What DPI for Custom Stick Art?


#1

Hi!

I’m working on a custom currently. I was wondering what DPI most use to print their images for custom sticks. I’ve found a few good images, but most are fairly low dpi (~72) which I assume won’t reproduce well. Is there a good minimum I should look for? I tried to do a search but “DPI” didn’t get me any hits.

Thank you in advance for any advice you may offer.


#2

#3

I was afraid of that. Most of the art I’ve found so far is pretty low DPI. I guess I’ll have to try to dust off my photoshop skills.

Thank you for the advice.


#4

72 looked absolutely great when I printed it out on my home printer (which is real cheap) using thick photo paper,

but since the printer sucks, it printed the image all slanty and it didnt fit on the page >_<

so I PSD->JPG’ed it and took it to staples to print it,

it came out looking like CRAP~!!!

but yeay, anyway, 300 sounds like a good idea for the next one


#5

jpg images don’t have a such thing as “DPI”. Technically any image you download can have any DPI you want (besides a PDF or PSD or something that has its own internal formatting). It’s just a matter of how big an image is going to be at each DPI. A 800x600 image is only going to be a few inches big at 300 DPI, but at 72 DPI it’s the size of a sheet of paper. When you’re putting together a document at 200-300 DPI (considered quality print DPI), you just need extreme resolution of your images. Things you find on the web usually aren’t going to be good enough.


#6

Well you can resize 72 dpi image up to twice the original resolution and it will still look good on 300 dpi print.


#7

you shouldn’t be able to to enlarge a 72-dpi image but 300 can be enlarged to about 4 times its size before you can see the pixels.
So any dpi is fine so long as the image is the right dimensions for your stick.


#8

This is completely incorrect. No offense meant, but it’s basically the cardinal rule of rastor imaging.

It all just depends on what your tolerance for looking good enough is. Anything under about 250 DPI looks like trash printed to me. Also, ANY time you scale up rastor imaging, it will always look scaled. It’s just a matter of whether or not you care. I spend all day working with digital imagery, so my ability to tolerate imperfections and artifacting is pretty minimal.


#9

i have some experience in printing 300 dpi artworks, and i can tell you 1000x1000 px 72 dpi image can be stretched to 2000x2000 and printed in 300 dpi and look good, for usual people, not professionals with sharp and trained eye. If that image wasn’t overcompressed from the start, of course.

i mean, yes i know stretching hurts pictures, but it’s not like you can find some place to get, say, fighting art in resolution high enough for a4 300 dpi.


#10

man this is um great information, thanks~!!!

I do not have any time to stick build, but I already made the PSD templates for when the time comes.

I’ll probably redo/fix them up a bit to be ready when the time is right!

^_^b


#11

I don’t suppose your templates are for American style parts? I’m having a rough time finding US style templates with proper button spacing.


#12

I am a graphic designer and know what I am saying. If you print a 72-dpi image at say 800 x 1000 and a 300-dpi image at 800 x 1000 they should look the same.


#13

I like your custom work a lot. Very clean and classy looking.


#14

they will look the same, but one will be bigger than the other, correct??

but if u stretched the 300dpi image to be the same size on paper as the 72dpi one, which one would look better?? would they really look the same??


#15

If you’re a graphic designer, I sure hope you’re you’re still in school or something. Say that around my office and you’ll get fired faster than lightning.

800x1000@300 DPI = 2.67x3.3 inches
800x1000@72 DPI ~ 11.1x13.9 inches

DPI only dictates how big an image is when printed. DPI = “Dots Per Inch”. If you have a 3000 pixels wide image, and a 300 DPI print setting, it will span 10 inches, because every inch will take 300 dots (pixels) to fill.

Most people aren’t going to be able to tell the difference between 150-200 or 300 DPI printed on good paper with a crappy printer (like a home printer, or a cheap kinkos print) because the ink will “bleed” and you won’t get a super-accurate print to begin with. However, you can most definitely tell the difference between 72 dpi and 300 DPI. It’s not even a question. It’s like setting a 400x300 image as your desktop wallpaper in stretch mode.

If you really can’t get ahold of adequate imagery to pull off 300 DPI (and you most likely can’t, because 300+ DPI is what we push off of our industrial printers at work and a simple 8.5x11 print requires a resolution of 2550x3300 pixels minimum…I say just do your stick art at about 150’ish DPI. It’s usually a pretty good middle ground. 150 DPI means that anything you find that’s high quality desktop wallpaper size will be big enough to print on a standard-sized stick.

Happy hunting. =)


#16

bollocks you’re right aren’t you. Sigh…
the 72 dpi image needs to be larger for it to look the same as the 300 dpi one.


#17

Minimum 250, 300 preferable.


#18

Yeps, you are correct.
And I’m only temporarily right. I’m sure I’ll be wrong about something in the very near future. Of course, I won’t admit it.


#19

It hurts doesnt it :sad:


#20

:rofl: :rofl: :rofl: