Virtua Fighter & ST


#1

So, I’ve heard people say that VF was the closest you could get with a modern fighter to the overall *feel *of ST. I’m just wondering why that’s the case, exactly?


#2

It is beautifully crafted and can be viewed as art, just like ST. Maybe the only difference is that in VF there is no such thing as counter picking.


#3

I believe 3D fighters are very different from 2D ones, specially SF2 - the original 2D fighter series. For instance, you will not likely see someone desperately trying to retreat due to facing a grappler, or a complete keep away character, or a zoner. The way close combat, wake-up games and hit detection work is different. You will find great 2D games, such as ST, and great 3D games, such as some VF versions. That’s all, IMO.


#4

Fair enough. Let me give an example of what I’m talking about, though:

“VF5: A very fun game that captures a lot of what I love about the best ST fights. You can play your own style, you can win with your own character, there are a lot of decisions to make. Plus the graphics are beautiful! I can’t wait for VF5:FS to come out this summer and I hope it will be there at Evo! VF5 is the only video game, like ST, where I can play all day, non stop, and not get tired of it.” Taken from Zass’ interview (http://www.strevival.com/interviews/zass/)

The thing is, a lot of people have told me similar things recently – I’m just curious to see everyone’s opinion.


#5

I played some VF when I was a kid, but never on a competitive tournament level. I’d like to pick it up again. This is just my opinion, from a guy who hasn’t really played VF5 (for whatever it is worth).

What attracts me to the game is a sort of complexity through simple means. There are only three buttons (half of the six you use for ST): kick, punch, guard. The timer is 45 seconds (comparable to the about 52 seconds on the ST timer). And zass is probably right about playstyle and decisions. I’m judging a lot of what I’m saying on what I saw in the VF5 exhibition match between Chibita and Fuudo. It’s similar to ST in the sense that a good player can probably hand your ass to you if you fuck up in a way that warrants it. I like games where decisions hold a lot of weight. In ST, even a 3-hit combo can take half your life and potentially dizzy you and I’m sure most people in the forum understand the depth that goes into mastering such a game.

tl;dr
it’s quick and “cheap”


#6

It’s up on PSN already just search Virtua Fighter


#7

I consider VF5 a seven button game, as each button combination is its own “button”. There’s P, K, G, P+K, P+G, K+G, and P+K+G. I actually map my buttons so that I have all of them as a button except for K+G. So for me it’s a six button game :slight_smile:

Agree with the rest of your post.


#8

Is there any reason why P+K is listed twice?


#9

Maybe there are a lot of shitty games lately so when you see a rare good game without scrub mechanics it reminds you of another good game?
There are a lot of new good fighting games out there but you need to venture outside of your familiar comfort zone for them.


#10

That was a typo, thanks for pointing it out. Should have been K+G


#11

I feel this too. Its hard to really explain it.

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#12

Hahaha aw man I used to be really zealous and almost refused to play someone in a tournament because he mapped just one of those to a button.

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#13

Reminds me of this other game that was released in 2008 that was a lot like ST, too.

It got mixed reviews.


#14

I used to love VF but everyone I know was like, “Nah I don’t like that, let’s play Tekken.”

So I sort of never grew in the 3D world.


#15

VF (and the old Tobal series) feel similar to ST and HF to me, but I can’t explain why. Immense depth from a very simple premise? It is probably hard to explain why it feels similar.