Wikileaks is now 3-0


#1

[Quote]
Secret US embassy cables revealed
Documents detail calls for an attack on Iran, claims of US spying at the UN and widespread criticisms of world leaders.
Last Modified: 29 Nov 2010 04:54 GMT

The US state department has worked to contain the potential fallout from the secret diplomatic cables [Reuters]

The whistleblowing website WikiLeaks has released a massive trove of leaked US diplomatic cables detailing candid opinions of various world leaders, repeated calls for a US attack on Iran, and requests for US diplomats to spy on officials of other countries.

WikiLeaks started publishing the 251,287 cables - 15,652 of which are classified “secret” - from 274 US missions around the world on Sunday, even after its website apparently came under a denial of service attack before the release.

The cables, communications between diplomatic missions abroad and the US state department in Washington, were mostly sent between 2007 and last February and could embarrass both the US administration and foreign governments.

Some of the diplomatic notes detailed how Arab leaders in the Gulf have been urging an attack on “evil” Iran, while others reveal serious fears in Washington over the security of Pakistan’s nuclear weapons programme.

They also detail advice given to US diplomats on how to gather intelligence and pass information of interest over to the country’s spy agencies. According to documents, senior UN figures were the target of intelligence gathering by US diplomats.

‘US contradictions’

In an introduction to the documents on its website, WikiLeaks attacked “the contradictions between the US’ public persona and what it says behind closed doors”.

"The cables show the extent of US spying on its allies and the UN; turning a blind eye to corruption and human rights abuse in ‘client states’; backroom deals with supposedly neutral countries; lobbying for US corporations; and the measures US diplomats take to advance those who have access to them."
Live updates

The White House has described the leaks as “reckless and dangerous”.

“To be clear - such disclosures put at risk our diplomats, intelligence professionals, and people around the world who come to the United States for assistance in promoting democracy and open government,” Robert Gibbs, the White House press secretary, said in a statement.

But Julian Assange, the founder of WikiLeaks, denied that any of the documents placed individuals at risk.

“As far as we are aware, and as far as anyone has ever alleged in any credible manner whatsoever, no single individual has ever come to harm as a result of anything that we have ever published,” he said on Sunday.

The New York Times newspaper, which received the documents before their release, explained its decision to publish the cables by saying they “serve an important public interest”.

The newspaper said it had “taken care to exclude… information that would endanger confidential informants or compromise national security.”

It said it had notified White House officials of the cables and asked if other information should be redacted, adding that it “agreed to some, but not all” of their suggestions.

The UK’s Guardian newspaper said all five papers had decided “neither to ‘dump’ the entire dataset into the public domain, nor to publish names that would endanger innocent individuals”.

US officials took the unusual step on Saturday of sending a letter to WikiLeaks to warn against the release of the secret government documents, which it says will put “countless” lives at risk.

The letter, from Harold Hongju Koh, the US state department’s most-senior lawyer, argued that publishing the classified files would threaten counterterrorism operations and jeopardise US relations with its allies.

Leaders criticised

The cache of documents contains allegations of corruption against foreign leaders, who are subjected to stinging criticism in the cables, with Vladimir Putin, the Russian prime minister, referred to as an “alpha-dog.”

Angela Merkel, the German Chancellor, “avoids risk and is rarely creative”, and Hamid Karzai, the Afghan president, is described as being “driven by paranoia”, in comments contained within diplomatic dispatches.

Advisers to Recep Tayyip Erdogan, the Turkish premier, also come in for criticism for having “little understanding of politics beyond Ankara”.

US diplomats visited foreign ministries in the days before the release hoping to stave off anger over the cables, which are internal messages that often lack the niceties diplomats voice in public.

Steve Clemons, a political strategist and director of the American Strategy Programme at New America Foundation, told Al Jazeera that the US reaction to this latest round of leaks has been stronger than in the past because of mainly diplomatic concerns.

“Certainly I wouldn’t take it to the level of lives lost on the battlefield. This is essentially diplomatic brouhaha,” he said.

"I think also that the content of these documents is a lot about the gossip and innuendo and the nuance … and there are going to be a lot of embarrassing things that come out of these documents.

“There are be political repercussions of the way foreign leaders are going to read these documents. And in that sense, you’re going to see people, ranging from [Asif Ali] Zardari in Pakistan, to, I understand, Nelson Mandela of South Africa has had some bad swipes taken at him in these cables.”

WikiLeaks previously published 400,000 Iraq war documentsin October, the biggest leak to date in US intelligence history, and 77,000 classified US files on the Afghan conflict in July.

[/Quote]

Source: Secret US embassy cables revealed - Americas - Al Jazeera English

Once again with yet another major leak, and I didn’t think they’d be able to top the iraq war docs as far as causign a ruckus but color me surprised


#2

So they pretty much leaked what was already implied before it was leaked. The QQing is just a formality.


#3

Wikileaks = gossipy bitch?


#4

I don’t have much of a contribution, but up until just now I always misheard this sites name as wikilinks, and assumed it actually followed a wiki format.


#5

Some things are just better left untold.


#6

What gossip…


#7

how is this leak bigger than all the iraq documents? all this leak does is confirm that politicians are thinking what you think they’re thinking. nobody should be surprised by this.


#8

OOOOOOH, I HEARD THAT GUY SAY DOESN’T THE GERMAN CHANCELLOR!!

OMG, OMG YOU GUYS, SOMEONE SAID THE TURKISH PREMIER ONLY UNDERSTANDS THE POLITICS OF TURKEY!!

FIGHT YOU GUYS, YOU GUYS SHOULD FIGHT!!!

How about you eat a dick. Ignoring for a moment the fact that this whole thing seems to be some sort of crusade to speak out against “the contradictions between the US’ public persona and what it says behind closed doors”, which shows a rather blatant bias: there is so much petty bullshit here that it shrouds any actual important information rather well.

