The number direction thread


#1

Many of the new people seem to have a problem understanding the number system. Here is a quick guide along with some other helpful notations. If any of these are wrong or I missed some good ones, then let me know and I’ll add/edit it.

A quick key: It is just like a num pad:

1 = :db:
2 = :d:
3 = :df:
4 = :l:
5 = neutral (no direction)
6 = :r:
7 = :ub:
8 = :u:
9 = :uf:

or

:ub: :u: :uf:
:l: N :r:
:db: :d: :df:

789
456
123

236 = :qcf:
623 = :dp:
214 = :qcb:
41236 = :hcf:

[] = brackets usually mean repeat the section, but when it is used around one button then it can mean hold.
][ = in the case of a held button, reverse brackets mean to release.
~ = tilde means to press immediately after. Almost like sliding between the two buttons.
XX = this denotes a link. The moves before and after the XX will not cancel into eachother, but can still combo.
, = seperates attacks/movements. Is usually a chain or cancel.
j. = jump
dj. = double jump
IAD = Instant Air Dash
OTG = On the ground hit
BBQ = Baroque


Zangief Q&A Thread
#2

, = The move before it chaining into the move after it? (Never really game it much thought but I’m pretty sure that’s what it’s there for)


#3

why not just use the directions.


#4

^We’re still going to have to use all the punctuation so it’ll look crowded with the smilys
The numbers take less then a minute to learn
People are used to the numbers
It’s easier to copy and paste the numbers to spread the knowledge


#5

Numbers are simple to learn, easy to use, and take up less space.

Seriously, it’s not that hard. Pick this up, and it’ll come to you as naturally as directions.


#6

No it’s not simple to learn at least for this guy who is adamant at trying to change the way the community does thing’s for some reason.


#7

I just don’t understand why this has to be used when we have symbol graphics already programmed into the forum. Like the arrows :d: , and button graphics like :snkb: :snkc: etc

I understand that the numbers are good for text-based movelists, but when you have access to easy to read graphics why not use those?


#8

Makes it easier to copy/paste for one.

Really, it’s just the standard the community adopted when the Japanese version was released. It works, and there’s no reason to change it now.


#9

When did the fighting game community as a whole become to cool for “Gamepro” style notation? I dont feel like looking at numbers all day when I wanna learn a fighting game, shit just fucks with my ability to comprehend whatever the fuck I am reading and attempting to learn.


#10

Possibly when people figured fighting game players may be able to memorise shorthand for the 9 states on which a stick can be at any given time…

Although “as a whole” is actualy mainly “those who play airdashers”, you look in the SF sections and it’s still qcfs and stuff.


#11

I’ve never played a capcom game where people used 236 notation instead of QCF notation. I like street-fighter style better.


#12

Number notation should not be the only way one can view fighting game information. That was my main point.


#13

I understand it for Soul Calibur. Move inputs for that game are generally simpler and focus on directionals + attack. I still don’t like number notation for Capcom fighters.

Actually, the A/B/C thing for TvC I don’t understand either. Or did this originate from the arcade version/cabinet? I thought the game notated them as L/M/H (light/medium/hard)

I think a lot of the resistance for the number system is due to the fact that it just isn’t used for Capcom fighters, typically. I don’t remember it ever being used in CvS2, 3s, MvC2, SF4 etc discussions. It’s a little weird that people are adopting it for TvC all of a sudden. Is it because of the increase of directional normals?


#14

Well let’s see is this game anything like Cvs2, SF3, SF4, no it isn’t, it is like GG, BB, AH, HnK to name a few what do all those games use for notations?


#15

I don’t get what’s so hard - even if you don’t know it by heart, just look down at the keyboard for a sec. It’s also pretty standard for a lot, a lot of fighting games that is not SF.

If you can’t comprehend the numbers and ABCD for buttons, maybe you shouldn’t try to learn combos in the first place…

Besides, using the graphics are annoying. More inputs to write them, and personally I think it gets kinda messy and hard to read quickly compared to text notations.


#16

Lets be realistic this shit is more like MvC2 than anything and they don’t use the stupid numbers because their just that stupid. Like I said it was call when this game was in Japan/arcade only but now this shit is on a wii console a lot of people won’t even want to bother with the numbers.


#17

“They don’t use stupid numbers because their just that stupid”

It’s not even worth arguing with fools like this…


#18

Learn it and deal with it. There’s nothing complicated about. Ridiculously simple.

It’s the standard for the community.


#19

Number notation translates easily between all languages. This way, someone that doesn’t know English well can still easily read the combos

Why do we use numbers over arrows in this section? Because it is standard for the community…why should one group try to be different just because they are unwilling to learn/stubborn? In case you want to share the combos, the arrows do not copy. Also, it is easier/quicker for me to type the numbers than the commands for the arrows.

Now…this thread was made to help people. Either contribute or ignore it.


#20

I hate number notation. Using the standard SF abbreviations works better for me.

dp+C is easier than 623+C, for example. Also, qcf+c is no more or less difficult than 236+c. Besides, SF notation makes sense regardless of the direction the character is facing, i.e. 623 is not a dp if the character is facing left.

I never use a keypad so these numbers require more effort on my part in translating. Numbers belong in math not my fighting games.