UD-CPS2: Fully Consolized Capcom Play System 2


#501

Almost done with another batch of systems. It’s amazing the little details you forget after only a few months of not building something!
-ud


#502

I think I may be purchasing one very soon


#503

PM-ed ! Fr FGC would love one !


#504

Also PMed! UK needs more of these :smiley:


#505

I finally got my UD CPS2!! It is awesome and I love it! This whole experience was great. UD was very communicative and attentive to many details. Thank you UD!!! This will most definitely get plenty of use.


#506

Got mine last week. This is some good stuff and better than lugging my supergun setup to friends places. Being able to plug in any stick does wonders. Also seconding the good communication from emails to ship. He also forwarded some extra links for video info when I had questions. Thank you, good sir!


#507

What are the true differences between playing on a CPS2 board and just playing an emulated cps2 game over MAME or on GGPO?


#508

Reduced input lag, proper speed settings, no differences in game data. That’s the main stuff. Tourney competitors prefer arcade hardware.


#509

PM sent


#510

Hate these things. Capcom security pins were used in both CPS2 motherboards and games early on. They later stopped using them (realized what a pain they were for legit maintenance?).

But they are no match for drill.
-ud


#511

My first CPS2 B-board (Blue SSF2) that I got in November 2013 had one of those. Pain in the ass to get rid of if you don’t drill it. I used two sets of needle-nose pliers, grabbed both sides and twisted in opposite directions. Fortunately, the metal used for those bolts is incredibly soft, and tear apart quite easily.

On a side note, the SSF2 I mentioned above, after cracking it open, was running of a Maxell battery (standard issue for Capcom at the time).
Considering SSF2 was originally released in 1993, and Super Turbo came out in 1994 (after which I presume Capcom had stopped issuing SSF2), does that mean my SSF2 was still running off that battery for TWENTY years?


#512

Good question. I don’t know if Capcom ever re-install security pins when people sent them B boards for battery swap. If so, that would bump the last battery swap date.
-ud


#513

So what the security pins do?
Just keep people out?
Or do they serve a function, like holding the case together?


#514

They don’t really hold the case together, because they’re relative loose and spin around, but some have had just screw-bolts there, and they can serve that purpose if you want.
They’re definitely there just to keep people from tampering with the innards; since there’s no way to take them off without destroying them, and Capcom was the only ones to have the security bolts with the Capcom “C” icon on them, they’d be able to differentiate the tampered ones from the clean ones…


#515

I think it’s just a fancy, metal “warranty voided” sticker. :wink:


#516

Ironically, they actually place a warranty sticker over the security pin O_o
-ud


#517

So it’s a warranty sticker on top of a warranty security pin. Seems like overkill, but understandable given how Capcom was REALLY anti-piracy in the CPS-1 days.

How were you even supposed to originally remove the security pin anyways? Special socket tool? Plastic clip remover? Capcom-approved drill?


#518

Got to play check out a UD cps2 this weekend at final round. Awesome device.


#519

Nice! I’m glad to see more people are getting their hands on it. I didn’t even hear there was one there. I thought everyone was just playing ST on the cabs. How many setups did you guys use? Was it used for tourneys too?


#520

The head of the security pin is recessed into the plastic casing, so there’s not much room for a tool, but it’s possible they had something custom. I’m considering modifying some pliers to see if I can come up with a reliable non-drill solution. The key is not damaging the plastic, so your options are limited.
-ud