Tips to improve clutch?


#1

Many people will say that training mode is the sacred water that will purge any avid player of any impurities. There is one thing, however, I find that no amount of training mode solves and that’s clutch. I often find myself muscle-memorizing even the most complex of combos, mixups, and resets, yet it all goes to the wind once the heat of a match gets underway. It can be disheartening seeing as being unable to perform something that is religiously practiced when needed the most. I’m sure that I’m not the only one with this issue.

Anybody at all: What are some ways to improve a players clutch performance?


#2

If you keep choking it becomes more than just a mental issue, it probably means that you are going for fancy stuff that’s more risky than they should be. You need to rethink what you are doing, start thinking less about styling and more about what that works.


#3

Just play more.


#4

I was just gonna reply “experience”, but piskooooo pretty much beat me to it.
Being clutch isn’t something you can learn, it’s just something that comes from playing a lot and knowing your team and it’s limits well.


#5

Think of it like this, if your choke in tournaments, play in more till your comfortable in that enviornment.
If your chocking while playing with your friends in casuals, play them more.
Training mode is important, but the best practice i think is casual with someone good, it really lets you know what’s practical fast.


#6

After performing all of your muscle-memorized combos, have you tried turning the training dummy on computer? I find that I can’t learn something in training and go right into battle with what I’ve learned unless I immediately go into battle with the mindset of wanting to do that combo/mixup whatever in an actual fight. If I can do it against the computer with a few worries about losing, then I’ll turn the damage on and go there. If I’m successful, then I’ll move to a real match and there I usually find myself successful there as well. Think of it as taking steps towards your comfort zone.

And I agree with what other people said, just play more. You don’t want to find yourself in a mirror match getting fucked up by your own shit that you’re too choked up to do, but even that can help aid your focus.


#7

I play every round like it’s clutch. I play every situation like it’s clutch. If T. Hawk taught me anything, it’s freaking clutch lol. I need patience w/ Hawk at all times normally anyway, so when it comes down to a few pixels, while my heart rate goes up, I’m still remaining cool. The thing to remember is, the person on the other end is going to do the most simple and effective thing to kill you. Close range pokes, fireballs, uppercuts, walking up to you and throwing you (which is embarrassing).

Any kind of combo kind of goes out the window because it’s most likely too risky for them to try, so turtle up and don’t be ashamed to play lame as hell. You trying to stay alive and win, any kind of respect toward that other guy needs to go out the window right now – doing any kind of stupid ass shit to style om 'em is just that – stupid. Trust me, I had to learn that the hard way. Trying to finish off with an ultra or super just to say the final “F— You” when a poke would do the trick is not smart at all because your opponent is expecting that final ultra or super and will anticipate accordingly (if they mess up and you can land an ultra, then by all means, go for it, but don’t TRY to set up your ultra)

Watch your positioning though, and that’s just something you have to learn from the specific match up you’re playing over time.

I know sometimes you can just be mentally off and there is not much you can do about it, but I find it helpful to play music in the background, have a beverage near by, and never play while hungry or if you need to use the bathroom soon lol.


#8

What works for me is to work on harder variants of BnB. Using (non otg/wallbounce) assists to get a couple more hits, using different versions of specials that require you to dash, things like that. You probably wouldn’t ever use these, but if you work on them, the original BnB will become ‘the easy version’.


#9

Clutch performance?

Are you down to the last man?

Don’t try so hard. Stay calm. Activate xfactor properly if available. Stick to combos that work on everyone as opposed to high risk combos prone to dropping

Pay attention to time on the clock. But don’t let itake you panic.

Are you winning and looking to close the show?

Pay attention to who’s left on the opposing side.

Got a favorable matchup? Tag’em in.

Weigh in the X-factor. Do you have various ways to deal chip? Use it. Forcing the opponent to pop x-factor on your terms is far better then their terms.

Time left? How big is your life lead?

It’s moreso IMO about calmly weighing the options and situations as well as executing instead of a talent or skill you develop.


#10

The biggest advice I can give is to keep it simple with combos. I never try to do elaborate combos to end a match. Do not try and be desperate either with random supers or chip. This its the mistake I usually make. Maybe its matchup specific too. I don’t know why, but level 3 x-factor Sentinel was my biggest weakness in vanilla. Practice might solve specific matchup issues, but keeping it simple is the most important thing.


#11

Get a Wong Factor t-shirt. That shirt enhances your clutch performance by 3827%.

Scientifically proven people.


#12

IMO the main thing to remember is to play to win, rather than play to not lose. If you’re walking a tight rope, you’re more likely to get across looking straight ahead rather than down, know what I mean? In a clutch situation, make a quick plan on exactly what you have to do to win and stick to it as much as you can.


#13

I’ve been on the receiving end of clutch situations so many times. Doesn’t really happen when my opponent is being to aggressive. I just get out played by smarts/experience.

And X-factor lol


#14

yea, i have the same problem. know a combo by heart but when it comes time for you to really pull off this combo or setup you bite it and drop the combo. happens to all of us. but i think what is causing this and correct me if im wrong, but drilling combos and running mixup game in practice mode may be your problem. you get comfortable, because you know, whether you drop the combo or not, you can just start it up again. your pretty much in pilot mode. then when you go into a match your doing combos without thinking. so if you drop it, what next?? find a reset, keep pressure, keep your the momentum and options going. experience is key to pulling out a clutch win, but more importantly you need to have control. knowing your next move before you do it. if you can read your opponent like a book, counter them ASAP! but clutch is not solely relying on reaction to the opponents offense, rather taking one mistake they made and turning it in your favor! take the momentum with you and mind-fuck the SHEET out of them!


#15

my 2 sense … make sure your Defense is ON POINT … so that you can land a hit when it counts not just try to land a hit randomly but with a good Defense you will find that opening and turn things in your favor.


#16

One word, experience.


#17

When you’re in a tight spot, don’t change your style up at all. That’s when you get sloppy. Don’t mindlessly rush in of course, but it’s not like you should be doing that anyway.


#18

I don’t know much about this game, but I’ve played other games competitively. My advice is just to focus purely on game states and what you should do. If you’re stuck thinking “holy shit, how am I going to beat J Wong?”, you’re setting yourself up for failure. However, if you focus on specific strategies like “I’ll stay out of charging star range, call an assist, then mix him up”, then you can focus and actually play your game. No player can do anything outside of their characters’ limits, no matter how good they are, so just focus on how to take advantage of their limitations I guess.


#19

One other thing I remembered: Try to perform each BnB you’re working on 5 times in a row in training with your eyes closed. It’s actually pretty hard, and perhaps nearly impossible for some combos, but for me its like memorizing the combo twice.