Thought crimes. It was only a matter of time


#1

So the govt. is stepping in to fight against piracy. I can understand fighting against piracy, but shit like this:

And this:

So basically, if you develop any software with the potential to facilitate/provide a means to piracy, you can get charged for it. Depending on how vague this bill is, wouldn’t that apply to search engines, social networking sites, email, online storage, etc.?

Anyway, this is complete bullshit. They can arrest “people who think might be about to infringe with a civil offense” for nothing more than typing something in a search engine. Give me a fucking break.

Source: http://www.dailytech.com/article.aspx?newsid=18815

I guess this is part 2 of my “This lobbying bs has got to stop” thread. Fuck the RIAA and MPAA.


#2

holy shit…

that’s fucked up…


#3

In before malware gets released that enters such search terms without the user knowing it.

In before the government doesn’t even need to think you did something and can take you to jail anyways, oh wait…

So… what’s a good country to move to that the US doesn’t plan to enforce its democracy upon?


#4

“hate crime” laws are essentially thought crime so this would actually be at least the 2nd “thought crime” on the books.


#5

Is sweden a good place to run to?


#6

I wasn’t being serious.

Although Obama is an idiot, actually, I think he’s smart and lies on purpose: massive bail outs to corporations that deserved to fail and let the good corporations take their place, lying about ending the war, ignorance and negligence regarding the oil leak, etc, etc.

I’m an American all day every day but I have no problem saying that our president is fucking up and needs to get his shit together. His “solutions” cause more problems than the problems he tries to solve.


#7

Funny, I always considered them no different than laws against domestic terror. You are not only punishing the criminal for the act against the victim but also for using the act to send a message to an entire group of people.

The reason that someone carries out an act as to be important if it can effect sentencing even in non-hate crime situations. I often hear the same people against hate crimes upset that the Government wishes to put terrorists in the same courts and prisions as other murderers. The only thing seperating the two are the reasons that they carried out the crime.


#8

So are you saying thought crimes are ok to enforce?


#9

Are you sure those people aren’t making an argument that non american citizens don’t have the same judicial rights us citizens have or are you specifically talking about domestic terrorists? I’ve never heard that argument made for domestic terrorists.


#10

I think that I misused the term domestic terrorists.

I do stand by what I said because not being a citizen does not keep you from being convicted in US courts. I doubt that the druglord from Kingston that they just caught and is facing charges in New York will be convicted in a manner different from any other American druglord.


#11

I am against calling hate crimes thought crimes. They are a form of Terror. A person stating that they do not like somthing about you and makeing a statement through your victimization.


#12

domestic terror laws are closer to treason than to hate crime laws imo. and if we live in a free society it’s pretty hypocritical to tack on additional years to someone’s sentence bcuz of what they believe, it also creates a sense that some victims are better than others.


#13

Maybe, but the argument that a non us citizen isn’t entitled to a trial in us courts is not an analogous argument to the one people typically make against hate crime laws.


#14

As opposed to when someone murders a person they like?


#15

lol that’s pretty much what i’m saying. the idea that murdering someone bcuz they’re gay, black, latin or whatever is somehow worse than murdering someone bcuz you wanted to take their money or they cut you off in traffic is ridiculous.


#16

motive does come into the courts tho. like if you kill a guy in a red hot rage as opposed to grabbing a random person from the street and skinning them for pleasure.


#17

No but both terrorists who kill Americans for being Americans and people who kill others based on their race are comittiting murder. I can see the treason argument as well but once again, you have murder being treated differently based on the motive.

as for the trials in US courts, the argument that I always heard was the one that terrorists were not just common criminals and the Tribunals were better suited for them since a lot of the evidence presented by the Military would not have been admisible under normal circumstances.


#18

Well, as much as I’d like to say, “this sucks”, I won’t. Why? Because they are fools to think they can simple put the lid on something like this.

The best they can do is slap a band-aid on it and wait for it to wear off before slapping another one on.

Basically, they can do whatever they want to torrents and such. People will find ways around it (like they always have) and find different means of not getting caught. Just because you change the lock doesn’t mean someone can’t get in again :stuck_out_tongue:


#19

On the actual subject, It will not survive the first court case. It would be like arresting a 15 year old for opening a store refrigerator that had beer in it. Nothing happened yet.

I am sure that this is like the vise scene in Casino where the director put it in to take the censors minds off of the other fucked up shit in the movie. He expected it to be seriously edited, but it also gave him leverage where he wanted it.


#20

I think you’re kind of missing the point. This law will lead to innocent people getting punished and not only that but can be abused by corrupt authority.