Why do converters cause input lag?


#1

Sorry if this is a bad, thread, I tried searching for input lag stuff and found info about which converters lag, but no reason why.

I have a couple of main questions -
Why do some converters create input lag and other don’t? (I.E., varying lags between different ps2->ps3 converters, varying lags from DC -> PS2 converters, etc).
Why are X-Arcades so laggy?

I’m throwing around the idea of building a custom stick monstrosity that can connect to a crapload of consoles, like the one built here - J and D’s stick.

They use a strip set-up to connect all the buttons like so -

http://home.comcast.net/~jdpyle1/images/Arcade_Controller/Construction/Controls_Arcade_07.jpg

These go to DB25 connectors which can then be connected to the appropriate project box depending on what system they want to play.

http://home.comcast.net/~jdpyle1/images/Arcade_Controller/Construction/Controls_DC_07.jpg

Does their method of using the actual controllers as “converters” eliminate the input lags? Having a super stick like theirs would be nice, but I don’t want to spend so much time effort and money to build it if it won’t operate like a real arcade machine.


#2

Poor coding more than anything else. Most controller have to have a particular set of commands sent to them serially to get the status of the stick, only to respond the status serially again. That takes time. If the converter reads the controller once per frame, like a console would, and the console reads the converter once per frame like normal, there’s a one frame delay right there. But, anyone who thinks they can tell the difference between one frame of lag is full of shit.
Its just a coding and engineering problem. The more fine tuned they make the converter, the more controllers it wont work with. So they have to balance between interoperability and speed.
As for X-arcade, well, their way of doing things was to focus on cheap. Most people are playing Pac-Man on those sticks and couldn’t tell the difference because they haven’t seen a real arcade machine since second grade.

Those kind of setups are usually refered to as ‘project box’ setups, because the actual PCB for the system in outside of the stick, usually in a small plastic box called project boxes by electronics hobbiests; that’s how they’re labelled at Radio Shack.

A project box setup like the one described absolutely will not cause lab. Ironically, the Dreamcast one pictured WILL have lag from the triggers; it’s an officiel first party pad using HAL effect sensors for the triggers. Those have been tested and shown to lag without question. Press strong and fierce at the exact same time, the strong will register before the fierce something like 90% of the time.

Take a lot of time, and read a crap ton of stuff from here in Tech Talk. You’ll learn a bunch and get some feedback on the pro’s and con’s of just about everything dealing with sticks.


#3

sorry for lacking info but apparently there’s a program here that will help you determine lag for convertors, it’s on this forums so looking around will do you good