Teaching this game to Noobs


#1

What’s a good way to teach this game to noobs?

Should I try to teach them special moves first, or maybe poking. This game didn’t take me that long to learn, but I already knew the special move motions from other fighting games. I just had to learn combos and poking. But where should I start for a complete noob.

Plz help


#2

In this order…

Normals
Footsies
Timing
Spacing

NO ROLLING

then the advanced stuff


#3

play super turbo first.


#4

That’s good advice. But the thing is, CVS2 is more upclose and footsie oriented, and ST is more Fireball.


#5

1st - Normals:
Ranges, timing, whiff countering.

2nd - Specials:
Speed of fireball, numbers of hits for stuff, etc.

3rd - Footsies:
Once you learn timing and range, you can learn mixup footsies pretty easily. This includes baiting, counter hit combos, etc.

4th - Basic Combos.

5th - Other stuff:
Throw setups, crossup setups, reverse anti air, etc.

And yeah, ST helps.


#6

Woah I don’t even know some of that stuff lol.

Looks like I got a lot to learn.


#7

1st I’d anti-air them every chance you get to teach them that jumping=bad. Just try to punish their mistakes, and then tell them why they lost.


#8

uh, you have to learn footsies in ST to avoid getting killed by fireballs…

cvs2 footsies are pretty stupid because roll reduces the amont of safe pokes to max range c.fp and s.lk and that’s about it.

st footsies are more closely related to the fireball game because you can’t just roll through whiffed pokes or fireballs. if you whiff a poke you can very easily eat a fireball in the face.


#9

For a “Complete Noob”

IMO,

Start with teaching them how to do specials. The games almost pointless if they can’t do the basic moves (fireballs, dp, hurricanes, etc). I know shotos are tired and old, but they are solid, and are great first characters. If they eventually learn to do the specials for Ryu, Guile, Chun & Geif, they will be able to play “Any character”.

Anyway, let’s just assume they’ve learned the speacials. For the next step, I would then introduce them to simple basic combos (2-in-ones).

IMO, strategy, zoning etc. etc. are all ongoing facets of the game that are just learned with experience and a little advice here and there.

I’m actually in the process of teaching my daughter, (7 years old). She’s at the point where she’s getting comfortable with fireballs, throws & blocking. I’m hoping by the end of this summer she’ll be able to do a DP or two…

Fighting games are arguably the hardest games to learn. The learning curve is pretty steep. I know it took me atleast a month to do a Dp half-way consistently. The one thing I wouldn’t do, is to beat them down mercilessly, (unless they specifically said so). You could easily turn them away from the game by doing this. I did this to my brother, he was actually getting pretty decent, but I starting giving him beatdowns, and he totally stopped playing… That was probably 10 years ago. A lot of players can NOT handle repeated harsh beatdowns. Some can (and appreciate it), but most can’t. Streetfighter games in particular, can make the recipient of such beatdowns, feel extremely hopeless…


#10

the thing is, even though most of us probably learned by learning the specials first, i’m willing to bet that a newbie would get better even faster if they learned the basics involved with poking, footsies, and the fireball game instead of just randomly learning how to do special moves.

instead of just giving someone a movelist and just teaching them to go wild, start by walking up and sweeping them. teach them to block.

when they start blocking, start throwing them. teach them to throw/tech.

then teach them to hit you with a fireball before you get within sweep range. once they get that down, jump over the fireball and hit them. teach them to dp.

this is a little more applied than just showing them how to do specials.


#11

what doess whiffs and dp mean?


#12

Whiff: An attack that doesn’t connect with the opponent.

DP: Dragon punch.


#13

oooh, i always called it a shoryuken though =/ but thanks


#14

Special moves

this is a little more applied than just showing them how to do specials.

I agree with you Pat, and one of my friends says that CvS 2 is too fast for him…he likes SSF2/SF2 Turbo. So I think if I tried to teach him CvS 2 your way, he wouldn’t think it’s as fast because he’s not trying to input special moves, he’s just trying to input a punch/kick button (and a direction) at most.

Also, because most special moves are used at the end of combos, maybe it would make more sense to teach them special moves with the PURPOSE of comboing…as in, tell them when to use this special move (during which combo), as opposed to the way I learned it:
“here’s a psycho crusher. It can fly across the screen. Have fun.”


#15

What is footsie?


#16

what the hell, all this shit everyone is saying is way too advance for a newbie. seriously,

  1. your newbie needs to be driven to get better. a way is to frustrate the bastard with 20-0 win record or if thats too much. he needs a rival to take down.
  2. he’ll learn on his own what works and what doesn’t work in order to win.

#17

what the hell, all this shit everyone is saying is way too advance for a newbie
We’re not going to say to the newbie: “Ok, here, do a crossup jump in, do two lp links and buffer that into a lvl 2 super cancel”…we’re going to at most teach him what a jump in is first, etc…we’re discussing HOW to teach, not doing the teaching itself.

1. your newbie needs to be driven to get better. a way is to frustrate the bastard with 20-0 win record or if thats too much. he needs a rival to take down.
Your friends must be very thickskinned, cause if I did that to any of my friends they’d just walk off and never pick up the game again.

2. he’ll learn on his own what works and what doesn’t work in order to win.
I don’t know any sort of teaching method nowadays where the teacher is not actively helping the student, which is what you’re proposing. I just don’ think it would work, sure they’d get to a level of play where they can do the special moves or whatever, but they’ll just have to unlearn the scrubby things they learned in order to pass the hurdle of scrub (I know, I’m trying to pass that hurdle right now). I say better to teach a person well so they don’t have to become a scrub in the first place.