Training advice for non-online player


#1

I don’t want to spend all my time in practice mode, I want real match experience. There are a few issues in my way though.

  1. My friends don’t play Street Fighter.
  2. The closest local players are over 3 hours away from my place, so going there would be too expensive for me as of now (if I can afford it, I want to go there in March. Depends on financial situation).
  3. My internet connection isn’t good enough for online matches. Upload is usually around 800 kbps. Even on green bars I get quite a bit of lag (I don’t mind the delay too much).

I’m not sure how I’m supposed to improve if I can’t test out my techniques. I kinda doubt that just playing against the AI will help me improve (outside of reacting to jump-ins and such).
I could see it working in the beginning, but I assume I’d hit a ceiling where the AI just can’t provide any help anymore.

Advice appreciated


#2

Well if you have friends close by that is going to be your only option or find people who aren’t your friends close by. Also I recommend strongly that you use practice mode. It is really useful. What city do you live in? We have had people ask this kind of question before when they are from some place in California or NYC before. You might have people closer then you expect.


#3

I do use practice mode and its features :slight_smile: don’t you worry about that.
I live in Bad Windsheim, Bavaria, Germany (pretty small town).
I already checked the German FGC site to look for players in my area and the closest ones are in Munich, which would be a bit over 2 hours by car…but I don’t own a car, so it would take ~3:30 by train.
I ‘can’ play online, but it’s hard to handle. The difference in frame rate throws off my own and my oponent’s timing. I’d rather not make other players suffer from my internet.


#4

How do you get crap internet in Germany?
You hooked on wifi?
Cause even the low end internet service packages from the ghetto companies got decent ping and speed.

Even 6mb down/1mb up should be plenty for online games.

If you got the game on Steam, you can add me and we play some.

I’m a shit player but often up for some games.


#5

I know the feeling. The few times I have played offline, I’ve had to drive a total of 4 hours. It sucks, but it’s all I got.

If you have it on Xbox, PM me. I’ve played many people in Europe and the lag wasn’t too bad on my end.


#6

Shit internet is pretty common from what I can tell. Also my family is using the internet a lot.
I have ethernet connected to my PC, but it’s still pretty bad. When I stream other games, I can usually only use a bitrate of 600 kbps to not drop frames. It’s really annoying.
I sadly can’t upgrade my speed either, since that would require completely new internet cables and that’s really expensive.
(And because, for some stupid reason, my ISP won’t let me have like 7down/7up. I so rarely download stuff, I’d love to just switch around my internet speed).


#7

I own it on Steam, sorry. But thanks for the offer.


#8

You won’t get better without some sort of comp whether offline or online. You can practice execution, set ups, and stuff like that, but without opponents you will only get so far.


#9

Hm, best thing I can recommend is sometimes in big cities like Munich you get a group of fighting gamers that sometimes have a live in situation. Like a group of guys have a place and they all play fighting games together. Might be able to do a weekend of it when you are free and crash with some people to make it cheap. That way you aren’t spending 7 hours on a rail over one day which cuts into being able to play, plus don’t want to leave to early in the night. Do something like 1 way trip on Saturday morning then comeback Sunday evening. Need to make sure they are cool with you crashing, but when I used to travel to play better players my crew of like 3 guys would do that once a month. If the rail isn’t super expensive and you can spare the money for a couple meals out I’d recommend it. Personally doing stuff like that and meeting people was what cemented me loving fighting games.

Also I know RyanHeart who is a top player recently moved to Germany. Not sure where though but you have a mad solid player to learn from if you can find out and play with him.


#10

Alright, I contacted RyanHart. We’ll see what comes out of that.
Money is super tight beginning of next year, but I’ll see if I can afford going to Munich a few times at least.
The guys in Munich said that they have some events planned, but not finalized yet. I hope there are some multi-day events in there. Would make planing for me a lot easier.


#11

Alright, seems like I figured out my issue with online matches.
Looks like the graphics settings were too high for my GPU to process online matches properly, so it caused lag.
I did a few matches yesterday and today, and all besides 1 worked really well.

Losing 38 out of the 40 matches is a different story though :3
I lost so many matches that I should have had in the bag. I guess that’s what they call tournament nerves, huh?


#12

Oh yeah if you play on PC there can be some issues. If you have the game from steam you can put on an fps display. Lower the setting so stuff is always at 60 fps. Fighting games literally require 60fps to run correctly since they can’t use interpolation. Some stage’s might make it more difficult so use training stage if you need too.


#13

Well, during the test, that the game requires you to take in order to go online, my rig always passed with an A rating at 80FPS on average.
I lowered the filter and anti-aliasing settings and all over sudden stuff works.
Not sure what’s up with that, but I’ll get a way better GPU next week anyways :stuck_out_tongue:

I’m just glad that I can get bodied by actual people instead of the AI now.
And yes, fluid FPS is needed, I agree.
As someone with a background in speedrunning, I know very well how a change in FPS can screw over accuracy.