What kind of Stick is in the MLG Arcade Stick?


#1

Hello Everyone,

A friend of mine recently purchased a couple of the MLG arcade sticks for his arcade and he told me that everyone who tried them out was not happy with the feel of the stick itself. People complained that it just felt off to them. I tried it out and I did notice there was a difference. It seemed to require more of a throw to reach the corners of the gate. Considering I have a fairly large hand, I actually found this to be quite refreshing. Hitting diagonal inputs seemed much easier with this stick than on the normal gate. There were even some moves I normally struggle with on my hitbox that were easy to do with the MLG arcade stick.

Though, I’m still not exactly sure what is so different about this stick compared to the normal sticks out there. Does anyone know what kind of stick is in the MLG’s and where I can find one? I would prefer to put it in a dual modded arcade stick like a Qanba. If anyone can shed light on this please feel free.

Thanks,


#2

Should be a stock Sanwa JLF although some have noticed problems where what were supposed to be stock Sanwa buttons in the MLG stick turned out to be the MadCatz clones. That being said, different JLFs may or may not have different “feels” to them even with both being brand new.


#3

I think there’s a notable difference but you easily solved it! Since I got my MLG TE it just felt off. The extra throw to hit corners was killing my game compared to the JLF in my modded SE. It wasn’t the worst by any means but the execution errors are racking up subsequently.

Hopefully its easy enough to switch sticks. I’m really not sure of the harness’ and whatnot whether it’d be simple or not.


#4

Its why I am making the swap from Sanwa JLFs to Seimitsu joysticks.

The Seimitsu joysticks require little to no modding unlike the JLF which there thousands of mods for, and their feel is more consistent to me for each instance of a particular model of joystick.


#5

Here, here!

I agree with you on that one…

At what point do you decide it’s less expensive to trade in models than to keep buying replacement parts, wrapping insulation around the actuator to make it bigger, adding extra springs, and so on…???

The mod tutorials for the JLF got ridiculous!
And yet most people here will never try another joystick brand/model and see that, “Gee, the JLF really isn’t all it’s cracked up to be!”

On the other hand, if some people can hack the JLF, more power to them! I sure didn’t like it after a while… Could never get some of the SF super moves to come out consistently in SF IV and the JLF was absolutely horrible on retro-fighters.


#6

Thank you both Darksakul and GeorgeC for the input. The debates I’ve seen between Sanwa/Seimitsu always ended up as “choose what’s right for you” but no real difference between the two. I’ve only tried JLF so far but it’s really not 100% for me. VSav is a chore with JLF and makes me second guess my execution somewhat.

For the time being I’ll have to settle with it and there are worse so no complaining here haha.

Would either of you gentlemen know resources to removing my JLF from SE to MLG TE? I’ve been searching page after page here in TT and not finding too much.

I may be able to wing it on my own but it’s a great peace of mind to know what I’m getting into before somehow managing two crippled sticks haha.


#7

I think this video might help you.


#8

Personally, I’d just learn to get used to different feeling stock JLFs, if just for the fact that you never know when you’ll need to use someone else’s stick at a tournament.


#9

Thank you Genericaster! I actually just finished it before seeing this! There’s great information in the video, especially for Seimitsu so I’ll be needing that sooner or later.

I decided to take the plunge considering I couldn’t stand playing the TE the way it was. R1/2, TE-S, etc. all sort of confuse me in terms of what the differences may entail but the process of swapping everything over was pretty simple. Hardest part was getting through the seal of glue connecting the harness to the JLF.


#10

Or even better yet do not get used to the feeling of any one joystick, but get used to different joysticks of various makes, models and even mods.
There no guarantee you are going to get a a JLF or a LS-32 if you get a loaner stick. You could be stick with a Crown, Happ or some rare or obscure joystick.

There are people out there with a Suzo inductive, a Leaf Switched Joystick from GroovyGameGear, Ultimarc’s Mag-Stik Plus, Old-New Stock Wico sticks, heavily modded Qanba Sticks and so on.


#11

Wow, the wisdom! I thought it was just Sanwa, Seimitsu, Crown and Happ.


#12

There is alot of arcade part manufacturers, some authentic, some replica, some dubbed New-Old stock (unsold old parts from companies out of business but the parts are still in new condition) and the infamous knock offs.

This is not a definitive list

Korean parts include Crown and Myoungshin Fanta
American/European style parts include Happ, Suzo (which got folded into Happ later on) IL, Wico (out of business) and a few others.
Everyone Knows of Japanese having Sanwa and Seimitsu parts
There are the Jyueeang parts also known as Rollies (from Rollie Electronics) and the Quartz (Focus Attack)
Zippy who made some clones of the Sanwa JLF and Seimitsu LS-32
Ultimarc with some replicas of older American parts, The J-stick which is an alternative to the Sanwa JLW and some of their own stuff.
Hori (Fighting Edge) and Qanba (PDP’s Injustice stick and Qanba’s New Q 1 Cut) make their own parts
Namco and Konami made some parts that were custom made for some of their cabs that are unique to their machines such as their light guns.
Mad Catz has their own clones of Sanwa parts.
Groovy Game Gear makes Replicas of older now discontinued parts including leaf switch joysticks and buttons and the Authentic Tron and Satan’s Hollow flight sticks.
Sega and Nintendo made many of their own parts before (some outsourced to other companies)
Ascii made alot of there own parts with the only option for Japanese style sticks having optical PCBs for a while until Toodles came up with the Spark and Rollie (and Happ) reissuing the Sanwa Flash 1.