What would be a real good metric of progress?


#1

I would look at win loss ratio but mine is so low even if I were improving on the front that would not really show me progress.


#2

The most satisfying thing for me has been becoming able to beat people who used to perfect me when i first started playing.

I don’t think it’s that important that you win, what’s important is that your opponent has to work hard for the win.


#3

Hmm. I just recently found out that one of the top Ryu spars with me on psn for some reason…
Sometimes I just randomly get perfected by people… :frowning:
That said I guess I can take your metric and apply it. Problem is sometimes i don’t get the same people who perfected me.


#4

Focus on learning small fundamental aspects and wheter you can apply them consistently as your metric until you can start counting in wins.

Ex: Did you anti air their jump-in when you could, Did you hit your bnb like you should have.

Once all those are second nature to you, then you can start careing about win/loss ratio.


#5

there is no useful metric. closest thing would be setting benchmarks for yourself (Beat player X in tournament). but I’ll repeat, there is no useful metric.

caring about your win/loss ratio is just going to make you spend too much time playing against easy opponents to maintain it.


#6

I stopped giving a damn about the w/l thing and am more focused on looking for a suite of metrics so I can compare my progress. A few things said has helped me some what.


#7

Are you good at interpreting trends in pie charts or graphs? I have some sweet data analysis tools that you can use to help track and review your stats and best manage your training regimen.

Here’s a quick visual I made that I think nicely demonstrates my progress.


#8

In a few months I started fighting games after a long year hiatus I saw some improvement. Most notably that even if I lose I make the opponents lose their life bar a lot. that did not occur previously. also as another example I became much better at controlling the keyboard. though laptop keyboard I currently use is much worse than the desktop keyboard in response time and button presses.

Of course if there is a very good player he’ll beat me easily. Particularly in KOF2002 and 3S some opponents are so fast in using combos, frame traps and specials that even if I wanted to I could not do a thing and lose immediately. they are beyond my league. I win only if they let me but I do not like that
it is like comparing an elementary school degree to a PHD.
I found my limits and I try to keep that level. most important thing is not to get better but not to get worse.


#9

Yeah but geeez you’re doing it the hard way on a laptop keyboard. That’s a big disadvantage right there.


#10

beating who you didn’t beat, seeing what you didn’t see, fighting what you didn’t know was there.


#11

Making and achieving goals for yourself based on where you need to improve as a player.


#12

christ, I’m no higher than 3,12 yet! I can see youve been in da lab


#13

Enough for you to notice that you have improved or something dry and cut is memorizing a long combo.


#14

memorizing is the easy part. applying it is the hard part. even if I do 1/4th of the combo it suffices.


#15

I always have some small thing Im working on.
Frame traps, options selects, set ups, combos. I start with them in training room.
I then go into real matches and try to apply them. When I am able to apply them in the appropriate situation and start being successful with them, I consider myself improved.
The more I know/can do, the more I know I have improved.

Its a nice little way to feeling improvement and it’s a lot nicer not worrying about win/loss or pp/bp