The Fighting Game Community


#1

[LEFT]Hello! This is my first post on the forums; however, I’ve been a long time viewer and reader of this site.[/LEFT]
[LEFT]So what I wanted to discuss is: Why is the fighting game scene not up to the level of SC2 (Starcraft2)? Why are the prize rewards so low?[/LEFT]
[LEFT]Now, since we know those two facts (a: the fgc can’t compete with SC2 at this moment and b: the prize moneys can’t compete with esports’), the real question comes into place: What is necessary to be done raise the fgc to the next “level.”[/LEFT]
[LEFT]Edit: I edited it in order to make it more discuss worthy.[/LEFT]


#2

Well SC2 scene is single game right? FG scene is not just one game, but collection of them, I would expect single game to have its scene well organize compare to bunch.


#3

hey bro, i know its your first post and all, but this thread topic is pretty bad. you should read this: http://shoryuken.com/2011/08/11/editorial-are-fighting-games-the-next-esport/

and forgive if i’m wrong, but your tone and what you’re saying gives the impression that you don’t actually go to events. if you actually attend fighting game events, you would find the answers to your own questions.


#4

because PC came with internet and BATTLE.NET is awesome and free…
you had to drive to Arcades for good competitions and competitors… and this gen was like the first for a good netcode, not sure if CvS2 was good…

Plus you most of the time you need to invest 150+ for a controller you can play comfortably on…


#5

That’s a very good read. Thank you for that.
The reason I am in the US is for the soul reason of attending Evo. So of course I forgive about that. However I don’t forgive you for not explaining yourself on how this topic is a bad one.
By putting out that link however, it suggests that you believe the fgc should continue as it is: a measure of self entertainment and pride + creating bonds between players. I respect that and that’s how it should be in an ideal world. However, with the time and effort pro gamers put into it, I can see no reason why the fgc can’t evolve to the next step~ what SC2 has become. I don’t care whether you call it an esport or w/e.
edit: I love the fgc and how it is now. I just want it to go to the next level.
edit2: This is a response to ultradavid. Sorry if it led to a bit of confusion.


#6

The day SF/FGs become an eSport, it will be a very sad day.

I guess it kinda has already, since T6 is in WCG, but still… I hope the rest of current FGs do not follow the eSports trend.


#7

Okay this may sound harsh, but in my honest opinion, by saying that, you disregard the actions of the 40 people who began evo in 1995.
If the fgc becomes an eSport (or w/e you wanna call it) it would definetly expand the community. Why would you not want that?


#8

depends of what you define as community, the people who organize tournaments and the people who participates on them?
or the stream monsters?
the fear that some people have about FG’s becoming a “e-sport” is that the major part of the influx on the community wouldnt be players, only stream monsters and scrubs that barely play the games, but for some weird reason feel that they have an educated opinion to talk about them (high level play, balance, matchups, strategies), since 2009 we have seen some of that, no many liked what they saw


#9

why won’t the word eSports die already? It’s just competitive gaming, stop trying to dress it up and make it look like it’s something else. I’m still not sure what e in eSports stands for.

Like UltraDavid said, poker didn’t need to make up a new name for people to notice it and enjoy watching. Why should competitive gaming need to?


#10

Do you know what the E in Email stands for?


#11

The FGC is beginning to be able to stand on its own two legs in terms of competition and exposure, No need to compare it to anything else.


#12

so what e sports is still a gay term


#13

Lets not derail threads to talk about the ‘eSports’ term. It’s going to take a while for people to update their vocabulary, and until then they are going to use the terms they are comfortable with. Be patient.


Now about the ‘level’ of the scene:

The Starcraft scene technically started in 94 with Warcraft, but kept the same platform (Online play on PC) and the same types of players from 94 to 2011.

Fighting games started earlier (SF2 in 91) but in arcades, the arcade/console transition really gained momentum in 02-03, but did not have a dominant game developed for the platform until SF4 in 2009.

While the franchises have a lot of history, the scene basically rebooted in 09, what you see right now is more like the ‘warcraft’ than the ‘starcraft’. We can’t ‘fix’ warcraft to become starcraft, we just keep working on it, evaluating it, and improving what we can.


#14

its fine how it is. why do people want everything to be bigger when it doesnt affect them?


#15

It’s always good to question things, and that’s why I want to thank you for this post.
Why would we want the fgc to expand?
The bigger the community is:
A) the larger the player base of people would be which= more people to play fighting games with.
B) the higher the expectations of the quality of games= more pressure on fighting game companies to make good games.
C) the more tournaments all around the world will begin= more opportunities for players to both participate and spectate.
If you have anything to add, please feel free to do so.


#16

I saw someone say “entertainment sports” in the past so I wasn’t sure if it meant electronic or entertainment.


#17

i guess my point is that we’re not doing what starcraft is doing because the FGC is not starcraft. the vast vast majority of players in the scene aren’t playing for the purpose of making money to live off of, and no one is doing this as a career. even top players have regular 9-5 day jobs. by striving to be like SC2, with pro leagues and huge payouts, we would be missing the point of what’s really awesome about fighting games. yeah evo is huge now, but the local scenes and weekly tournaments that make up the vast majority of the experience of community members doesn’t happen because of huge payouts.

and i’m all for expanding the community, but trying to be like starcraft is not the correct way to do it.

and also, please note that I am NOT Ultradavid, my gamertag just happens to be very similar to his lol (with his permission, of course)


#18

You really think people are playing SC2 for the money? Similarly to FG’s, only the very best of the best make semi-decent cash off of it. Difference is that amount’s bigger than FG tourneys. Those that are pretty good get sponsorships (basically free computers, keyboards etc. stuff they need) but still need to work real jobs/school (RTS in general has mostly younger players… conception has been that once you pass 25 you’re pretty much done).

It’s really easy to get into SC2, you just start playing ranked matches (which actually match you correctly unlike certain mainstream FG’s), you improve, maybe 6 months in you start entering small-scale online tourneys (something that FG’s don’t have) you do okay, then a year or more in you start going to majors (obviously you can do tourneys ahead of time just you won’t place well). Not sure how I ended making my point this but it’s that it’s way easier to get into RTS and get competitive, even though top level RTS probably has a higher skill ceiling than FG’s (for which I’ll likely get flamed here but seriously, where in AE top-level is all about mind games top-level BW/SC2 (especially BW) still has a level of who does mechanics best in addition to the same mind games).


#19

@belegorm, i realize that the vast majority of players are not playing SC2 for money. however, the top players in SC2 are. there are professional, SALARIED leagues for SC2. on the other hand, for the FGC, currently not even top players can make a consistent living off of tournament wins. that’s the difference i was trying to point out in regards to money.


#20

i think it’s good that top players arent inaccessible and untouchable like in esports. you want to play justin wong, go to a tournament where justin wong is. that’s a big plus of the scene not getting too big.