What is the purpose of a shaft cover?


#1

I’ve noticed that some JLF’s come with shaft covers and some do not. Does the shaft cover serve a purpose other than decoration?


#2

The shaft cover actually does serve a purpose. If you were an arcade manager, and have hundreds of customers coming in to play on your machines, you’d want to maintain the life of your equipment and arcade parts for as long as you possibly can. Whether it’s from oils from their fingers and/or food or they have sweaty hands when they play, customers coming into an arcade can cause the shaft of joysticks to rust far earlier than the microswitches die. So, shaft covers are a nice way to prolong the life of a joystick of any kind. My only sadness comes from the fact that the Seimitsu LS-32 models don’t have access to Seimitsu’s shaft covers, but that can be solved by swapping in an LS-40 shaft.


#3

Wow, I thought the shafts were stainless steel and rust-proof.


#4

As great as that would be, it’s unfortunately not the case. That’d cause joystick prices to rise by a few dollars and why bother with that when you can circumvent the problem by having a shaft-cover which serves a similar purpose and will protect your joystick at least until the microswitches die? Business my friend is a terrifying thing.

Though somehow, I’m under the suspicion that the LS-32s have shafts that are coated with some sort of protective layer to at least protect them for a little while. Must be my imagination though.


#5

Also (somewhat obviously) the cover makes a fairly large difference on the “feel” of the stick. Personally I can’t stand a JLF with a shaft cover on it, but others like it on a lot more. It doesn’t affect movement, only how the stick feels in your hand (though I suppose this doesn’t apply if you use an American grip on it, but for those of us who use a wineglass or pinky-under grip it can be quite a change).


#6

Is there any truth to the notion that the shaft cover prevents static electricity from the player’s hands from traveling down the shaft and into the electronics?


#7

It can sorta prevent the balltop from being stolen since you can’t get a grip with a shaft cover


#8

I’ve noticed my shaft cover is starting to grind down on the pivot

is this known to cause any permanent damage?


#9

When you say grind down, do you mean the shaft cover is flaking little pieces off against the pivot? If that’s what is happening, those pieces could make their way into the pivot and ruin the socket.


#10

if i take the shaft cover off there is white powder on the inside of it, the powder is plastic from the pivot


#11

It’s still generally easier to acquire a spare JLF-CD set and thin the interior of that to fit the LS-32 shaft.

It’s a 45 minute procedure to modify a JLF-CD to fit the LS-32 shaft. The JLF-CD still costs quite a bit less than buying a replacement shaft. You don’t need power tools to mod the JLF-CD… Precision files are enough unless you have ahold of a Dremel with a round cutter. You can use the cutter to shorten the height of the JLF cover to the height of the LS-32 shaft. That can also be done with a big file which will take a bit more time…

I generally don’t like “Frankensteining.” As much as possible, I like to keep the equipment close to OEM!

It’s still a puzzle as to why Seimitsu doesn’t make an LS-32 shaft cover other than maybe they want the stick shafts to rust and force arcades to order replacement sticks???


#12

LS-32 shaft is pretty fat. Any more diameter and it could be unwieldy.


#13

Unlikely to make a difference. If your personal static electricity is causing problems with the stick, you may have a defective stick, or other, more serious, problems.


#14

Not with the JLF-CD. Handles pretty well. I still feel a difference between that the JLF… pretty much in the LS-32’s favor. It’s just a tiny bit more responsive than the JLF.

The shaft cover doesn’t add much to the LS-32 thickness at all. A covered LS-32 shaft and JLF shaft with unmodded JLF-CD set are about the same thickness. They’d have to be or the cover mod wouldn’t work! :lol:

The main reason to get the shaft cover is to keep the LS-32 shaft from rusting/corroding. Sweat will just eat away at it.

Ask anybody who has an uncovered joystick shaft about how good they look after a few years of taking abuse from sweat and oil.

It’s not pretty!


#15

My Hori EX2 has a rusted shaft. Even after cleaning with steel wool, the rusted part just won’t come off. It’s smooth to the touch but still all rusted up.

Get a shaft cover if possible. Saves you a lot of time.