Z-Motion Sickness


#1

Well this is ironic to post on the Shoryuken Forums.

I will admit this right out the gate, I am not a very good player. I love fighting games but I’ve never been actually good with them. Although I owned the original on Dreamcast, it wasn’t until the XBL/PSN port of MvC2 and the release of BlazBlue that I started to actually become curious as to HOW moves were performed in fighting games besides merely mashing buttons and see what happens.

One thing that has bewildered me ever since I started learning fighting game mechanics is the Shoryuken Z-Motion. For years, even before I paid attention, I found myself doing it by pure accident and still do. I still don’t really understand how to do it consciously. I’m beginning to get better at it but only barely. I still do it by accident and most times I try to do it intentionally end up registering as a Hadoken motion or just don’t work at all. This especially screws me up in fighting games since essential moves are often mapped to a Shoryuken or Reverse Shoryruken motion (Motions which took me ages to make sense of as being Forward+Down+DiagonalForwardDown and I still kind of don’t get it).

I know this sounds like I’m complaining about my own lack of skill, but I have to ask how is everyone able to pull this off so easily? It makes no sense to me.


#2

lots of practice. no secret


#3

Forward, then Hadouken. Quickly. You don’t have to end specifically on the diagonal down-forward, you can keep going to full forward and it won’t matter.

Are you using a stick? Are you perhaps “riding” the edges too much making you slow?

Just keep at it and it’ll be second nature soon enough. It does seem to be the hardest move to teach new people though, hard to explain too.


#4

I’m using a controller. I can’t bring myself to use a stick. I tried and I just couldn’t do it. I’m too used to my Xbox controller and I don’t have the money to get a stick to bother getting used to it.


#5

Well, it may help to think of it as forward, down, forward (keyboard style)


#6

I think Rachel said it best in BlazBlue. Start by walking forward, then input down, then down-forward.


#7

this is the specific motion. things like Z or forward+qcf are just ways to make it seem more fluid and natural


#8

If you ask me, making the motion look like a Z is ANYTHING except natural. It seems almost inhuman…


#9

Even I had trouble with DP motion at the beginning,
Do what everyone else above me have advised you: fwd, qcf(Hadoken motion) on the analog or fwd,down,fwd on the dpad, just keep practicing


#10

its natural with a stick, and the x-box controller is horrible for fighting games


#11

IIRC in the latest Guilty Gears you must end the motion at d/f and not get to f. So why learn to rely on a non-accurate motion that won’t work for every game?


#12

ha well maybe its a stick thing. It certainly seemed more natural than f, d, df. Altho you def don’t need a stick for this motion.


#13

That’s because-

The Z is a stick motion, not a pad motion.
And drop the 360 pad.


#14

I first learned dragon punch motions on a pad (ps1) and going over to stick dp motions were the hardest for me to relearn.

For me, if you place the tip of your thumb on forward and the 2nd joint of your thumb on down, you can kinda tilt your thumb from forward to down and then slide the tip of your thumb to down/forward. I hope that makes sense.

The basic x360 pad sucks but the deluxe edition with the rotating pad is quite nice and I can get dragon punch motions just fine along with the holy grail on x360 pads: tapping forward, forward without jumping X_X

But yeah, the true answer is practice:
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#15

I don’t have it around to test, but that sounds really stupid. What kind of input parser would force that. Wouldn’t that mean you can’t do things like TK:ing etc?
And I think I recall playing GGXX#R PC on keyboard and it accepting f,d,f…?

Anyway, yeah, 360 pad might be the problem. The 360 pad in particular is like the worst pad imo. Might be that the ones I’ve tried has been worn out, but that d-pad is so inaccurate.


#16

These kinds of threads belong in the Newbie Saikyo Dojo only.


#17

Out of curiosity, why do people use the d-pad on controllers? I’ve not had too much issue with the analog stick :confused: It may not be completely accurate, but it’s usable.

In the Capcom games, you can pretty much just wiggle the analog stick and it’ll read the motion, but that is a really bad habit that sucks to break. Practicing it accurately will help you in the longrun.

EDIT:

To be fair, the SRK forum isn’t the easiest to navigate when you are just getting used to it :confused:


#18

I dunno I hate dpad but I definitely like it better than the analog stick. Analog stick is almost ddr pad level to me.


#19

practicing and doing the motion precisely is far better than scrubbing the d-pad in the hopes of the move coming out. seriously, i have seen kids before furiously scrubbing the forward, down, down-forward motion on the d-pad and hitting any punch button repeatedly, trying to pull off a shoryuken. it was really weird and i feel sorry for the controller being mutilated like that. muscle memory will not develop that way so it’s better to hit practice mode and turn on the command display to make sure you are doing it correctly. i have been playing on stick since SF2 though but i’m able to adjust to pad well enough. just don’t use controllers with worn out rubber contacts. and the PS controller is one of the best controller designs ever. good luck!

8P


#20

Guess it’s just that it feels weird. Just a matter of preference. But dashing (or any double tap move) with analog stick is terrible.