Also, diplomacy has a lot to do with perception- as America we don’t give a shit what other countries think about us because we assume everyone hates us anyway. If we’re viewed as being antagonistic or otherwise undiplomatic, it will force other countries to try to save face, even if they don’t genuinely care what some people in the U.S. government think of them. This is compounded by the fact that most people will hear about this the way it was represented in the OP- that is, without any real context or details whatsoever (I’m not faulting the OP for it, just saying).

The wikileaks dump is going to make things harder for a hell of a lot of people out of vanity, and that should be fucking embarrassing for them. But because of their agenda and because they view themselves as standing up to someone, or something, somehow, I’m sure they feel great about it.

I’m not a fan, in other words.


#9

Where do they keep getting this stuff?


#10

“As far as causing a ruckus”, simply that you have politicians all up in arms about this like WWIII was about to start, while there wasn’t near as much scrambling to safeguard with the Iraq War documents, but obviously this is a tad bit different

@Roninchaos: that’s what I want to know, I was reading stuff about the iraq war leaks that it was possibly someone in the military who downloaded the files and gave them to wikileaks, but no idea on this one. But if they have all of this, what else could they possibly have >_>


#11

somebody should be sent to hit this guy in the mouth.


#12

most of the original shit was leaked by a guy in the US army, too lazy to google who though. Tons of other shit have come from other countries and hackers (ie- Anonymous).

China directly responsible for google hacking

They’ve basically been proving a lot of shit people generally already knew about (toxic dumping in third world countries, the US hates the middle east, asia is secretly evil, guantanamo bay was pure hell, various world governments have tried to blacklist parts of the internet, church of scientology is evil, etc etc).

It’s a slap in the face to some big countries, but this shit needed to be done.

What I find funniest, is how every time the governments or church of scientology try to use their methods to stop wikileaks (ie-freezing their accounts, DoS attacks on their site/servers, court orders, etc), the info gets out anyways.

This is retribution, plain and simple. If you do bad things, you do NOT get to fucking whine about it when people find out.

edit: i lol’d:

DUH!!! The guy installed a puppet government (his own version of Ronald Reagan?), is STILL in charge, was in the KGB, and during the fall of the USSR, his badass stayed in Germany to shred documents


#13

Whatever. We are all fools to believe that countries are pristine and morally upright, but if I had to choose a country that gives its people a fair chance, I would always choose the USofA. Wikileaks is nothing more than an attention monger and constitutes pure hate directed towards the US. All of their major “findings” are based on our country.

Can’t they find secret documents from OTHER countries???

I am sure England, Canada, Iraq, etc. all have shit in the dark that should also be brought to light. If they are not going to provide material that isn’t revealing of other countries, companies, etc, then they should rename their website to USAGovLeaks.com


#14

^ Got some links for all the stuff you just mentioned?

I’m really not surprised by anything that was discovered. At first I was all like “Damn it US government” then I kept reading and I was all like “Oh nm :coffee:


#15

you’re an idiot. They HAVE leaked info on other countries. MANY OTHER COUNTRIES. Australia, parts of Asia, parts of Europe, America, etc.

Sorry to say that Canada really isn’t doing anything evil behind the scenes. We’re not exactly the type that has power to completely fuck with other countries and their people.

And maybe this should tell the US to either fucking start doing business a LITTLE more ethically, or learn to shut the fuck up when they’re supposed to

of course countries, like people, aren’t pristine and perfect. However, as people, we would hope that when you GET FUCKING CAUGHT DOING BAD SHIT, repercussions come and bite you in the ass, as opposed to “oh yeah, we been spying on the UN and the entire middle east wants Iran gone, and Pakistan is probably about to lose/sell a Nuke, but whatever…how bout dem Cowboys?”


#16

Keep on wishing for the demise of the US… As Canada’s greatest ally due to proximity, the situation up there can get really dire if the US becomes an unstable country. Wikileaks reveals documents of a sensitive nature that would cause such an outcome.


#17

I never wish for the demise of the US. Our two countries depend on each other. We supply you with hydro (the electric kind, and the weed kind), resources, and comedy. You’re our army.

And yet again, I’d rather this shit come into public knowledge, then allow the country right next door to keep doing sinister shit and fucking over the rest of the world.

It’s like getting caught cheating on ur wife, then blaming the shit you get into on the person who told her.

If you look at the history of US info leaks, it’s usually coming from high up sources (Deep Throat was 2nd in command at the FBI) who realize there is AN ABUSE OF POWER.

Fuck off and keep your idiotic right wing idealogy to yourself. The REST OF THE WORLD deserves to know what the big dogs are doing to keep them down.


#18

I like that a vendetta against the Church of Scientology is mixed in with these things. Does it even represent 1% of the impending threat or far reaching effects of any of those other issues?


#19

Yeah, because everything is black and white. This good this bad. And with all its faults, America is THE only country I’d want to live in. What has the REST OF THE WORLD done for ME lately?


#20

It’s been blatantly obvious that wikileaks views making the US look bad at every possible chance as it’s sole reason for existence, nobody is shocked by them. In fact, it’s counter productive. If Assange was not a full of shit ego maniac hell bent on his own private vendetta against the US (and he can take a number and get in line) he’d realize that his stupidity will only make information harder to get. More information will be classified, destroyed, and less put in writing. Nobody is going to talk opening on cables they know may get leaked. Just as no general is going to talk to the press after the McChrystal mess.

So congrats, he got out a bunch of leaks that simply confirm what everybody knew, and he gets to gloat about making the US look “bad” (in quotes because we don’t, everybody already knew all of the stuff that came out) with the side shot of making information even harder to come by and giving the US good reason to lock down information even further.