple hits. random guard while playing ken, try to do c.LK x2 into super. if the bot blocks it, do nothing. if the bot gets hit, cancel into shoryureppa.

muscle memory is key, and so is training your reflexes to see things like this.